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Franklin, Carlisle seek federal funds for major street projects

Published: Monday, October 23, 2017 @ 3:05 PM


            Franklin and Carlisle have submitted applications to the Miami Valley Regional Planning Commission to obtain federal funding for major street projects. FILE PHOTO
Franklin and Carlisle have submitted applications to the Miami Valley Regional Planning Commission to obtain federal funding for major street projects. FILE PHOTO

Franklin and Carlisle have submitted applications to the Miami Valley Regional Planning Commission to obtain federal funding for major street projects.

Franklin has submitted submit three applications for federal Fast Act funding to repave North and South Dixie Highway in 2019 and 2023. Carlisle will also be submitting similar applications to resurface Dayton-Oxford Road/Chautauqua Road.

RELATED: Paving prices ‘hurting’ some Butler County governments

For 2019, Franklin is seeking a grant for the first phase of resurfacing North Dixie Highway between Kenneth Koons Boulevard to Pennyroyal Road. The estimated cost of the project is $680,000 and the estimated city share is $188,750.

For 2023, the city is seeking funding for the second phase of the North Dixie Highway resurfacing project from Pennyroyal Road to the north corporation limit, according to Barry Conway, Franklin city engineer. The estimated cost of the project is $451,400, with the local share estimated at $131,600.

MORE: Middletown roads: 7 streets to be paved this fall

Also in funding year 2023, the city is planning to resurface South Dixie Highway between Riley Boulevard to the south corporation limit. The estimated cost of the project is $1.27 million with the local share estimated at $344,000.

In Carlisle, Village Manager Julie Duffy said the village is seeking federal funding for the resurfacing of Dayton-Oxford Road/Chautauqua Road. She said the estimated project cost is $250,120, with the village’s local share estimated at $76,124 for preliminary engineering, construction inspection and 20 percent of the construction costs.

Duffy said there is no state funding included in this project.

Man arrested after stealing idling car with toddler inside

Published: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 8:42 AM

D'Jerry Cassamajor faces several charges, including larceny of a motor vehicle, child abuse and kidnapping.
WSOCTV.com
D'Jerry Cassamajor faces several charges, including larceny of a motor vehicle, child abuse and kidnapping.(WSOCTV.com)

A man is accused of stealing a woman's car Thursday night with her 2-year-old son inside.

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D'Jerry Cassamajor faces several charges, including larceny of a motor vehicle, child abuse and kidnapping.

Police said Cassamajor stole the woman’s Hyundai Santa Fe after she left it running and walked into the Super Wok restaurant in north Charlotte to order food. 

After realizing her car and child were gone, the woman called friends and then 911.

“I seen a lady out there yelling and I caught the tail end of a car leaving,” one witness said. “She was worried like any mother should be..”

Officers said that after speeding away, Cassamajor wrecked the car a few blocks away, leaving the toddler in the snow.

Family members were already rushing to the crash scene and ultimately helped police make the arrest by holding Cassamajor down until officers arrived.

“As soon as we came down the street right here, he jumped out and we started chasing,” one family member said.

The Department of Social Services has been notified due to the fact that the child had been left in the car unattended.

“You don’t ever expect that to happen, but of course, you jump into to action mode because you think, ‘What if that was my child?’” a family member said.

Cassamajor is expected to face a judge on Monday.

The boy was not hurt, police said.

Crews continue to battle major fire at AK Steel in Middletown 

Published: Saturday, January 20, 2018 @ 8:58 AM

UPDATE @ 9:23 a.m: Crews continue to battle a massive fire at AK Steel in Middletown that occurred Saturday morning.

The address to the fire has been updated to the 3400 block of Lefferson Road, according to officials.

We are still working to learn details on the fire and will keep this story updated. 

INITIAL REPORT

Multiple fire crews are responding to the 1800 block of Crawford Street on a structure fire at AK Steele in Middletown, per initial reports. 

TRENDING: Government shutdown now official 

The incident was reported around 8:30 a.m., and is reportedly escalating.

We have a crew on the way to the scene and will update this story with additional details. 

College student dies after on-campus shooting at Wake Forest

Published: Saturday, January 20, 2018 @ 8:30 AM

Wake Fprest University.
Davis Turner/Getty Images
Wake Fprest University.(Davis Turner/Getty Images)

A 21-year-old student from Winston-Salem State University was shot and killed early Saturday after a fight broke out during a party at Wake Forest University, police said.

