Internal Medicine keeps pilots flying, improves research

Published: Friday, October 13, 2017 @ 10:00 AM


            Staff Sgt. Jonathon Lee, pulmonary technician with the Aeromedical Consultation Service Internal Medicine Branch, conducts a demonstration of a pulmonary function test for forced vital capacity as Staff Sgt. Sean O’Neill sits in a pressurized cabin awaiting the command to exhale. The branch reviews around 700 requests for waiver recommendation cases annually concerning pilots, navigators and other aircrew, with 90 percent of them receiving waiver recommendations. (U.S. Air Force photo/John Harrington)
Staff Sgt. Jonathon Lee, pulmonary technician with the Aeromedical Consultation Service Internal Medicine Branch, conducts a demonstration of a pulmonary function test for forced vital capacity as Staff Sgt. Sean O’Neill sits in a pressurized cabin awaiting the command to exhale. The branch reviews around 700 requests for waiver recommendation cases annually concerning pilots, navigators and other aircrew, with 90 percent of them receiving waiver recommendations. (U.S. Air Force photo/John Harrington)

EDITORS NOTE: This is the second part of a four-part series on the Aeromedical Consultation Service at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. Part three will delve into how the ACS’ Neuropsychiatry branch keeps Air Force air crews in the fight. Part one is available at www.wpafb.af.mil/News/.

The Aeromedical Consultation Service at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base reviews more than 2,000 waiver recommendation requests for Air Force pilots, navigators and other air crew annually. A staff of approximately 80 Airmen at the ACS ensures aviators get back in the sky as soon as possible.

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“You know, these guys just want to fly,” said Lt. Col. Eddie Davenport, ACS Internal Medicine chief cardiologist. “Even after potentially life-threatening cardiac disease, these aviators push to get back in the cockpit – no excuses, no balking at deployments. Our hopeful goal is to safely get them back flying.”

Internal Medicine staff do that by diagnosing a wide range of health issues in cardiology, pulmonology, endocrinology, gastrointestinal and others, and determining the risk of those issues to safety of flight for air crews. A team of four general internists, two cardiologists, one pulmonologist and five technicians review studies, such as echocardiograms, stress tests and holter monitors in dealing with everything from asthma, arthritis and obstructive sleep apnea to diabetes, coronary disease and cancer.

The ACS publishes waiver guides that let waiver authorities, generally major commands, make informed decisions on what medical conditions can and cannot be waived, but there are always times when things turn grey.

“In cases that are confusing or unusual, they’re very likely to ask our opinion,” said Maj. Kevin Alford, ACS Internal Medicine Branch deputy chief and staff internist.

That equates to about 700 annual case reviews with more than 150 in-person evaluations for the Internal Medicine branch. The bar to receiving a waiver recommendation from Internal Medicine is high.

“We have a 1 percent rule,” Davenport said. “If there’s over a 1 percent chance of them suddenly having incapacitation while they’re flying, we don’t let them fly.”

But ACS staff ensure aviators are given the best chance possible to receive a waiver recommendation through not only a very detailed review of their medical data but tests that may go above and beyond the norm.

“We’re very thorough,” said Lt. Col. Dara Regn, ACS Internal Medicine Branch chief and staff pulmonologist. “We do additional tests that they may not do in the civilian world just to make sure that we are being thorough because this is a tremendous investment. It costs over $5 million to train someone to fly a heavy [aircraft] and $3 million for a high-performance fighter. They’re a person and an investment, so we do everything we can to keep them healthy and keep them flying.”

Remarkably, more than 90 percent of cases reviewed ultimately receive a recommendation for waiver from the Internal Medicine branch, with the waiver authority making the final decision to return them to flight. It’s a number that’s been climbing over the years.

“We have a lot of examples of where, if you looked 10 years ago at what we were doing from a waiver standpoint, we were a lot more restrictive,” Alford said. “We’ve been able to move to a waiver policy that allows more aviators to get back to doing their job by finding ways to do that safely. Part of that is advances in medicine but part of that is the work of people here and at other organizations to find those safe ways to monitor and maintain our aviators in their positions.”

Some of the things ACS Internal Medicine allows are unheard of in other nations.

“Conditions like bicuspid aortic valve or mitral valve prolapse, a lot of other countries in the world do not let those folks fly, which is largely based on expert opinion, but we do,” Davenport said. “The reason we do is because we used published data, as well as our own, to support their safety and then we watch them very closely. We get an echocardiogram or [some other] testing every year just to make sure they’re OK. If anything changes, then we take care of it before anything happens.”

This intense dedication to aviators is often appreciated by the waiver authorities.

“ACS is very important to Air Force Materiel Command,” said Daniel J. Huber, AFMC Aerospace Medicine Programs and Standards manager, who’s responsible for approximately 1,000 aircrew and air traffic controllers throughout seven bases. “The staff at the ACS is remarkable. AFMC’s Aeromedical Case Manager Jeannette Remy is always responsive to requests whether it be to expedite an appointment for someone deploying to checking on the status of an evaluation in progress. The physicians are readily available and responsive to the needs of the aeromedical community.”

