breaking news


 No indictment in Dayton police-involved shooting

Published: Monday, November 17, 2014 @ 12:14 AM
Updated: Wednesday, December 17, 2014 @ 6:24 PM


            Police chief says officer who shot man on Huffman Avenue justified
Police chief says officer who shot man on Huffman Avenue justified

UPDATE @2:45 p.m. (Dec. 17): A Montgomery County grand jury has declined to indict Dayton police Officer Raymond Dine in a deadly officer-involved shooting in November.

UPDATE @ 5 p.m. (Nov. 17): Officer Raymond Dine was justified in shooting John R. Smelko, Dayton Police Chief Richard Biehl said during a news conference. He said Smelko would be alive had he followed the officers’ instruction when they responded to a call at the man’s home.

“Putting that firearm through that opening in the door — he had to lift it up and put it through the top of that door — that’s clearly an intentional act, and it is a clear obvious imminent threat of serious physical harm or death,” the chief said.

UPDATE @ 11:14 a.m.: The names of a Dayton police officer and the man he shot and killed late Sunday night have been released.

Officer Raymond Dine reportedly shot John R. Smelko at a home at 1101 Huffman Ave., officials said.

Smelko had no felony record in Montgomery County Common Pleas Court, but did have misdemeanor assault charges in Dayton Municipal Court in 2005 and 2013, all of which were withdrawn, according to court records.

Smelko’s autopsy is being performed today.

FIRST REPORT

A 40-year-old Dayton man is dead in a police-involved shooting in East Dayton late Sunday.

Two Dayton police officers were responding to a disconnected 911 call at 1101 Huffman Ave. prior to the shooting, according to Dayton Police Chief Richard Biehl.

The officers knocked on the home’s front door, which was opened “a crack,” and the officers saw a hand with a gun pointed at them. One police officer fired one shot, hitting a 40-year-old white, male inside the home, Biehl said.

“Officers repeatedly gave the individual orders to show his hands,” Biehl said. “At some point, the male suspect produced a firearm, pointed at the police officer and the police officer fired a shot, fatally killing the suspect.”

Police expect to release more information later today.

The shooting occurred around 11:50 p.m. Sunday.

Initial reports are that a man was shot in the chest.

Police have not released the name of the shooting victim or the officers involved. The officer who fired the shot has been placed on paid administrative leave pending the outcome of an investigation into the use of force, Biehl said.

The street was blocked by police tape while several crews investigated.

This is the second fatal police-involved shooting in a week in the area.

On Thursday, officers in Montgomery County’s Butler Twp. were involved in a shooting that killed Andrew Brady Davidson, 33, of Arcanum.

Davidson’s car was stopped by Butler Twp. officers in the parking lot of a restaurant on Miller Lane. Davidson threatened to kill officers and got out of his car and moved toward two officers holding a knife, according to a statement by the police department. The two officers, Sgt. Todd Stanley and Officer Amy Carter, fired four shots, killing Davidson.

Two Darke Co. men wake up to arrests on felony charges

Published: Monday, October 16, 2017 @ 6:40 PM

(Jacob Evans, 23)(Randolph County Jail)
(Jacob Evans, 23)(Randolph County Jail)
(Dustin Sonner, 26) (Randolph County Jail)

Union City Police responded to the 500 block of S. Stateline Road Friday morning on call of a suspicious vehicle with two passed out subjects. 

According to police reports, three officers responded to the scene and found the two subjects, shouting several times in an attempt to wake them up. Officers finally made contact with the man in the driver’s seat, identified as Jacob Evans, 23, of Arcanum. The passenger was later identified as Dustin Sonner, 26, of Greenville. 

While speaking, the officers noticed a syringe lying in plain view inside the vehicle. A search revealed the vehicle contained 7 grams of crystal meth valued at about $700, and a small amount of heroin, as well as drug paraphernalia and scales. 

Both subjects were taken to Randolph County jail on charges of: dealing in methamphetamine, a level 3 felony, possession of methamphetamine, a level 5 felony, possession of heroin, a level 6 felony, and possession of a syringe, a level 6 felony. 

Reward offered in search for man suspected of raping, killing baby

Published: Tuesday, October 17, 2017 @ 2:20 AM

Joshua Gurto
Conneaut Police Department
Joshua Gurto(Conneaut Police Department)

Police in eastern Ohio are looking for a man suspected of raping and killing a baby girl.

According to WFMJ, the Northern Ohio Violent Fugitive Task Force is offering a reward of up to $5,000 for information that leads to the arrest of Joshua Gurto.

>> Read more trending news

Gurto is accused of raping and killing a 13-month-old girl in Ashtabula County. He is wanted by the U.S. Marshals Service and the Conneaut Police Department on aggravated murder and rape charges, WFMJ reported.

