Daniel Schooler indicted in Dayton pastor shooting case

Published: Sunday, February 28, 2016 @ 12:39 PM
Updated: Wednesday, March 09, 2016 @ 10:48 AM


            Pastor's brother officially charged in shooting death

The pastor of St. Peter’s Missionary Baptist Church was shot and killed at the end of Sunday services, and his brother is behind bars, accused of pulling the trigger. Lines wrapped around the church where the pastor’s funeral was held Thursday. The suspect has pleaded not guilty to the charges against him.

Key Points:

  • Shooting happened inside the church
  • Victim identified as William Schooler, 70, of Dayton
  • Suspect is his brother, Daniel Schooler, 68, of Dayton
  • Daniel Schooler arrested at the church, faces murder charges
  • Suspect has history of mental illness and violence, according to court, police records

 

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UPDATE @ 10:45 a.m. (March 9):

Daniel Schooler was indicted on seven charges today by a grand jury.

Schooler was indicted for aggravated murder, two counts of murder, two counts of felonious assault and two counts of having weapons while under disability, according to court records.

He is scheduled to be arraigned in common pleas court on March 10 at 8:30 a.m.

UPDATE @ 9:36 a.m. (March 9):

A Montgomery County grand jury is scheduled to hear the case involving the shooting death of a Dayton pastor, according to a court clerk.

Daniel Schooler, 68, is charged with two counts of murder, one count of aggravated murder, two counts of felonious assault and two counts of having weapons under disability

UPDATE @ 2:01 p.m. (March 3):

A long line of mourners wrapped around the Zion Hill Missionary Baptist Church building on Thursday as people gathered to pay their last respects to a local pastor who was shot and killed inside his church.

Rev. William B. Schooler, 70, was shot multiple times inside St. Peter’s Missionary Church on Sunday. His brother Daniel G. Schooler, 68, is facing multiple charges in connection with the pastor’s murder.

On Thursday, Gale McLemore said she knew a large amount of people would attend the service for Schooler. The pastor’s reach went beyond the pulpit and extended into the community, she said.

“It’s very difficult and there’s really no words to express what’s in our hearts today,” she said. “I think he meant a lot to the people in the city. The lives he touched. The children’s lives he touched as an educator. The efforts he put into the community.”

William Schooler was known as a leader within the Dayton community. After graduating from Dunbar High School in 1963, he went on to become a decorated Vietnam Veteran who received the Bronze Star.

William Schooler taught in the Dayton Public Schools district from 1972 until 1978 before becoming a principal in the Jefferson Twp. from 1978 until 1997, when he retired. He was also a was also a former Dayton Board of Education member.

William Schooler had integrity, said Derrick Atterberry, a Dayton resident who came to the funeral to pay his respects.

“He was about people,” Atterberry said. “He showed love, and I think this is their way of showing love back to him.”

UPDATE @ 10:54 a.m. (March 3):

A line formed outside of Zion Hill Missionary Baptist Church on West Third Street prior to Rev. William Schooler’s funeral service Thursday morning. People visiting the church for the funeral services said the church is full.

UPDATE @ 2:05 p.m. (March 2):

Daniel Schooler was arraigned on two counts of murder, one count of aggravated murder, two counts of felonious assault and two counts of having weapons under disability in Dayton Municipal Court this afternoon.

Schooler pleaded not guilty to the charges and he is continuing to be held in the Montgomery County Jail with a $1 million bond.

Preliminary hearing is set for March 9.

UPDATE @ 11:17 a.m. (March 2):

Daniel Schooler shot his brother four times with a stolen .380 caliber handgun, the final shot being witnessed by William Schooler’s wife, according to court documents filed by Dayton police.

“The defendant then laid the gun down and waited for police who took him into custody,” said the affidavit written by a Dayton police detective.

The affidavit said Daniel Schooler confronted his brother at 12:22 p.m. Feb. 28 “and with prior calculation and design, carried out previous threats to kill the victim,” detective Nathan Via wrote. The document also noted that the defendant had two prior convictions for felonious assault, is under a weapons disability and is a repeat violent offender.

Daniel Schooler is scheduled to be arraigned today in Dayton Municipal Court on several counts including murder.

UPDATE @ 3:28 p.m. (March 1):

Funeral services for the Rev. William B. Schooler have been scheduled for 11 a.m. Thursday at Zion Hill Missionary Baptist Church, 1900 W. Third St., Dayton.

UPDATE @ 1:18 p.m.:

Daniel Schooler, 68, has been charged with three counts of murder, two counts of felonious assault and two counts of using weapons under disability, according to a Dayton Municipal Court clerk.

The charges were filed around 1 p.m. Tuesday.

The clerk said while the charges were filed, Schooler is not expected to appear in court on Tuesday.

Prosecutor’s said the case will be presented to a grand jury at a future date.