ACS is part of the United States Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine, which itself is part of the 711th Human Performance Wing. The Internal Medicine branch staff have made efforts to work closely with the 711 HPW, such as in a recent study on the effect of aircraft ejections on aviators with osteoporosis, according to Davenport. In addition, the branch has recently worked with Naval Medical Research Unit Dayton and the U.S. Army on the pulmonary impacts of aviation, such as when rotary aircraft kick up dust in a deployed environment, according to Regn.

“This is something that we’ve really worked on for the last year or two, finding ways that we can collaborate with them to try and help them and also for them to help us to create research that helps us answer the challenging questions that we have,” Alford said.

In fact, the Internal Medicine branch is shifting more focus to research as its huge repository of information will allow for policy to be guided more by specific statistics vice expert opinion.

“We have 1.2 million EKGs on about 300,000 aircrew over 70 years time frame,” Davenport said. “We have every cardiac study done on every aviator since the inception of the Air Force, whether normal or abnormal. We follow every member from accession through retirement and use data to make policy. Right now, we’re combining databases and putting it into a more meaningful format for higher order analysis.”

Davenport began digitizing the studies when he first arrived at the ACS in 2009. Since then, he’s traveled the world discussing his early findings and the database’s importance. In 2010, he presented some data on a trip to Germany during a European flight surgeon’s course. He met with doctors from several other countries and proposed standing up a NATO Cardiology Working Group. Today, he co-chairs that group.

“I get e-mails from all over the world every day because we have the data to support every aeromedical cardiac recommendation,” Davenport said.

While the extent of the database’s impact is yet to be known, it’s already being felt.

“The continued research has definitely enhanced the capabilities of the aeromedical community and provided up-to-date treatment regimens for a wide variety of conditions,” Huber said. “Their work allows us to support our flying personnel with the overall goal to keep them flying safely and effectively.”

From ensuring capable pilots are able to climb back into cockpits to being a world leader in aeromedical internal medicine, the staff at the ACS Internal Medicine branch enjoy the opportunity to impact the Air Force mission of “Fly, Fight, Win.”

“It’s very rewarding because we do it not only on an individual patient level but also dealing with the major commands, dealing with headquarters and now on an international level to a lot of other countries who look to us and our opinions on how we care for our aviators,” Regn said. “That feels very impactful and rewarding.”

Regn, herself a co-chair on NATO working groups on pulmonology and sleep, says it’s the people of the ACS that makes the difference.

“I truly think that the people you work with make the work environment,” Regn said. “This group of people are super intelligent, very motivated and very mission-oriented. They truly exemplify the core values of service before self.”

Taco Bell is testing Kit Kat quesadillas at some locations

Published: Monday, October 23, 2017 @ 8:18 PM

Some Taco Bell restaurants in Wisconsin are testing quesadillas with Kit Kats instead of savory cheese and chicken.
Joshua Blanchard/Getty Images for Taco Bell/Getty Images for Taco Bell
Some Taco Bell restaurants in Wisconsin are testing quesadillas with Kit Kats instead of savory cheese and chicken.(Joshua Blanchard/Getty Images for Taco Bell/Getty Images for Taco Bell)

Taco Bell is no stranger to unique food mashups, and the latest menu item the fast-food restaurant is testing is no different.

According to Mashable, the chain is testing the Kit Kat Chocoladilla. As its name may imply, the product is a flour tortilla with broken bits of melted Kit Kats inside. Brand Eating was among the first to report the new item.

>> Read more trending news

A representative for Taco Bell confirmed the item to Mashable. It’s being sold for $1.

Before heading out to the nearest Taco Bell to sample the treat, it’s worth noting that it is only being tested at some locations in Wisconsin, where it’s been tested since Oct. 5. Testing will continue through mid-November. Other locations in the state have a Twix version, according to Brand Eating.

The item itself isn’t new to the chain. Taco Bell UK had the item last year.

The rep for Taco Bell told Mashable that “customer response” to the testing will determine if there will be Chocoladillas for all.

Brother could face death penalty in Warren County woman’s killing

Published: Monday, October 23, 2017 @ 12:55 PM
Updated: Monday, October 23, 2017 @ 3:10 PM


            Christopher Kirby, 38, was indicted on charges of aggravated murder, aggravated robbery, murder, attempted murder, felonious assault, grand theft and tampering with evidence.
Christopher Kirby, 38, was indicted on charges of aggravated murder, aggravated robbery, murder, attempted murder, felonious assault, grand theft and tampering with evidence.

The adoptive brother of a South Lebanon woman beaten to death on Sept. 15 at her home has been indicted on nine charges, including her murder, and could face the death penalty.