Police said he has ties to western Pennsylvania.

Gurto is described as:

  • 37 years old
  • 5 feet, 10 inches tall
  • 145 pounds
  • Deformed right year
  • Misaligned jaw
  • Tattoos on right forearm

Anyone with information on Gurto’s whereabouts is asked to call the Northern Ohio Violent Fugitive Task Force at 866-4WANTED or text keyword WANTED and the information to 84711.

Tipsters can remain anonymous.

Related

Warrant alleges mother put 2 toddlers in oven, turned it on

Published: Monday, October 16, 2017 @ 6:52 PM

Lamora Williams, 24, is charged with two counts of murder and is accused of placing two of her children into an oven and turning it on, according to an arrest warrant.
Fulton County Sheriff’s Office
Lamora Williams, 24, is charged with two counts of murder and is accused of placing two of her children into an oven and turning it on, according to an arrest warrant.(Fulton County Sheriff’s Office)

A 24-year-old mother of four is accused of killing her two youngest sons “by placing them in an oven and turning it on,” according to an arrest warrant obtained Monday by The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

An official autopsy is pending.

Fulton County jail officials said Lamora Williams waived her first appearance in court Monday on felony murder charges.

>> Read more trending news

The arrest warrant alleges Williams put her sons in the oven sometime between midnight Thursday and 11 p.m. Friday.

Williams called her sons’ father, Jameel Penn, on Friday night and showed him by video chat that something was wrong in her Atlanta apartment home.

Penn said he immediately called the police.

2 Children Found Dead in Apartment; Mother Charged

When officials arrived at the Oakland City West End Apartment complex, the boys, 2-year-old Ke’Younte Penn and 1-year-old Ja’Karter Williams, were dead.

Related: 2 children found dead in Atlanta apartment; mother charged

Friends and family members of Williams told the AJC she suffered from undiagnosed mental health problems that were exacerbated by her father’s death when she was 19 and by having four children younger than 7. They said she was also a single mother who had some help from Penn, but not enough considering her mental health.

Williams’ longtime friend Neesa Smith said Williams quit a job about a month ago because she couldn’t find a babysitter for the kids. 

“Nobody could tell what she was going through,” Smith said.

Williams’ sister, Tabitha Hollingsworth, said Williams is at risk and should be put on suicide watch in the Fulton County Jail, where she remains without bond.

Want to avoid getting hacked while driving? Check this out

Published: Sunday, October 15, 2017 @ 8:00 AM
Updated: Monday, October 16, 2017 @ 5:56 PM

David Barzilai, Karamba Security, co-founder & executive chairman
David Barzilai, Karamba Security, co-founder & executive chairman

Computers control an increasing number of vehicle functions now, and will do so even more in the future when autonomous — or self-driving — cars and trucks become more common. Given that technology in the vehicles we drive is ever increasing, how safe are we from cyber intruders? 

RELATED: The newest frontier for hackers: your car

David Barzilai, Chairman and co-founder of Karamba Security

“We’ve enabled hackers to gain access to the car by a small set of controllers. Once one of them is compromised then hackers can gain control of that controller and then manipulate the other controllers (and) start sending commands to the car. In essence we as drivers are now losing control. Because (hackers can cause the) car to stop on the highway, airbags may disengage, the steering wheel could start go to one direction or another without us having any control of it.”

RELATED: ‘Smart car’ technology may make roads safer, but some fear data hacks

Vance Saunders, director of the cybersecurity program at Wright State University

“The world has changed. Everything is so interconnected and with that comes the potential for bad things to happen. So therefore there is a responsibility for all auto manufacturers – it doesn’t mean just cars – people who make anything. It’s going to get connected to the internet and they have responsibility to address security because the environment that their products were being used in has changed.”

RELATED: Would you ride in a car with a brain?

Carla Bailo, assistant vice president for mobility research and business development at Ohio State University

“(Safeguards are needed) to protect the data. To ensure that these products are not hacked. That the bad guys won’t try do something either to the vehicle or infrastructure. Because either way it can create dire consequences.”

Carla Bailo Assistant Vice President Mobility Research and Business Development at Ohio State University(HANDOUT/Handout)

RELATED: Experts say self-driving cars will save lives: Would you ride in one?

Seth Hamman, assistant professor of computer science Cedarville University

“It will be a long time before they exhaust all of their attack vectors….There’s no shortage of different avenues to try.”

RELATED: Experts say self-driving cars will save lives: Would you ride in one?

C. Emre Koksal, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering at Ohio State University

“One way to cause chaos is to go out there and inject fake messages (into vehicle computers).”