Dayton icon Mikesell’s scores shout-out from national foodie magazine

Published: Wednesday, March 07, 2018 @ 8:00 AM

Mikesell’s scores shoutout from national foodie magazine

The 108-year-old Mikesell’s Snack Food Company has scored a tasty little shout-out from a national foodie magazine for its legendary potato chips.  

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“Nothing improves a sandwich like a bag of potato chips,” proclaims Bon Appetit magazine on page 62 of its current March 2018 issue, before adding, “It’s even better when those potato chips are culty regional brands.”

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The magazine then includes Mikesell’s among seven brands identified as “some of our favorites.” It was the only Ohio chip-maker to make the list. 

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Mikesell’s has found a way to survive as a regional snack-maker in the face of intense competition from international mega-brands, including Frito-Lay, and other regional brands that seek to capture market share in southwest Ohio.

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The Dayton-based company inspires unshakable loyalty from a healthy portion of Miami Valley residents. Although it sells its chips and other snacks in a handful of other states, Mikesell’s market penetration has always been highest in and around the Miami Valley. A decade ago, Mikesell’s potato chips were voted “Dayton’s Signature Dish” by Dayton Daily News readers.

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The company makes its chips and snacks in Dayton and at a second facility in Indianapolis.

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Woman, 61, fatally injured in crash on U.S. 36 in Champaign County

Published: Wednesday, March 21, 2018 @ 4:00 PM
Updated: Wednesday, March 21, 2018 @ 7:38 PM

At least one dead in Champaign Co. crash involving ambulance

UPDATE @ 7:20 p.m.: A 61-year-old Kenton woman was killed in the two-vehicle collision involving a private ambulance and a full-size pickup truck in Goshen Twp., the Champaign County Sheriff's Office said in a statement. 

Debra Lock was a front-seat passenger in the Med Care ambulance sheriff's investigators said failed to yield the right of way when it entered the intersection of U.S. 36 East and Parkview Road. The accident was reported at 3:22 p.m.

Matthew Wallen, 21, of St. Paris, was driving the truck that struck the medic unit. 

Jeremy Fetters, 23, of Plain City, was the ambulance driver. Also in the ambulance were Mark Stith, 23, of Marion, and Christopher Bopp, 51, also of Kenton. 

Wallen, Fetters, Stith and Bopp were all taken to Miami Valley Hospital in two CareFlight helicopters. Their conditions were not available Wednesday night.

Lock died at the scene. She was removed by Champaign County Coroner Josh Richards.

RAW VIDEO: 1 dead, 5 other injured in Champaign Co. crash involving ambulance

OTHER LOCAL NEWS: CJ alerts parents to KKK-style hood brought to school

Mechanicsburg Fire Lt. Matt Bebout said the sheriff's office is continuing to investigate where the medic unit may have been going or coming from at the time of the accident. The sheriff's office also is looking into whether the medic unit's lights and sirens were activated.

The accident investigation is continuing, according to the sheriff’s office.

OTHER LOCAL NEWS: Driver sentenced to maximum term in fatal crash

A Pioneer Electric crew was on scene Wednesday evening to repair a utility pole the medic unit also struck in the collision.

Both roadways were shut down for a time because of the investigation.

Contributed by Jacki Anderson via Facebook.
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You don’t have to #DeleteFacebook: 7 tips to lock down your privacy without leaving 

Published: Wednesday, March 21, 2018 @ 5:25 PM

What You Need to Know: Christopher Wylie

Facebook is under fire following this week’s revelation that data company Cambridge Analytica acquired data from millions of Facebook users without their knowledge. The news prompted a #DeleteFacebook social media campaign urging users to say goodbye to the platform once and for all.

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But leaving Facebook isn’t that simple. Luckily, you don’t have to delete the platform altogether to ensure your data is safe.

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Here are seven tips to lock down your privacy without leaving social media entirely:

Download your Facebook data to see exactly what they know about you.

If you’re concerned about the information you have out there, Facebook allows users to download a copy of their own data, including archived posts, messages and advertisements you’ve clicked on, according to Digital Trends.

How: General Account Settings --> Download a copy of your Facebook data --> Start My Archive.

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Check the third-party apps connected to your account.

Under General Account Settings, click on the Apps page to see a list of apps you’ve connected to your Facebook account. If you see an app you’re wary of, hover over it and delete it immediately.

Opt out of Facebook API sharing altogether.