“This is a tragic and senseless shooting. We extend our condolences to not only the family of the victim, but also to the congregation of St. Peter’s Missionary Baptist Church,” said Montgomery County Prosecutor Mat Heck Jr..

INTIAL REPORT:

The Rev. William Schooler, 70, was gunned down just before 12:30 p.m. in his office in back of his church while the choir was singing at the end of Sunday services.

The congregation heard the shots that claimed their beloved pastor, community leader and former Dayton Board of Education member in their Nancy Avenue church.

“I just got everybody out of the church and we just kept hearing shooting and shooting,” said Alberta Blayth of Dayton. The church member said she saw the accused shooter, the pastor’s 68-year-old brother Daniel Schooler, head for the office while the pastor’s wife and the pastor were inside.

A church member called 911 when the shooting began: “Our pastor just got shot by his brother! … He’s still shooting him!” Dispatch: “Where is the shooter at?” Caller: “In the church. In the back, with his brother and his wife.”

Before the shooting, the service was turned over to Curtis Booker, the choir director, who said he saw Daniel Schooler get up and follow his brother to the back.

“Then I heard the first pop and I thought he fell because there’s a little step right there. Then I heard a second pop. And I was like, that sounds like gunshots,” Booker said.

“We heard pow, pow,” church member Beulah Booker-Robertson said, recounting the shooting. “The usher at the door said ‘everybody get down, everybody get out.’ ”

Dayton police said Schooler was shot multiple times, but that the congregation and community at large were not targeted and there were no other intended victims.

“I want to make sure the public understands this is not a random act of violence,” Sgt. Creigee Coleman said. “This was somewhat of a domestic situation between family members.”

Daniel Schooler was taken into custody at the church. He was led in handcuffs to a waiting police cruiser and is now behind bars at the Montgomery County Jail, where he was booked on suspicion of murder. He is scheduled to be arraigned Monday afternoon, online jail records show.

The shooting remains under investigation, and police and prosecutors plan to meet to discuss formal charges.

A Schooler family member said Daniel Schooler struggled with mental illness. “Bipolar, schizophrenic. He had a lot of things going on he was dealing with,” said Joyce Napier, niece of the pastor and suspect. “I don’t think he woke up this morning and said ‘I want to kill my brother.’ I just think the mental state and illness goes together and that’s what evil does.”

The Schooler family is in pain, Napier said, but will grieve together.

“We stick together. And we pray. And don’t turn on each other … because he has daughters, the other one has daughters. And we loved them both, so we have to stick together. That’s all we know, that’s all we have,” she said.

Sidney McDonald’s robbery suspect arrested

Published: Friday, May 26, 2017 @ 3:33 AM

Lance Shewalter

 SIDNEY — A man suspected of robbing the McDonald’s on Michigan Street was taken into custody by police on Thursday. 

Lance C. Shewalter, 32, is being held at the Shelby County Jail.

Sidney police were dispatched to the 2200 block of Michigan Street around 10:43 p.m. Thursday.

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Shortly after, officers located Shewalter in the an area near where police say witnesses lost sight of him. 

Several items used in the robbery were located in the area, according to police. 

Shewalter has been charged with robbery and is being held at the Shelby County Jail. 

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1-month-old boy dies after parents didn't check on him for at least 6 hours, police say

Published: Thursday, May 25, 2017 @ 10:43 PM

Cameron Dowden, 21, (pictured) and Superiah Campbell, 19, were arrested in Florida Thursday after investigators claimed their child died because they allegedly failed to check on him for at least six hours.
WFTV.com

The parents of a 1-month-old Cocoa, Florida, boy were arrested Thursday after investigators claimed their child died because they allegedly failed to check on him for at least six hours.

Superiah Campbell, 19, and Cameron Dowden, 21, were each charged with a count of manslaughter of a child for the May 10th death of their son.

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Cocoa police officers were called to the couple’s apartment unit at about 12:15 p.m. on May 10.

The 911 caller told officials the child had stopped breathing and was cold to the touch, investigators said.

Emergency personnel tried to resuscitate the child when they arrived at the apartment, but he was pronounced dead at the scene.

After investigating the child’s death, police said they found that evidence showed the parents had not checked on the child for at least six hours, leading to the discovery of the boy in an unresponsive state.

“By failing to check on the child for over six hours, the defendants consciously did an act, or followed a course of conduct that they must have known, or reasonably should have known, was likely to cause death or great bodily harm,” Cocoa Police Department Detective Debra Titkanich wrote in an affidavit. “Both parents showed a reckless disregard for human life.”

Investigators had not determined an official cause of death but said it appeared the child suffocated. 

2-car crash forces vehicle into Dayton house; 2nd driver flees

Published: Thursday, May 25, 2017 @ 7:23 PM

A two-car crash this evening forced one car into a house at the corner of Stewart Street and Clement Avenue in Dayton.

A passenger in the car was taken to Miami Valley Hospital with injuries described as minor, according to police.

