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Fairmont fired 2 connected to Stivers teacher indicted for pandering

Published: Friday, September 29, 2017 @ 12:00 AM


            John S. Findley
John S. Findley

Two Kettering Fairmont High School part-time employees were dismissed in June when the district’s superintendent found out about their connection to the Stivers High School drama teacher who is facing charges of pandering obscenity involving a minor.

Former Dayton Public Schools employee John S. Findley, 34, has been indicted on seven counts of pandering obscenity of a minor or pandering sexually oriented material involving a minor from November 2015 until August 2016.

The Montgomery County Prosecutor’s Office and Findley’s attorney have said the alleged victim was not a Stivers student. Prosecutors said Findley was charged for having pictures of a juvenile that were found on his phone.

RELATED: Former teacher indicted on pandering obscenity of a minor wants evidence suppressed

Findley has a hearing Nov. 1 in Montgomery County Common Pleas Court to challenge the way investigators obtained some evidence, according to Findley’s attorneys.

Prosecutors said Findley is free on a $100,000 bond and is required to have electronic monitoring of his whereabouts.

Findley was placed on paid leave from Dayton Public Schools April 18, according to district records. David Romick, president of the teachers union at Dayton Public Schools, said Findley’s discipline process had not gone far when Findley resigned July 9. Findley was indicted Aug. 29.

RELATED: 3 things to know about John S. Findley

In late June, Fairmont Superintendent Scott Inskeep fired two employees — who are not being named because they haven’t been criminally charged — after speaking to Dayton police about this case, a school district spokesman said this week. The two were employed part-time in non-teaching and non-coaching roles.

“Scott was contacted by a detective who provided him with information about an investigation involving Mr. Findley and made him aware of his associations (with the employees),” Fairmont school district spokeswoman Kari Basson wrote in an email.

“Due to the nature of the investigation, the decision was made to not renew the supplemental contracts of (the men). Supplemental contracts are all non-renewed each school year and these individuals were not offered new supplemental contracts for the 2017-18 school year.”

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Findley never worked for Kettering’s school district, according to Basson. The two fired Kettering employees’ personnel files didn’t include a termination letter.

Kettering police public information officer John Jung said that department has had only brief contact with both men. Prosecutor’s office spokesman Greg Flannagan said the two men do not have current criminal cases against them.

Basson wrote that it was Inskeep’s understanding “that this is an ongoing investigation involving Mr. Findley, so he prefers not to comment any further on anything that might pertain to the investigation.”

MORE: Read other stories from Jeremy P. Kelley

This news organization has asked Dayton Public Schools for public records related to Findley’s alleged communications involving minors.

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The mandatory reporting requirement for employees in any official capacity who suspect possible child abuse or neglect extends to many professionals, including all school district employees.

Dayton police have asked anyone with relevant information to call Sgt. Gary Lowe at (937) 333-1132.

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2nd boy accused of school threats ordered to remain in custody

Published: Tuesday, February 20, 2018 @ 10:17 AM
Updated: Tuesday, February 20, 2018 @ 4:42 PM


            This afternoon, Waren County Juvenile Court Judge Joe Kirby flashed a newspaper headline reporting that more than 400 people had been shot in 200 school shootings since the shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Connecticut before ordering a boy, 17, of Turtlecreek Twp., who has already served four days in detention to remain in the detention center in a school threat case. LAWRENCE BUDD/STAFF
This afternoon, Waren County Juvenile Court Judge Joe Kirby flashed a newspaper headline reporting that more than 400 people had been shot in 200 school shootings since the shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Connecticut before ordering a boy, 17, of Turtlecreek Twp., who has already served four days in detention to remain in the detention center in a school threat case. LAWRENCE BUDD/STAFF

UPDATED @ 4:30 p.m

Warren County Judge Joe Kirby ordered a 14-year-old Hamilton Twp. boy to remain in custody and undergo an assessment following a hearing Tuesday. The boy is accused of inducing panic, making false alarms and intimidation of a witness after a Snapchat of him holding a realistic toy gun to a friend’s head left other students worried he would bring a gun to school at Little Miami High School.

RELATED: ‘Whole world is on edge’ Warren County judge tells teens accused of making school threats

EARLIER:

A Lebanon High School student will remain in the Warren County Detention Center for assessment in a school threat case.

