Education raises awareness of warning signs

Published: Friday, October 06, 2017 @ 11:11 AM


            Did you know there’s a DOD reporting option that allows you to get help and also maintain privacy? Learn which reporting option is best for you. If you’re experiencing domestic abuse, seek help. Services are available and you don’t have to sacrifice your privacy. Visit www.militaryonesource.mil/-/domestic-abuse-military-reporting-options to learn about your options. (Graphic courtesy militaryonesource.mil)
Did you know there’s a DOD reporting option that allows you to get help and also maintain privacy? Learn which reporting option is best for you. If you’re experiencing domestic abuse, seek help. Services are available and you don’t have to sacrifice your privacy. Visit www.militaryonesource.mil/-/domestic-abuse-military-reporting-options to learn about your options. (Graphic courtesy militaryonesource.mil)

For the past 36 years, October has been designated as Domestic Violence Awareness Month. The purpose of this observance is to provide education to communities, individuals, couples and families concerning Family Advocacy Program services and other community resources that can help prevent, raise awareness of community responsibility and provide resources for addressing domestic abuse.

“The Wright-Patterson Air Force Base Family Advocacy Program provides services to prevent abuse, promote early identification and reporting, provide treatment to offenders, and support for victims,” said Beverley Knight-Stukenborg, Family Advocacy Outreach manager at the 88th Medical Operations Squadron.

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“No relationship is perfect. But it’s important to be aware of unhealthy behaviors which can lead to domestic abuse – emotional, economic, sexual and physical. Abuse can happen to anyone regardless of age, gender or economic status,” she said.

Even simple actions can help those at risk for abuse. For instance, learning about the warning signs of abuse and reporting options that are available is equally important, said Knight-Stukenborg.

“Deciding whether to report domestic abuse can be difficult. Victims of domestic abuse may feel confused, alone or afraid to get help. If your partner is abusive, knowing your reporting options may help you decide what’s best for you and your family,” she added.

There are two options for reporting abuse. Restricted reporting is for those who want victim advocacy services, medical care or counseling but do not want an official investigation. Reports must be made to a Family Advocacy Program manager, military health care provider, domestic abuse victim advocate or clinical treatment provider.

Unrestricted reporting is for those who want to pursue an official investigation through command, Family Advocacy Program or law enforcement. All reports of child abuse will be investigated.

Several Domestic Violence Awareness Month events and activities are scheduled this month across the installation and at local community events, including activities at the Air Force Institute of Technology, 88th Force Support Squadron, 88th Medical Group, the base commissary, the Family Violence Prevention Center Candlelight Vigil, Retiree Appreciation Day, Dayton YWCA and the Artemis Center Benefit Breakfast.

There is also a Domestic Violence Awareness Month poster campaign this month with posters displayed at units across the installation. DVAM activities are also being held during unit commander’s calls and wingman day events.

“Domestic violence is never OK,” Knight-Stukenborg said.

For free, confidential support, information or referrals, contact Family Advocacy at 937-257-4608. For domestic violence emergencies, call 911. For more information, visit www.militaryonesource.mil or call the Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-548-2722.

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Study: Common household chore just as damaging as smoking 20 cigarettes a day

Published: Saturday, February 17, 2018 @ 10:05 AM

A new study reveals common cleaning sprays could be harmful to your lungs. Women who cleaned as little as once a week had an accelerated lung decline risk. For women, using cleaning products for 20 years is equivalent to smoking 20 cigarettes a day. Men who cleaned did not see the same decline as women who cleaned. Scientists said cleaning chemicals irritate the mucous membranes that line the airways. Researchers suggests looking for products that are labeled "allergy friendly."

Love to keep a tidy home? The chemicals in common cleaning sprays could be detrimental to your respiratory system, according to a new report. 

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Researchers from universities in Norway recently conducted a study, published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, to determine how cleaners may contribute to lung decline over time. 

"While the short-term effects of cleaning chemicals on asthma are becoming increasingly well-documented, we lack knowledge of the long-term impact," senior author Cecile Svanes said in a statement. "We feared that such chemicals, by steadily causing a little damage to the airways day after day, year after year, might accelerate the rate of lung function decline that occurs with age."

For their assessment, the researchers examined the lungs of more than 6,200 women and men from 22 health institutions, following them over a course of 20 years. During that time span, the participants were asked if they cleaned their homes and if they were professional cleaners. If so, they were also required to record how much they used typical liquid cleaning products. 