The second car fled the scene but was found a few blocks away. However, its driver ran from the car before police arrived.

It is not clear whether that driver has been caught and we’re working to learn more information about what led to the crash.

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9th inmate sues Montgomery County Jail, now-fired officer

Published: Thursday, May 25, 2017 @ 1:12 PM
Updated: Thursday, May 25, 2017 @ 6:05 PM

A ninth lawsuit has been filed by a former inmate alleging mistreatment by Montgomery County Jail personnel, this one involving a now-fired corrections officer that the sheriff’s office tried to prosecute.

Former inmate Daryl Wallace, 44, filed a lawsuit this week against former corrections officer Jerrid Campbell, Montgomery County Sheriff Phil Plummer and the county’s board of commissioners in Dayton’s U.S. District Court.

Wallace’s attorneys alleged that Campbell “viciously beat” Wallace with impunity. The Sept. 28, 2015, altercation was captured on surveillance video.

EARLIER: Officer who sheriff tried to charge for jail assault claims unfairness

The civil rights, excessive force lawsuit claimed that Wallace complained to Campbell that his cell’s hot water wasn’t working and Campbell refused to call maintenance.

Wallace called Campbell a name, the lawsuit said, and walked away before Campbell ordered him to stop and shoved Wallace to the ground.

“Campbell then pummeled Mr. Wallace with punch after punch while holding handcuffs and using them like brass knuckles,” Wallace’s attorney’s wrote. “(Wallace) was bleeding from his scalp.”

RELATED: Officers spit on, attacked in jails bursting with mentally ill

Wallace claims he regularly experiences migraine headaches so bad “it feels like his forehead swells, the pain paralyzes him, and he vomits.” The suit also said Wallace’s vision has worsened since the incident.

Plummer said Thursday that Campbell was fired Tuesday for “violations of numerous policies.”

According to sheriff’s office documents, those violations included: using racist slurs against Plummer and other command staff members; failing to allow an inmate access to a dentist; two violations of use of force; an inappropriate Facebook post about a co-worker, making inaccurate and untruthful statements to the Dayton Daily News; making similar statements to the Dayton Weekly News. Campbell was suspended a total of 23 days for those alleged violations.

RELATED: Oversight committee picked to monitor Montgomery County Jail

Campbell wouldn’t comment Thursday about the lawsuit but said he was fired “for exposing the segregation in the jail and for writing a complaint against Phil Plummer plus the rest of his racist command staff for creating a racist atmosphere towards black officer (sic) and threatening (other officers) for speaking out against racism.”

Campbell’s complaints about comments by former Maj. Scott Landis led to Landis’ demotion in October. In November, Campbell was quoted in a story about allegations that female inmates are racially segregated at the jail and an analysis by this newspaper that found black female inmates were disproportionately placed in older, smaller cells.

Chief Deputy Rob Streck said Thursday that Campbell has alleged he was treated unfairly, but “those allegations have been covered numerous times in numerous investigations without any evidence or any type of proof bought forward other than just accusations.”

I-TEAM SPECIAL PROJECT: Justice at the Jailhouse

The sheriff’s office said this week the “expedited” internal review of the segregation allegations they announced in November is still ongoing.

The 156-page internal investigation of the altercation between Campbell and Wallace, obtained by this newspaper, shows the sheriff’s office referred the case to both city and county prosecutors and both declined charges.

“The situation was properly investigated, and the employee was disciplined and held accountable to the fullest extent,” Plummer said, noting that Campbell was suspended without pay for 10 days.

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Wallace’s attorney, Adam Gerhardstein, said the sheriff was right to discipline Campbell, but the department should have done more to prevent the incident in the first place.

“What’s important is looking at what caused excessive force to be used, and there’s enough evidence out there that we believe there’s a pattern and practice within the Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office of using excessive force in that jail,” he said.

Eight other former inmates have filed suits alleging mistreatment in the jail. None has reached trial or been settled.

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Wallace’s suit mentions the pepper-spraying of Amber Swink while in a restraint chair by then Sgt. Judith Sealey, injuries to Joseph Guglielmo allegedly caused by jail personnel and the death of Robert Richardson, who died after suffering a medical emergency while in his cell.

The suit seeks compensatory and punitive damages plus attorneys fees and court costs.

“Corrections officers are supposed to keep the people in their custody safe,”Adam Gerhardstein said in a statement. “There is no justification for Officer Campbell’s vicious assault on Mr. Wallace. Montgomery County has a responsibility to put an end to the use of excessive force by the corrections officers in its jail.”

The same day the Wallace lawsuit was filed, Plummer attended the first meeting of a new committee established to review jail practices and policy in light of the slew of lawsuits — which he blames in part on increased public attention.

“Another thing we need to address is the media and the frenzy they create, and they bring more ambulance chasers to sue us,” Plummer said at that meeting. “This is a vicious cycle.”