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Ohio gun law that takes effect today continues state loosening of gun restrictions

Published: Saturday, March 11, 2017 @ 8:00 AM
Updated: Tuesday, March 21, 2017 @ 2:32 PM

Gun laws go into effect today

The state of Ohio’s newest gun law takes effect Tuesday, March 21. 

Known as Senate Bill 199, the law overrules private business owners’ ability to ban guns on their property as long as person is a CCW license holder and locks the weapon — handguns only in this case — in his or her personal vehicle.

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The law does not set requirements for how the weapon is stored except that the vehicle must be locked.

Since state lawmakers first made it legal to carry concealed weapons in 2004, the law has repeatedly been broadened in Ohio, with a number of changes made just in the last couple of years.

In 2006, local governments were banned from enacting laws regulating firearms or ammunition.

In 2008, the so-called “castle doctrine” law was approved, presuming that a person using lethal force against someone unlawfully entering their home or vehicle is acting in self-defense.

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Members of the armed services or National Guard who are between the ages of 18 and 21 were allowed to purchase or possess handguns as long as they had handgun training beginning in 2009.

And the years 2011 and 2012 saw multiple changes. Those with concealed-carry weapons licenses (CCW) were permitted to bring handguns into bars and restaurants as long as the person with the gun doesn’t drink alcohol. They were allowed to keep loaded handguns in cars without the gun being in a holster, case or locked container. Restrictions were lifted on the purchase and possession of firearms by people with certain criminal convictions. CCW reciprocity was expanded with other states. And firearms were allowed in a locked vehicle at the State Underground Parking Garage at the State Capitol or the Riffe Center for Government and the Arts in Columbus.

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In 2014, the used of sound suppressors — commonly known as silencers — were approved for hunting. Also, the number of hours of training required to obtain a CCW license was reduced from 12 hours to eight.

Students hold dummy guns in a basic “First Shots” introductory firearms course taught by Jim Kokaly, a NRA certified instructor, on Jan. 24, 2013, at Sim Trainer in Moraine. CHRIS STEWART / STAFF(Chris Stewart/Staff Writer)

The newest law

SB 199 also provides immunity to the business or property owner and the employer in any lawsuit filed for injury or death caused by a person who stores a firearm or ammunition in a personal vehicle unless the “business or person intentionally solicited or procured the other person’s injurious actions,” according to the Ohio Legislative Service Commission.

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Here are some of the other provisions of SB 199:

  • Day care centers, which had been prohibited from allowing guns on their property, now can now choose to allow guns inside their buildings.
  • Government officials and university and college boards of trustees also can vote to allow permit holders to carry concealed weapons. State law had already widened the CCW rights to include government parking lots.
  • Senate Bill 199 also makes it legal for active duty members of the U.S. armed forces to carry a concealed handgun without getting a state permit as long as the person is carrying a valid military ID and proof of specific firearms training.
  • Federal property — such as the U.S. Postal Service or military installations such as Wright-Patterson Air Force Base — is generally not covered by the law.

PHOTOS: Residents respond to new law allowing handguns on private property

The final bill included changes in a House bill sponsored by then-State Rep. Ron Maag, R-Salem Twp. Maag said his bill was more concerned with loosening CCW rules in school zones, but he does not have a problem with allowing employees to bring guns to work and leave them in their cars.

RELATED: Despite new gun law, state firearms group won’t pressure colleges

“I don’t think too many employees will have too many problems with it,” Maag said.

But the drumbeat of gun laws — all designed to loosen restrictions — has angered gun control advocates, who say the legislation has done nothing to make communities safer.

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“There are a number of factors that influence whether or not gun violence occurs. The biggest one is whether or not there is a gun around,” said Jennifer Thorne, executive director of the Ohio Coalition Against Gun Violence. “When we have increased access to these kinds of deadly weapons there is an increased chance for deadly events to happen.”