This afternoon, Judge Joe Kirby flashed a newspaper headline reporting that more than 400 people had been shot in 200 school shootings before issuing the order to the boy, 17, of Turtlecreek Twp., who has already served four days in detention since he surrendered to authorities on Friday.

RELATED: Lebanon High School student accused of threatening another student with social media

He is charged with inducing panic by texting, “THAT’S IT IM GONNA SHOOT UP A SCHOOL I CAN’T TAKE IT ANYMORE” to friends on Feb. 15.

RELATED: Lebanon High School student accused of threatening another student with social media

This case stems from an incident reported on Friday night by Lebanon City Schools involving a student threatening a student in another district using social media.

MORE: Ross High student held over alleged social media threat

Another juvenile who attended Little Miami High School is scheduled for a 1:30 p.m. hearing on charges including inducing panic and intimidation of a witness in the court in Lebanon, according to court officials.

MORE: Bomb threats plaguing Warren County schools again

“You could not not pick a worse offense,” Kirby said, noting the text was sent the day after the school shooting sin Parkland, Fla.

MORE: 13 Things to Know About Parkland high school’s namesake

He is to return to court on Feb. 28 at 3 p.m.

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You could lose your tax refund with this latest IRS scam

Published: Tuesday, February 20, 2018 @ 12:19 PM

You could lose your tax refund with this latest IRS scam

A sneaky new scam involving tax refunds is growing, and it means you need to keep a close eye on your bank account.

There are several variations of the scam: unexpected refund deposits to your bank account using compromised bank routing information, suspicious paper checks coming in the mail and, in one case reported in Maryland, it appeared a fraudulent refund check had been deposited using a smartphone. 

Bon-Ton going-out-of-business sales start at stores this week

According to the IRS, the victim will then receive a call or recorded message saying they need to return the funds to a collection agency-which is actually the scam account. 

If you pay the scammers, you will get a double whammy hit to your bank account when the IRS or your bank realize that the deposit was bogus and withdraws the funds.

The number of victims jumped from a few hundred to a few thousand in just days, after more tax practitioner data breaches, according to the IRS.

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The IRS has these recommendations to avoid getting scammed:

If you notice a suspicious deposit, contact your bank to have the money returned to the IRS and call the IRS at 800-829-1040. 

If you receive a paper check, write “void” in the endorsement field on the back and return it to the location printed on the check. 

If you mistakenly cashed the erroneous refund check, submit a check for the full amount to the IRS location near you. 
  • ANDOVER – Internal Revenue Service, 310 Lowell Street, Andover MA 01810
  • ATLANTA – Internal Revenue Service, 4800 Buford Highway, Chamblee GA 30341
  • AUSTIN – Internal Revenue Service, 3651 South Interregional Highway 35, Austin TX 78741
  • BRKHAVN – Internal Revenue Service, 5000 Corporate Ct., Holtsville NY 11742
  • CNCNATI – Internal Revenue Service, 201 West Rivercenter Blvd., Covington KY 41011
  • FRESNO – Internal Revenue Service, 5045 East Butler Avenue, Fresno CA 93727
  • KANS CY – Internal Revenue Service, 333 W. Pershing Road, Kansas City MO 64108-4302
  • MEMPHIS – Internal Revenue Service, 5333 Getwell Road, Memphis TN 38118
  • OGDEN – Internal Revenue Service, 1973 Rulon White Blvd., Ogden UT 84201
  • PHILA – Internal Revenue Service, 2970 Market St., Philadelphia PA 19104

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Hamilton to decide this year whether cops wear body cams. Here’s what that means for the city.

Published: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 @ 5:00 AM


            West Chester Twp. Patrol Officer Mark York is wearing one of the 50 newly purchased police body worn cameras. DENISE G. CALLAHAN/STAFF
            DENISE G. CALLAHAN
West Chester Twp. Patrol Officer Mark York is wearing one of the 50 newly purchased police body worn cameras. DENISE G. CALLAHAN/STAFF(DENISE G. CALLAHAN)

This will be the year, predicts Police Chief Craig Bucheit, that Hamilton decides whether to equip its police officers with body cameras that record the actions of the law enforcement officers and those they are arresting.

The city recently performed a test and evaluation of its fourth body-cam vendor.

“I would expect that we’re going to get to a decision point this year, in 2018,” Bucheit said.

MORE: Fairfield outfits police officers with body cameras

Hamilton is taking its time because the decision is one that can lock a government into a relationship with a vendor for many years, partly because the companies are responsible for storing the video for long periods of time.