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The shooting occurred around 1 a.m., WXII reported. It took place on campus during a Delta Sigma Theta sorority party at The Barn, police said.

Najee Ali Baker, 21, was taken to the hospital with a gunshot wound, where he died, WXII reported.

Winston-Salem police said they responded to Wake Forest after receiving a call that a fight had occurred and a gun was fired on campus.

The Winston-Salem Police Department said they believe the shooter is no longer on campus and are looking for that person, WXII reported.

Government shutdown: What will close; will you get your Social Security check; what will happen to SNAP, WIC

Published: Thursday, January 18, 2018 @ 12:35 PM

What You Need to Know: Government Shutdown

Update: While the House passed legislation on Thursday to fund government  services, the Senate on Friday failed to vote on a continuing resolution that would keep the government up and running. With no bill to fund the government, non-essential services have been shutdown. 

Below is the original story that explains what will happen now that the government has been shut down.

The fight over a border wall, the fate of nearly 800,000 DACA recipients, and the wrangling over the funding of an insurance program for children could force a U.S. government shutdown after midnight on Friday if Congress does not pass legislation that would keep the government running.

While negotiations on a temporary spending bill, called a continuing resolution, are ongoing, House Republican leaders said late Wednesday that  they lacked the votes to prevent a shutdown, but that they are pressing members to back Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, (R-Wisconsin), on the  temporary spending bill.

“I think it passes,” Republican Study Committee Chairman Mark Walker, (R-North Carolina), told reporters on Wednesday. “I don’t think it’s overwhelming, but I think it passes.”

>>Read more trending news

What would happen if no bill is passed and the government “shuts down?” Here’s what to expect:

First, a government shutdown doesn’t mean the government completely shuts down. Employees and services deemed “essential” would remain in place. About half of the federal employee workforce, however, could be furloughed – sent home without pay.

Government agencies would shut down because of the lack of a bill that funds services those agencies provide. What Congress will be considering Thursday night and Friday is a continuing resolution, a way to temporarily fund the government.

What is a continuing resolution?
A continuing resolution, or “CR,” is legislation that funds government operations at the current spending level. In normal years, a bill that funds government operations is signed by Oct. 1, which is the end of the fiscal year. That didn’t happen this year.

CRs can fund the government for days, weeks or months. The CR that could be considered Thursday would fund the government through Feb. 16.

Here is a list of services and how they would be affected if a CR is not passed by Friday night:
Air travel
Air travel would not be affected as federal air traffic controllers would remain on the job and Transportation Security Administration screeners would remain in place.
Federal court
For about two weeks, federal courts would continue operating normally. After that time, the judiciary would have to furlough employees not considered essential.
Food safety
The Food and Drug Administration would handle high-risk recalls. Most routine safety inspections would be halted.
Health
Patients in the National Institutes of Health would continue to be treated. New patients would not be accepted until a funding bill is in place.
International travel 
You could still get a passport and visa applications would still be processed by the State Department. Fees collected when someone applies for a visa or a passport fund those services.
Loans 
The Federal Housing Administration, the agency that guarantees about 30 percent of all American home mortgages, wouldn't be able to underwrite or approve any new loans during a shutdown, causing a delay for those using one of those loans to purchase a home. 
The mail
You would still get mail, as the U.S. Postal Service is not funded by taxpayer dollars for everyday operations.
Military
Active-duty military personnel would stay on duty, but their paychecks would be delayed.
National parks
All national parks would be closed, as would the Smithsonian museums. Visitors in overnight campgrounds in national parks would be given 48 hours to make alternate arrangements and leave the park.
School lunches, SNAP and WIC
School breakfasts and lunches funded by the federal government would not be affected. The Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children, or WIC, could be affected. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, which used to be called the Food Stamp Program, would continue to be funded and SNAP benefits would continue to be distributed. But several smaller feeding programs would not have the money to operate.
Science
The National Weather Service would keep forecasting weather.
Social Security
Social Security, Medicare and unemployment benefits would be paid, but new applications for those payments could be delayed. 
Veterans services
Most services offered through the Department of Veterans Affairs would continue.

Sources: The Associated Press; Politicothe Congressional Research Service