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Children getting hooked on porn

Published: Thursday, October 27, 2016 @ 5:30 PM
Updated: Thursday, October 27, 2016 @ 5:30 PM

Clinical Psychotherapist Frances Duncan says the types of porn kids see today is different than it used to be. Some kids "can't unsee" it and can lose sleep over it.

A new public health crisis is emerging--kids as young as five years old becoming addicted to pornography. Psychologists are telling us that virtually every child is vulnerable and the addiction is as powerful as any drug.  

"I'm seeing kids as young as five years old who are being deeply affected by viewing porn," said Clinical Psychotherapist Frances Duncan, who has an office in Dayton.  

Duncan has counseled about a dozen boys and girls ages 5 through 12 showing signs of porn addiction.  

"The children are very distressed. It is causing anxiety, sleep disturbance," said Duncan. "It's a traumatic experience."  

WATCH: Psychotherapist says many children distressed after seeing porn

Statistics show 90% of kids ages 8 to 16 have seen online pornography. There's no research yet on how many are addicted. Duncan says children can easily find pictures of sexual behavior on any electronic device--from smartphones and i-Pads to computer and TV screens that show video games, cartoons, and Netflix. Even if a child doesn't have access to one of these devices, she says they are often exposed to porn by an older relative, neighbor, or classmate.  

Once they've seen erotic images, Duncan said most children cannot get them out of their heads.  

"This stuff not only changes the brain chemistry but the structure in the brain," according to Duncan, "And these are young developing little brains. It is exactly the same addiction as to an opiate."  

The mothers of two of Duncan's young patients worry about the long-term effects of viewing porn so early in life.  

Tips for parents on how to curtail kids from seeing porn

"My baby boy, I feel like his innocence was robbed," said the mother of a 6-year-old boy. She said an older boy showed her son pornographic pictures on an iPod and that he started "acting out, just sexually and aggressively, too much knowledge for his age."  

WATCH: Tips for parents on how to curtail kids from seeing porn

The mother of another child said she noticed "unusual body language" when her son was holding a Wii U console while wearing headphones.  

"So I walked over and picked it up and he was watching porn on the Wii U and I didn't even know you could do that," said the mother of a 7-year-old.  

Tony Bucio and Ali Laux went to counseling for Bucio's pornography addiction.

Tony Bucio knows all too well the hold that pornography can have on a child. He said he first saw it at 8 year's old and porn is still impacting his life as an adult, especially in his relationship with a girlfriend.  

"It's something that's always been a rift between us. She's never, ever been okay with me watching."  

His longtime girlfriend, Ali Laux, confronted him after he denied his addiction for years. She insisted they get counseling.  

"We've been able to talk about this openly, which at first was really difficult," said Laux. "But, I mean, we're the happiest that we've ever been."  

Duncan believes the earlier a child is treated, the better.  

WATCH: Bucio talks about being addicted to porn

"Our generation of little kids right now are guinea pigs for this," says Duncan. "We don't want to see in twenty years the serious damage that it's caused that we could have possibly prevented had we known."  

Duncan advises parents to educate themselves and talk to their children about pornography.  

She is hosting a free presentation at Positive Solutions at 713 West Grand Avenue on November 10th from 6-7pm. It's called "The 'P' Word" and is presented by Cheryl Mahoney from iWise Screen Health Solutions. Find more information at www.iWise.solutions

Silicon Valley fighting Portman’s efforts to end sex trafficking

Published: Tuesday, September 19, 2017 @ 4:12 PM
Updated: Tuesday, September 19, 2017 @ 4:12 PM

Portman For Digital

Sen. Rob Portman’s fight to keep websites from selling children and women online for sex is being met with resistance by Silicon Valley.

Portman, R–Ohio, who along with a small group of senators has waged a years-long battle against Backpage, a classified site infamous for being the leading online market to purchase children for sex, is trying to amend a 1996 law in order to make it harder to sell people for sex online.

The 1996 Communications Decency Act, meant to regulate pornography on the Internet, included a provision that aimed to protect website operators from third parties that might post harmful or illegal material on their site.

Backpage, Portman said, used that 26-word provision in the law to protect themselves from litigation, even as victim after victim tried to sue the site for selling them online. Portman’s bill would change that, allowing sex trafficking victims to sue websites that knowingly allow sex trafficking on their site. His bill would also allow state and local law enforcement to prosecute sites that violate federal sex trafficking laws.

But his effort is being fought by internet companies who fear the law would subject them to unnecessary litigation and would limit their freedom of speech. One organization has been posting online ads on Facebook and Twitter arguing against his bill, and the Internet Association, which represents Google, Facebook and Microsoft, have been among those to oppose the bill.

But at a hearing of the Senate Commerce Committee Tuesday, Portman said his bill is crafted narrowly to protect sites that inadvertently publish illegal or harmful content and aim, instead, at those who are knowingly selling people for sex, as he said Backpage did. The site shut down its “adult” section in January, but still posts “dating” ads online.