On the same page as the Apps, scroll down until you see Apps, Websites and Plugins. Hit Edit to Disable Platform. This will sign you out of all websites, apps and other services connected to your Facebook account.

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Log out of Facebook when you’re not using it.

It’s a simple rule, but how often do you actually log out? According to Tom’s Guide, if you leave your Facebook logged in on your computer, it can still track your movements and share your information with advertisers and other parties.

Adjust your ad settings or delete interests to prevent ad targeting.

Under General Account Settings, scroll down to the Ads page and click on Your Interests. On this page, Facebook uses the selection of interests across a variety of categories, including entertainment, news, hobbies and more to determine what ads you’ll see. You can hover over a selection to delete an interest, or, you can scroll down to Ad Settings.

Under Ad Settings, you have the option of adjusting:

- Ads based on your use of websites and apps (Can you see online interest-based ads from Facebook?)

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- Ads on apps and websites off of the Facebook Companies (Can your Facebook ad preferences be used to show you ads on devices such as computers, mobile devices and connected TVs?)

- Ads with your social actions (Who can see your social actions paired with ads?)

Limit who can see your posts, friends list and more under privacy settings.

Under General Account Settings, click Privacy. There, you can limit who sees your future posts, your friends list or who can look you up using the email used on Facebook. You can also click on Timeline and Tagging Settings to adjust preferences for who can post on your timeline, see what posts are on your timeline and more.

Turn off location services.

>> Related: Facebook can now find you in photos you’re not tagged in

Turn off location data to limit Facebook’s access and ensure your own physical safety. You can do so by going to General Account Settings --> Location. Check your location services preferences on your smartphone as well.

The Facebook and WhatsApp app icons are displayed on an iPhone. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

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Fired NBA worker sues, claims discrimination against white employees

Published: Wednesday, March 21, 2018 @ 8:12 PM

(Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)
Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images
(Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)(Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)

A fired Atlanta Hawks employee is suing the organization, alleging it discriminated against white employees and terminated her when she complained. 

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In a lawsuit filed Friday, Margo Kline says Hawks external affairs director David Lee, who is black, promoted a culture of discrimination against white people, especially white women. Kline, who is white, worked in the NBA team’s corporate social responsibility department as a community development coordinator for five years.

Kline alleges that Lee was dismissive and exclusionary toward white employees and would often make jokes about “white culture,” hiring and promoting black employees — who Kline said were less qualified — over white people, according to the lawsuit. 

Kline said the organization ignored her complaints and instead unfairly scrutinized her work and impeded her ability to do her job, often gossiping and ridiculing her. The lawsuit also alleges white coworkers were told not to speak with Kline or they could lose their job. 

The Hawks fired Kline in March 2017, three weeks after a final written warning regarding her conduct and performance, according to the lawsuit. Kline, who said she had never been written up before, claims she repeatedly asked for ways she could improve but was ignored.  

Kline filed an employment discrimination charge with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, who gave her a notice of her right to sue in December. 

She is asking for punitive damages and a trial jury. 

In a statement to The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, the Hawks said: “We take all claims of discrimination seriously and have performed a thorough review of these baseless claims. The case was quickly dismissed at the EEOC level. We deny these claims and will vigorously defend against them.”

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20 bullets fired: Police kill unarmed black man holding cellphone in own backyard

Published: Wednesday, March 21, 2018 @ 3:56 PM

Unarmed Black Man Killed In Own Backyard By Police While Holding Cellphone

Family, friends and the Sacramento community are demanding answers in the death of an unarmed black man killed by police in his own backyard Sunday night, holding nothing but a cellphone in his hand.

Sacramento Police Chief Daniel Hahn told Fox40 that officers fired on Stephon Alonzo “Zoe” Clark a total of 20 times. Clark, 23, died at the scene, leaving behind two young sons. 

Hahn was on hand Tuesday night at a City Council meeting, where several residents of the community protested the officer-involved shooting. 

“To hell with Sac PD,” resident Rebecca Person said, according to the news station. “I’m sick of them always murdering black youth.”

“What is the police’s job to do? To shoot people that are unarmed in their own backyard?” another resident, Robert Copeland, asked. 

Fox40 reported that the Sacramento Police Department is under fire for its morphing story of what Clark was carrying. 

“They put one story out that he may have been armed. They put out another that he had a toolbar, whatever that is,” Tanya Faison, a member of the Sacramento chapter of Black Lives Matter, told the news station. “Then they put out that he had a wrench and then they put out that he just had a cellphone. 

