Intrusion detection and alarm management takes an enterprise approach

Published: Friday, October 06, 2017 @ 10:50 AM


            Staff Sgt. Joshua Modlin, assistant noncommissioned officer in charge of the 88th Security Forces Squadron’s Electronic Security Systems, works with Joe Andrews of M.C. Dean Inc. to establish a configuration baseline by ensuring the more than 16,000 ESS assets throughout Wright-Patterson Air Force Base are accurately identified Sept. 20. Andrews helped develop the Infrastructure Maintenance Management System being implemented throughout the Air Force to not only track maintenance of critical ESS infrastructure, but also help to identify trending problems and develop improvements that can be implemented enterprise wide. (U.S. Air Force photo/Jim Varhegyi)
Staff Sgt. Joshua Modlin, assistant noncommissioned officer in charge of the 88th Security Forces Squadron’s Electronic Security Systems, works with Joe Andrews of M.C. Dean Inc. to establish a configuration baseline by ensuring the more than 16,000 ESS assets throughout Wright-Patterson Air Force Base are accurately identified Sept. 20. Andrews helped develop the Infrastructure Maintenance Management System being implemented throughout the Air Force to not only track maintenance of critical ESS infrastructure, but also help to identify trending problems and develop improvements that can be implemented enterprise wide. (U.S. Air Force photo/Jim Varhegyi)

The Air Force’s Installation Management and Mission Support Center developed a solution for not only managing the day-to-day maintenance of intrusion detection and alarm systems, but also for developing and implementing a continuous improvement process.

The Air Force Security Forces Center, which falls under the AFIMSC umbrella, began implementing the management change last year, and Wright-Patterson Air Force Base is the most current installation to come into the enterprise-wide program.

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“This is a big win for the Security Forces career field,” said Maj. Aaron Rittgers, 88th Security Forces Squadron commander.

He explained that normally at each location throughout the Air Force, intrusion detection and alarm systems are designed and maintained locally. Electronic Security Systems is a Security Forces mission area. Under the current management model, ESS defenders have to learn the unique attributes of a location and how the various alarms and detection systems of that location are operated and managed.

“Under the new model being implemented across the Air Force, our ESS defenders can hit the ground running when they change locations because the systems are being managed the same way across the Air Force,” Rittgers said. “The enterprise solution being implemented is truly a force multiplier in how we protect the vital assets under our care.”

When asked about the challenges unique to Wright-Patterson AFB, Rittgers explained because of the nature of the work being done, the base has the largest volume of alarm and intrusion detection systems in the Air Force.

“As with any change, we are anticipating some hiccups along the way, but our ESS defenders have been working diligently with the incoming BCF Solutions contractors to ensure that the changeover goes smoothly, and the process remains seamless to our customers,” he said.

Rittgers also praised civil engineer and communication professionals, whom he described as diligent partners in managing the ESS systems to date. He explained they did a phenomenal job supporting the mission and responding to any problems that cropped up in the systems, day or night.

Instrumental in ensuring the success of the management changeover has been Tech. Sgt. Matthew Gillett, non-commissioned officer in charge of the ESS, and his assistant, Staff Sgt. Joshua Modlin. Modlin explained the system is robust and constantly growing and that they are looking forward to working with contractors from BCF Solutions to continue to provide the best customer service and support possible.

There won’t be any immediate infrastructure changes, explained Modlin.

“We just went through an extensive infrastructure refresh, so our system is pretty robust,” he said. “The only difference that our 1,200 alarm custodians across the installation will experience is in who they call when they experience a problem that needs some sort of technical support.”

James Atkins, from the Cryptologic and Cyber Systems Division at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, Texas, is the contracting officer’s representative for the project. He explained that a unique aspect of the change in ESS management is the impetus on continuous system improvement.

He brought a team to Wright-Patterson AFB early in the process to help ensure a smooth implementation of the Fixed Site Sustainment-II contract. Atkins explained that the management change will give the ESS defenders a dedicated infrastructure maintenance management system to monitor and track alarm maintenance trends across the entire Air Force.

By tracking these data points the best system configurations can be determined and quickly implemented. The IMMS will also help identify problematic areas, so trending issues can be detected early and enterprise-wide solutions can be put in place at a much faster rate.

The SFS commander reiterated that due to the unique and critical research that happens throughout the installation, intrusion detection and asset security truly is a force multiplier for the entire Air Force.

“We take the mission of protecting our assets very seriously, and we’re confident that the new way of managing the ESS system will ensure our ability to accomplish that mission,” Rittgers said.

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High water blocks some roads; troopers urge driver safety

Published: Sunday, February 25, 2018 @ 1:54 AM
Updated: Sunday, February 25, 2018 @ 3:42 AM

Flooding causes driving concern in Miami Valley

Heavy rains made for tough driving conditions Saturday, but high water remains a concern through the weekend.

Lower lying and more rural roads are at a greater risk of flooding, such as Ohio 68 in Beavercreek, and Ohio 725, which is closed until further notice between Peniwit and Lower Bellbrook roads.