He said three-fourths of sexual trafficking victims are exploited online. Many times, he said, predators make their first connection to the victim online. And sex trafficking, he said, is increasing.

He recently visited Youngstown, where he met with a girl whose father began selling her for sex at age nine, bringing her from city to city to sell her at sporting events. She was raped as often as 20 times a day.

The fact that this occurs, Portman said, is “an outrage. It’s a disgrace. And I believe history is going to judge us on how we respond to it.”

But on the other end of the spectrum is Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., who wrote the provision now being targeted in Portman’s bill.

He argues Portman’s bill would stifle free speech as well as the very innovation that has caused the Internet to thrive. While he opposes sex trafficking, “I just believe the legislation being considered…is the wrong answer to an important question. “

Eric Goldman, Professor, Santa Clara University School of Law, said the bill would inadvertently hurt the companies that try to moderate harmful or illegal content on their sites. The bill, he said, “doesn’t limit itself to bad actors; it applies to the entire Internet and force services doing moderation to comprehensively review all content they receive.”

RELATED: What’s really going on with Portman sex trafficking bill?

Supporters of the bill, however, found a powerful voice in Yvonne Ambrose, whose daughter, Desiree Robinson, died late last year at the age of 16.

Desiree, said Yvonne Ambrose, “was the light of my life, my firstborn, my only daughter, my heart, my world. And Desiree made me a better person, because she was a beautiful person. She had the brightest smile that could light up a room.”

Desiree had been smart, kind and loving, but searched for love and acceptance beyond her family and friends. An adult man found her on social media, preyed on her and pressured her to sell herself online. On Dec. 23, 2016, a 32-year-old man named Antonio Rosales looked her up through Backpage. The pimp drove her to meet Rosales. One day later, Rosales beat her, raped her, strangled her, and then slit her throat.

If she had not been sold on Backpage, her mother said, she might still be alive today.

“It could be your child,” she said, in tears, surveying the senators on the dais. “Your niece, your nephew, your cousins, your friend’s children next, if you don’t stop this…if you’re going fix this problem, fix it.”

Beavercreek voters to decide same school tax rejected in May

Published: Tuesday, September 19, 2017 @ 4:17 PM

Beavercreek City Schools is returning to the Nov. 7 ballot with the same proposal that voters narrowly defeated in the spring special election.

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The proposed 6-mill substitute emergency levy would permanently replace an emergency levy that is set to expire in 2018. If passed, the tax would not raise costs to property owners but continue at the current rate of $210 a year for property valued at $100,000, according to the district. 

The tax would generate approximately 13 percent of the district's daily operating revenue, paying for utilities, bus fuel, classroom supplies, technology and personnel.

MORE >>> Beavercreek school levy will return to voters in November after loss 

Substitute levies came into being in Ohio in 2008 and since then 20 public school districts have secured that revenue source with voters' approval. 

Instead of producing a fixed-dollar amount each year like an emergency levy regardless of new construction, a substitute levy's tax rate doesn't change, but the levy's annual revenue can increase as new homes get built and occupied. Under the current tax, property owners' tax bills gradually decrease as new homes get built and occupied.

You can find out more about the proposal by reading the district’s one-sheet graphic, which is posted on the district’s website.

Buildings damaged following large earthquake in Mexico City

Published: Tuesday, September 19, 2017 @ 4:20 PM

7.1 Magnitude Earthquake Hits Central Mexico

A magnitude 7.1 earthquake caused buildings to sway and break apart in Mexico City on the anniversary of the magnitude 8.0 quake that did major damage in 1985.

>> PHOTOS: Major earthquake strikes Mexico City

Pictures fell from walls, objects were shaken off of flat surfaces and computer monitors toppled over.

Below are the latest images from social media of the damage:

>> Read more trending news

Former UD student indicted in series of nude burglaries

Published: Tuesday, September 19, 2017 @ 3:55 PM

Andres Berdut, Montgomery County Jail
Andres Berdut, Montgomery County Jail

Seven months after allegedly breaking into University of Dayton residences with no clothes on, a man has been indicted for burglary and voyeurism.

Andres Berdut, 22, of Puerto Rico, will be arraigned Oct. 3 in Montgomery County Common Pleas Court on four counts each of burglary and voyeurism. 

Berdut, who was a University of Dayton student at the time, was arrested Feb. 16 after three female students reported that a nude man entered their houses in the early hours of Feb. 15.

Prosecutors say Berdut’s DNA has now also linked him to prior burglaries on the UD campus in September 2015 and December 2016.

Berdut was criminally trespassed off the UD campus following the incidents.

REPORT: Dayton police officer dragged by car

The first encounter occurred around 3:15 a.m. on Woodland Avenue, the second at 4 a.m. on Frericks Way and the third at 4:15 a.m. on College Park Avenue, according to an email advisory from the university.