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Police: Man shoots self, runs to mother’s house blocks away in Dayton

Published: Friday, March 23, 2018 @ 7:31 PM
Updated: Saturday, March 24, 2018 @ 3:35 AM


UPDATE @ 3:05 a.m.:

The man who said he shot himself Friday night in Dayton has been identified.

>>Deputies: Man stabbed while walking in Jefferson Twp.

David Metcalf, 51, said he shot himself in the arm at his residence in the 2800 block of East Third Street then ran to his mother’s house, according to police.

Police recovered ammunition and suspected cocaine at Metcalf’s home following further investigation, a release stated.

It remains unknown if the man did shoot himself.


A man who was shot in the arm tonight ran inside his mother’s house.

Police and medics were called around 6:35 p.m. to the 3100 block of East Third Street after a woman said her son was shot and was bleeding profusely.

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He was taken by medics to Miami Valley Hospital with injuries that were not life-threatening, police said.

The man told police he shot himself in the 2800 block of East Third Street, according to the Montgomery County Regional Dispatch Center. The area outside a home near the corner of East Third and Jersey streets was surrounded in yellow police tape.

The man’s name and age were not available.

A woman inside a residence where the shooting happened had a broken nose, and police said it’s under investigation whether the man shot himself.

Got a tip? Call our 24-hour monitored line, 937-259-2237, or send it to

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Flames shooting from vacant house in Dayton

Published: Friday, March 23, 2018 @ 11:12 PM

Flames were shooting from the two-story house when crews were called around 11 p.m. to 917 Lorain Ave.

Crews were called late Friday night to a fire at a vacant house.

Flames were shooting from the two-story house when crews were called around 11 p.m. to 917 Lorain Ave.

We are on the way and will update this report as we learn details.

Got a tip? Call our 24-hour monitored line, 937-259-2237, or send it to

Viewer video, submitted by Mike Lear via Facebook.

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Deputies: Man stabbed while walking in Jefferson Twp.

Published: Friday, March 23, 2018 @ 11:53 PM

Police are searching for a suspect who stabbed a man Friday night as he was was walking on Maeder Avenue.

The Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office was dispatched around 9:35 p.m. to the 20 block of Maeder Avenue, just off West Third St.

>> Man tells police he shot himself before running to his mother’s house blocks away

The victim was taken to Miami Valley Hospital. The stab would is not life-threatening, deputies said.

The incident remains under investigation.

Got a tip? Call our 24-hour monitored line, 937-259-2237, or send it to

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UPDATE: Owner of malnourished dogs charged with animal cruelty in Butler County

Published: Friday, March 23, 2018 @ 9:35 AM
Updated: Friday, March 23, 2018 @ 9:00 PM

The Butler County Dog Warden & Humane Officers are reaching out to the community via Facebook to find the owners of two emaciated dogs. VIA DOG WARDEN FACEBOOK
The Butler County Dog Warden & Humane Officers are reaching out to the community via Facebook to find the owners of two emaciated dogs. VIA DOG WARDEN FACEBOOK

UPDATE @ 9 p.m.

The owner of two emaciated dogs was arrested Friday night and charged with animal cruelty, according to Butler County Dog Warden & Humane Officers.

The “finder” of the dogs turned out to be the owner of the two female dogs that were brought Thursday morning by animal control officers to the Animal Friends Humane Society.

Butler County Sheriff Richard Jones identified 42-year-old Brian Trauthwein as the owner of the two dogs: Porche, a fawn/white boxer; and Chloe, a black/white pit bull mix.


The Butler County Dog Warden & Humane Officers are reaching out to the community via Facebook to find the owners of two emaciated dogs.

The two dogs are female and appear to be older. One of the two appears to be extremely malnourished. They were found Thursday in the 1000 Block of Franklin Street in Hamilton.

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“These dogs are safe at the Humane Society and are receiving medical treatment, but they have a long way to go,” the warden posted to Facebook.

One of the dogs needs timed feeding and monitoring and is receiving special treatment and care at the home of a deputy dog warden, the post said.

Those who feel they have information on who the owner is of either dog are asked to contact Supervisor Kurt Merbs at 513-785-6542.

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