Christopher Kirby, 38, was indicted on charges of aggravated murder, aggravated robbery, murder, attempted murder, felonious assault, grand theft and tampering with evidence.

Deborah Power, 63, of South Lebanon, was pronounced dead from head injuries Sept. 15 at her home in South Lebanon. Newcomer Funeral Home in Dayton is handling the arrangements.

Her husband, Ronnie Power, was also badly beaten in the attack and remained in serious condition, Warren County Prosecutor David Fornshell said.

“It’s still to early to determine what type of recovery, if any, he’s going to have,” Fornshell said.

If convicted, Christopher Kirby could face the death penalty in connection with his sister’s beating death.

The grand jury “found probable cause that two capital specifications were satisfied, specifically (1) Kirby committed the aggravated murder of Debra Power as part of a course of conduct involving the purposeful attempt to kill two persons, and (2) Kirby was the principal offender in the aggravated murder of Debra Power while committing the offense of aggravated robbery. Therefore, Kirby could face the death penalty if he is convicted on the aggravated murder count, and either of the two capital specifications,” according to Fornshell.

RELATED: Warren County couple held on murder charges in relative’s beating

Kirby’s wife, Jacqueline Kirby, 30, is charged with tampering with evidence, receiving stolen property and misuse of credit cards, but not with the more serious murder, attempted muder and felonious assault charges.

“There was insufficient evidence as to her involvement,” Fornshell said Monday.

Both Deborah and Ronnie Power were beaten with a baseball bat that has been taken into evidence, the prosecutor added Monday.

MORE: 2 arrested in South Lebanon; Woman killed, man in critical condition

The Kirbys were living with the Powers and other people in the house at 59 W. Broadway in South Lebanon. Christopher Kirby was Deborah Power’s adoptive brother, according to Fornshell.

Christopher Kirby is accused of beating the Powers during a robbery undertaken to steal a purse and a cellphone, according to Fornshell.

Deborah Power had changed the pin numbers, suspecting the Kirbys were using them, Fornshell said Monday. The tampering with evidence charge alleges they threw away her purse and cellphone.

MORE: Indictment issued in Franklin stabbing

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Deborah Power was found under a blanket on Sept. 15 and “cold to the touch with blood underneath” by sheriff’s deputies called to a home just before midnight, according to a search warrant.

The Kirbys remained in the Warren County Jail, awaiting their arraignment at 9 a.m. Wednesday in Warren County Common Pleas Court.

One flown to hospital from scene of Champaign Co. multi-car crash

Published: Monday, October 23, 2017 @ 7:29 PM

Jim Pancoast, President and CEO of Premier Health, speaks during a christening of the new Careflight medical helicopter was held on the helipad of Miami Valley Hospital Wednesday, Sept. 3 in Dayton.  Michael Franz / Staff
HANDOUT
Jim Pancoast, President and CEO of Premier Health, speaks during a christening of the new Careflight medical helicopter was held on the helipad of Miami Valley Hospital Wednesday, Sept. 3 in Dayton. Michael Franz / Staff(HANDOUT)

A medical helicopter is responding to the scene of a three-car crash in Champaign County Monday evening.

Champaign County dispatchers said a crews were sent to the 4000 block of U.S. 68 in Urbana Twp. around 6:30 p.m. 

A semi is involved in the crash and at least one person is being flown from the scene. 

Dispatchers said it is unknown what led to the crash or how many victims are reported at the scene. 

A portion of U.S. 68 has reopened after briefly closing as crews responded. 

We will update this story with new details when available.

GOT A TIP? Call our monitored 24-hour line, 937-259-2237, or send it to newsdesk@cmgohio.com

12-year-old girl accused of setting 10-year-old brother on fire

Published: Monday, October 23, 2017 @ 5:06 PM

10-Year-Old Boy Allegedly Set On Fire By 12-Year-Old Sister

Police arrested a 12-year-old Alabama girl over the weekend after authorities said she set her younger brother on fire, according to multiple reports.

>> Read more trending news

Dothan police told WTVY that family members took the girl’s 10-year-old brother to the Southeast Alabama Medical Center on Friday night with serious burns on his body.

Police investigator James Harvey told the news station that investigators believe both siblings were at their family’s house when the 12-year-old girl “sprayed or poured hair spritz on her brother’s back and ignited the substance.”

Harvey told AL.com that another person was home when the incident occurred, but he could not elaborate.

“The girl was arrested and charged with first-degree assault,” Harvey told the Dothan Eagle. “At this time, due to her age, she has been released into her parents’ custody ... with mandatory guidelines and rules that must be followed by the Alabama Department of Human Resources. At a later date she will go before the Houston County Juvenile Courts.”

Because of the ages of the children, police declined to identify them.

Harvey declined to speculate on a motive behind the attack, although he told WTVY that it involved “foul play.”

The boy is expected to recover, AL.com reported.