After analyzing the results, they found that women who cleaned as little as once a week had an accelerated lung decline risk. In fact, they said using cleaning products for 20 years is equivalent to smoking 20 cigarettes a day for 10 to 20 years for women. Men who cleaned did not see the same decline as women who cleaned.

The scientists said they were initially shocked by the results. "However, when you think of inhaling small particles from cleaning agents that are meant for cleaning the floor and not your lungs, maybe it is not so surprising after all," they wrote.

They believe the cleaning chemicals irritate the mucous membranes that line the airways, which causes damage. To lower the risk, the British Lung Foundation suggests looking for products that are labeled "allergy friendly" as they have fewer chemicals. 

While the researchers acknowledge their study included very few people who did not clean, they said their findings are strong. 

"The take-home message of this study is that in the long run cleaning chemicals very likely cause rather substantial damage to your lungs," they wrote. "These chemicals are usually unnecessary; microfiber cloths and water are more than enough for most purposes.”

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Man arrested 18th time for indecent exposure, police say

Published: Saturday, February 17, 2018 @ 1:03 PM

Shawn Noble
Nebraska Sex Offender Registry
Shawn Noble(Nebraska Sex Offender Registry)

A Nebraska man has been arrested for the 18th time for indecent exposure, authorities said.

The latest incident took place Thursday at an Omaha food court, KETV reported.

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Witnesses told KETV that Shawn Noble, 39, was yelling obscenities when he emerged from the food court restroom completely naked. When the property manager ordered him back into the bathroom to put on his clothes, he lunged at her, witnesses said.

Food court employees were able to barricade Noble inside the restroom until police arrived, KETV reported. Noble was charged with indecent exposure and disorderly conduct and taken to the Douglas County Jail.

Noble, a lifetime registered sex offender and transient, has over 30 arrests, including 17 previous arrests for alleged indecent exposure, KETV reported. He recently completed a six-month jail sentence for a 2017 indecent exposure conviction, according to court documents reviewed by KETV.

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Chance wintry mix today; warmer next week

Published: Saturday, February 17, 2018 @ 5:54 AM
Updated: Saturday, February 17, 2018 @ 10:20 AM

Chance wintry mix today followed by a warmer and drier Sunday.

Clouds thicken through the morning with a chance of rain and snow showers to develop from the south. Highs will be in the upper 30s. Rain and snow showers push through during the evening before ending into the night. Little or no snow accumulation is expected. Overnight lows fall into the upper 20s. Isolated slick spots possible.

  • Chance for passing rain/snow showers Saturday
  • Sunshine and milder for Sunday
  • Rain, potential for flooding returns next week

Sunday: Becoming mostly sunny through mid-afternoon before clouds return. Highs will be warmer, climbing into the upper 40s. Rain is expected to develop at night.

Monday: Rain showers likely, but mild with highs in the lower 60s. It will be a bit breezy at times during the day.

Tuesday: It will likely rain with a chance for a few thunderstorms. It will be breezy and unseasonably warm. Highs will top out near 70 degrees.

Wednesday: Rain will be likely in the morning and then taper off with lingering clouds. It will turn cooler with early highs in the upper 50s.

Snow at UD

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Texas man accused of possessing 8,000 hits of LSD

Published: Saturday, February 17, 2018 @ 12:27 PM

American-Statesman staff
American-Statesman staff

A Texas man has been accused of possessing 8,000 hits of LSD. Cody Wayne Wahrmund, 31, was indicted Thursday for possession of a controlled substance, a first-degree felony punishable by up to 99 years in prison, according to an indictment issued Thursday.

A Cedar Park police officer stopped Wahrmund in his vehicle Oct. 1 for a defective rear tail light, according to an arrest affidavit reviewed by the Austin American-Statesman.

READ: Man arrested with $112K worth of meth in South Austin hotel

When the officer spoke to Wahrmund, the officer noticed a pipe with what appeared to be marijuana residue inside of it hanging from a walking stick in the back seat of Wahrmund’s vehicle, the affidavit said.

The affidavit said the officer searched the car and found methamphetamine inside a pill bottle. The affidavit does not include any information about where the LSD, otherwise known as acid, was found, the Statesman reported.

Wahrmund was released Oct. 1 from the Williamson County Jail after posting bail, which was set at $8,000.

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