“It really is a huge decision in terms of taxpayer dollars, resources and the allocation of that,” Bucheit said. “So it’s a decision we want to make sure we’re getting right. There’s still a lot of uncertainty around the technology, in terms of best practices and how the hardware, the cameras themselves, are utilized – when you’re recording, when you’re not, how to store that, how do you manage that.

“What are the costs on the back end? Not just the up-front costs in terms of the hardware, but what are the costs on the back end to store, to maintain that (for years to come).”

Across the county, West Chester Township and Oxford are the latest agencies to begin using such cameras.

RELATED: Police body cams: As Butler County departments add them, debate continues

When using body cameras, “You’re creating potentially hundreds of thousands of hours of records that have to be maintained,” Bucheit said. “So what does that look like? How many people (on staff) does that take? What are the personnel expenses that are associated with that storage?”

Also, he said, there are decisions to make about what videos should be released to the public, the media, and others.

Some early studies found the cameras led to fewer complaints against police and fewer instances of police misconduct, but Bucheit said, “there are studies out there that show that net benefit is a much smaller margin than was initially reported.”

RELATED: West Chester Twp. trustees approve police body cameras

Before implementing a program, if one is put in place, there will be public meetings “to explain this equipment, to explain these issues,” Bucheit said. “What do they have a right to expect?”Also, what kinds of images can they expect to be released after incidents from the videos?

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Two men shot to death on North Dixie Drive were friends

Published: Tuesday, February 20, 2018 @ 5:12 PM


            The gate is closed and locked Tuesday at Buck-I Auto Sales on North Dixie Drive in Harrison Twp. Authorities said owner Frank D. Buck, 71, and Lester Golson, 59, were found shot to death inside on Monday. MIKE CAMPBELL/Staff
The gate is closed and locked Tuesday at Buck-I Auto Sales on North Dixie Drive in Harrison Twp. Authorities said owner Frank D. Buck, 71, and Lester Golson, 59, were found shot to death inside on Monday. MIKE CAMPBELL/Staff

The names of the two men found shot to death Monday in a Harrison Twp. car dealership have been released, but their autopsies are still pending.

LISTEN: The 911 call about the North Dixie shooting

The men, reportedly friends, were officially identified Tuesday as Buck-I Auto Sales owner Frank D. Buck, 71, and Lester Golson, 59, according to the Montgomery County Coroner’s Office.

Deputies said they do not believe anyone else was involved in the shooting deaths, but declined to provide many additional details.

Buck’s daughter, who said Tuesday that funeral services are pending, expressed love for her father and compassion for the Golson family.

“My father was a loving man would do anything in the world for just about anybody, he was loved by a lot he was always smiling, laughing, and joking around,” said Candace Buck. “My condolences are with the Golson family during this very hard time.”

FIRST REPORT: 2 men found shot to death inside auto dealership

Candace Buck said Golson was a family friend who had purchased vehicles at the business before.

A woman who tried to get into the business Monday and saw one man point a gun at another then called 911 to report that she saw people get into a “tussle” before she heard three gunshots.

BREAKING NEWS: Police investigating after bones found behind Dayton home

In the sometimes frantic 6-minute call at 1:22 p.m., the woman said, “I was trying to get to my car and get to the phone to call the police then I heard gunshots.”

The Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office incident report listed the call as a homicide with an investigation pending. Other than that, it gave few clues as to detective’s theories.

The report’s narrative read: “On Monday, February 1, 2018, Deputies from the Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office were dispatched to 2801 North Dixie Drive in Harrison Township in reference to a shooting.”

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Deputies had not commented on the relationship between Buck and Golson. Neither had felony records in Montgomery County Common Pleas Court.

Kyle Phillips of Huber Heights watched Monday as police worked the scene. He said he shopped for a car at the dealership several years ago.

Phillips said word of two deaths was “crazy” but that gunfire in the Northridge area — where he used to live — was not surprising to him.

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The sheriff’s office said people in the North Dixie area shouldn’t worry about suspects.

“I don’t believe that there’s anybody that we need to worry about right now,” Capt. Jeremy Roy said. “We think it was contained right here.”

Police have not released how many weapons were found at the scene or if the bullets found in the deceased’s bodies match the weapon or weapons found.

Sheriff’s Office Chief Deputy Rob Streck said Tuesday there was no new information available and that detectives are chasing down leads.

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