“They need to get it together.”

The two officers involved in the shooting are being criticized for waiting five minutes, until additional officers came to the scene, to handcuff Clark and begin rendering first aid.

Department officials are also facing criticism for not promptly informing Clark’s family, including the grandparents and siblings he lived with, that he was the one gunned down in their yard. 

Fox40 reported that Clark’s family called 911 for help after hearing gunshots right outside their window. 

Sequita Thompson, Clark’s grandmother, told the Sacramento Bee that she was sitting in her dining room when she heard the shots.

“The only thing that I heard was, ‘pow, pow, pow, pow,’ and I got to the ground,” Thompson told the newspaper

Thompson described crawling to where her 7-year-old granddaughter slept on a couch in an adjacent den, where she got the girl onto the floor. She then made her way to her husband, who uses a wheelchair, and he dialed 911. 

Thompson said neither she nor her husband heard officers issue any commands prior to firing the fatal gunshots. 

The grieving grandmother told the Bee that investigators interviewed her for hours about what she heard, but never told her it was her grandson who had been killed. She finally looked out a window and saw his body.

“I opened that curtain and he was dead. I started screaming,” Thompson said

Sequita Thompson points to the white area on her family's patio where she said her grandson, 23-year-old Stephon Clark, lay dead after being shot Sunday, March 18, 2018, by police in Sacramento, Calif. Relatives, activists and Sacramento officials are questioning why officers shot at an unarmed black man 20 times, killing him, when he turned out to be holding only a cellphone in his own backyard.((Renee C. Byer/The Sacramento Bee via AP))

Hahn said he and his investigators initially had no idea Clark was related to the homeowners. 

“We found out they were related because the family told us so,” the chief told Fox40.

Hahn said in a news release Monday that officers were called to the family’s neighborhood around 9:15 p.m. Sunday on a report of a man breaking several car windows. The suspect was described as a thin man, just over 6 feet in height and wearing a black hoodie and dark pants. The caller said the man was hiding in a backyard.

Dispatchers sent officers to the scene, where the Sacramento County Sheriff’s Department also had a helicopter searching for the suspect from the air, the news release said. About 12 minutes after the 911 call was made, the crew in the helicopter told officers on the ground they saw the alleged suspect in a backyard, where he picked up what looked like a toolbar and broke the sliding glass door of the home before running south toward the front of the house. 

That house was next door to the Thompsons’ home.

The officers on the ground, directed to his location by the helicopter crew, confronted Clark as he came up along the side of his grandparents’ home, the news release said. When they ordered him to show his hands, he fled to the backyard, officials said. 

“Officers pursued the suspect and located him in the backyard of the residence,” the news release said. “The suspect turned and advanced towards the officers while holding an object which was extended in front of him.”

Believing the object was a gun, the officers opened fire, the news release said. Clark was struck multiple times, though the exact number of gunshot wounds was not immediately known.

A follow-up news release issued later Monday stated that no weapon was found near Clark’s body.

“After an exhaustive search, scene investigators did not locate any firearms,” the news release stated. “The only item found near the suspect was a cellphone.”

Homicide investigators and crime scene technicians said they found three vehicles with damage they believe Clark caused, as well as the shattered sliding glass door that the helicopter crew said they witnessed him break, the news release said

The only items investigators found that could have been the toolbar described by the helicopter crew included a cinder block and a piece of aluminum that may have come from a gutter. Both were found near the broken sliding glass door, the Bee reported

Both officers involved in the shooting have been placed on administrative leave, the newspaper said. One of the officers has eight years of law enforcement experience, half of it with the Sacramento department. 

The other officer has six years total experience, two of those in Sacramento. 

Sacramento city policy requires any body-camera footage of an officer-involved shooting to be made public within 30 days, the Bee reported

Hahn said he plans to release the officers’ body camera footage, as well as footage from a camera aboard the helicopter, after it has been shared with Clark’s family, Fox40 reported. He anticipated having the footage released by week’s end. 

The Sacramento County District Attorney’s Office, the city attorney’s office and the city’s Office of Public Safety Accountability are investigating the shooting, as is the department’s homicide and internal affairs units. 

The Bee reported that Clark was at least the 17th person to die in confrontations with law enforcement in Sacramento County in the past two years. Besides the young father, three others were unarmed. 

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