>> Swollen waterways prompt flood watch, warnings along Great Miami R., other spots

“We just want motorists to take a little extra time in planning where they want to go,” Sgt. Rod Murphy of the Ohio State Highway Patrol said.

Anyone planning to head out this morning should be aware of potential flooding that could block your way.

If you see standing water in the roadway, turn around, even if the water appears shallow.

“It’s not worth the risk. It’s better to just safely turn around and find another way,” Murphy said.

>> Kasich declares emergency over Ohio flooding

On wet roadways another concern is hydroplaning, when tires lose their grip on the pavement. Motorists in that situation are advised to “just let off the gas, slow down, and try to get to a safe area,” Murphy said.

Late Saturday and early Sunday there were reports of flooding throughout the Miami Valley.

3:27 a.m.: High water reported at Wilson Road between Fenner Road and OH-55.

3:05 a.m.: South Valley at US-35 is shut-down due to high water.

1:45 a.m.: April Lane at New Germany Trebien Road and Beavery Valley Road closed.

12:00 a.m.: Upper Bellbrook Road reported having high water.

12:00 a.m.: High water on US-68 and North at Sutton Road caused a vehicle slide off and a police cruiser was damaged.

11:30 p.m.: Hebble Creek was out of its banks in Fairborn in Greene County

11:17 p.m.: A flash flood in Lebanon in Warren County led to multiple road closures throughout the county due to high water, including Morrow-Milgrove Road, Lower Springboro and South Pioneer roads and Corwin Road.

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Father of CDC employee missing 10 days says disappearance 'not normal'

Published: Thursday, February 22, 2018 @ 10:56 PM

Timothy Jerrell Cunningham
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Timothy Jerrell Cunningham(Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

Timothy Jerrell Cunningham called out of work sick at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 10 days ago and hasn’t been heard from since, police say.

>> Read more trending news

His father, Terrell Cunningham, said something must be wrong. 

When the 35-year-old’s parents arrived in Atlanta from Maryland, they used a spare key to enter the house and found Timothy’s car, keys, wallet and phone, WSB-TV reported

"It's not the type of news you want to hear,” Terrell Cunningham said. “Your child is missing. Thirty-five years old, but always your child."

The father said his son is an accomplished man who graduated from Morehouse and earned a master’s degree and doctorate from Harvard University. As an epidemic intelligence officer, Timothy Cunningham has been deployed for public health emergencies, including superstorm Sandy, Ebola and Zika. 

It’s unusual for him not to contact family, his father said.

"This is not normal,” Terrell Cunningham said. “This is definitely out of the ordinary."

Family and friends hope the missing man will be found safe. 

Timothy Cunningham is 6 feet tall and weighs about 200 pounds. He has black hair and brown eyes.

Anyone with information on his whereabouts is asked to call 911.

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$10K reward offered for information in case of missing CDC employee

Published: Sunday, February 25, 2018 @ 3:38 AM

Timothy Jerrell Cunningham
Timothy Jerrell Cunningham

The family of a missing Centers for Disease Control and Prevention worker has partnered with Crime Stoppers to offer a reward for information in the case.

>> Watch the news report here

Timothy Cunningham, 35, was reported missing Feb. 16 after he called in sick to work Feb. 12 and has not been seen or heard from since, according to Atlanta police.

>> Father of CDC employee missing 10 days says disappearance 'not normal'

Police said Cunningham's parents went to his home and found his wallet along with several other belongings.

Police said Saturday that they have not been able to locate Cunningham, and they are asking for the public's help.

"This is an appeal to the public. Anyone who has seen Tim, or may know anything about his whereabouts, we're seeking your help in bringing Tim back safe to us," Cunningham's father, Terrel Cunningham, said.

>> Read more trending news 

Cunningham's family and Crime Stoppers are offering a $10,000 reward for any information that leads to an arrest and indictment in the case. Police said that at this time they do not have any evidence of foul play, but it is their practice to explore any and every possibility in a case such as this one.

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DP&L: Power restored to over 2,500 in Beavercreek

Published: Sunday, February 25, 2018 @ 1:46 AM
Updated: Sunday, February 25, 2018 @ 3:21 AM

UPDATE @ 3:20 a.m.:

Power was restored to the Beavercreek area, according to the DP&L Outage Map.

It is not known what caused the outage. 

INITIAL REPORT:

DP&L crews are working on restoring power to over 2,500 customers Sunday. 

>>NEW DETAILS: Police allege Fairborn student named classmates he wanted to kill

A mainline feeder de-energized and locked out, forcing several in Beavercreek, Research Park area and customers off North Fairfield Road to lose power around 12:30 a.m., according to Director of Operations for DP&L Kelly Milhouse.

Crews are working to identify the cause. There is no estimated time for when customer’s power will be restored, Milhouse said.

Got a tip? Call our monitored 24-hour line, 937-259-2237, or send it to newsdesk@cmgohio.com

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