Cedarville, UD have lowest student loan default rates of area schools

Published: Wednesday, January 11, 2017 @ 4:14 PM


            Brent Shock, assistant vice president of enrollment management and director of financial services at Miami University, right, talks about student loan debt collections at the Ohio Attorney General’s student loan advisory group meeting in Columbus in October.
Brent Shock, assistant vice president of enrollment management and director of financial services at Miami University, right, talks about student loan debt collections at the Ohio Attorney General’s student loan advisory group meeting in Columbus in October.

Cedarville University and the University of Dayton students have the lowest student loan default rates of any area college, according to a new database of default rates from the Student Loan Report, a student loan news website.

RELATED: Local college students carry more debt than state average

The database ranks colleges based on their average default rate. Cedarville students fared better than anyone else in the area with an average default rate of 2 percent, the 12th lowest in the state, while UD students came in at 13th with a default rate of 2.15 percent.

Eight of 10 area universities had default rates lower than the state average of 13.61 percent, according to the database. Ohio has the 41st lowest default rate.

RELATED: Experts think college students need improved ‘financial literacy’

Area community colleges had higher default rates than most nearby four-year universities. In some cases, their default rate was more than double or triple the rate of area university students.

The area school with the highest default rate was Central State University.

CSU students ranked 210 in Ohio and had the third highest default rate of any university or college in the state. Around 29.52 percent of CSU students on average defaulted on their loans.

RELATED: Central State chosen for federal experiment on student loan counseling

Below is a complete ranking of area universities and community colleges, according to the report:

Area universities

12. Cedarville University, 2 percent

13. University of Dayton, 2.15 percent

24. Xavier University, 3.14 percent

31. Wittenberg University, 3.95 percent

47. Ohio State, 5 percent

75. University of Cincinnati, 7.63 percent

83. Wright State, 8.27 percent

97. Miami University, 9.3 percent

145. Wilberforce University, 15.02 percent

210. Central State, 29.52 percent

Area community colleges

172. Columbus State Community College, 19.33 percent

176. Edison State Community College, 20.03 percent

177. Cincinnati State Technical and Community College, 20.05 percent

190. Sinclair Community College, 21.78 percent

201. Clark State Community College, 24.02 percent

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  • Republicans face critical week in Congress on health care, Russia, 2018 spending

    Published: Sunday, July 23, 2017 @ 8:06 PM

    GOP leaders in the U.S. Senate seem ready to push ahead with a showdown procedural vote on a bill to overhaul the Obama health law, even without any assurance that they have enough votes to simply start debate, and without a final decision on what changes Senate Republicans might offer to a health care bill narrowly approved by the House in early May.

    While most of the attention this week will be on the machinations involving health care legislation in the Senate, the House will take the first steps on spending bills for next year’s budget, and vote on a revised plan for new sanctions against Russia, as the House gets ready to head home for an extended summer break.

    Here’s the latest from Capitol Hill:

    1. Senate GOP bill on health care still in limbo. GOP leaders are still vowing to press ahead this week on a procedural vote that would begin debate on a House-passed bill to overhaul the Obama health law, but it’s not clear that Republicans have enough votes to take that first step. The absence of Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) – diagnosed last week with brain cancer – is a big deal, since the White House needs every vote possible. Some still wonder if Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) might be convinced to at least vote to start debate – though he has made clear he is against the options that have been floated so far by top Republicans on health care legislation. As for Democrats, they’re still worried about a late rush to victory by the GOP.

    2. Senate Parliamentarian knocks some holes in GOP plan. Because Republicans chose to use the expedited procedure known as budget reconciliation, the Senate rules play a much larger than normal role, and that has resulted in problems for a series of provisions in the bill. On Friday, the Parliamentarian said a dozen pieces of the Senate bill could be subjected to parliamentary points of order, which could only be overridden by a 60 vote super majority, something the GOP does not have. That includes provisions designed to block any federal dollars from going through the Medicaid program to Planned Parenthood. And the bill may have more holes poked in it on Monday, when the Parliamentarian goes over four other provisions.

    3. Trump keeps pressing GOP on health care. While President Trump again pushed GOP Senators over the weekend to act on health care, his call for action doesn’t seem to be making Republicans in the Congress tremble at the thought of being the target of his ire – and for now, the votes aren’t there to get this Senate health care bill over the finish line. As I type this, it’s not even clear what the GOP might be voting on in the Senate as early as this week – if enough Senators decide to begin debate on the Senate floor. It’s a big week for Republican leaders in the Congress on health care – watch to see what the President says in public about the process, as well as GOP holdouts, and what he does behind the scenes to twist some arms of GOP Senators. Don’t count him out just yet.

    4. House to pass Russia sanctions bill. After sitting on the measure for a few weeks, Republicans in the House will approve a plan that steps up sanctions on Iran and Russia – it was approved on a vote of 98-2 in the Senate. The House though, will add provisions dealing with North Korea, and send that back to the Senate for further action. It’s expected to be approved swiftly there. Behind the scenes, the White House has expressed frustration about the sanctions bill, because it would not allow President Trump to unilaterally roll back economic sanctions against Moscow. The vote comes as there has been more talk that the Trump Administration wants to give two compounds back to Russia, which were confiscated by the Obama Administration last December, in the first punishment for election interference in 2016.

    5. House will leave town without passing all 12 funding bills. For weeks, House GOP leaders and rank-in-file lawmakers have told reporters that they were certainly going to have action on all twelve funding bills for the federal government. Reporters tried not to laugh out loud, knowing full well that was not likely. After this week, the House will be gone from Washington until Labor Day, and the plan is to jam four of the twelve funding bills into one package, and pass them in what’s known as a ‘minibus’ (the smaller version of the omnibus). Funding bills for the military, VA, energy and water programs, and the Legislative Branch (Congress) will be in that plan – but eight other bills will not voted on this week. And yet, the House will go home for five weeks. As you can see, a lot of budget work has not been done in both the House and Senate. Unfortunately, that has become standard procedure no matter which party is in charge.

    6. One odd provision in the minibus. One interesting choice made by Republicans this week is that the House will vote on money to build the border wall backed by President Trump – but not the underlying bill that funds the Department of Homeland Security. A provision for $1.6 billion to start work on the wall along the border with Mexico is part of the “Make America Secure” minibus appropriations bill – but the plan to actually fund Homeland Security operations won’t be voted on by the House – until after Labor Day. You can see the House schedule – a rare five day legislative work week is scheduled this week for the House, and then lawmakers head back home for five weeks.

    7. Democrats look to force votes on Trump hotels. It wouldn’t be a debate on spending bills without some nettlesome votes being forced by the minority. This week, Democrats have asked for amendments that would prohibit government workers from staying at hotels owned or operated by President Trump’s family. One amendment gives the Defense Secretary the right to waive that on national security grounds; another amendment from Rep. Don Beyer (R-VA) gives a list of 40 different Trump hotels that would be off limits for federal government official business. Just one of the votes to look forward to this week in the ‘minibus.’

    8. Not on the schedule – the GOP budget blueprint. While the House Budget Committee last week was finally able to approve a budget outline for 2018, that budget resolution won’t be on the House floor this week. Why? Because it doesn’t have the votes to pass at this point in time. That means any talk you hear from GOP leaders and/or President Trump about action on tax reform needs to be taken with a grain of salt, because that budget blueprint has to be approved by both the House and Senate before any votes on can take place on a tax bill – and since the House isn’t going to be back until after Labor Day, that means tax reform remains on hold in the Congress.

    9. Tax reform must be ‘budget neutral.’ One story that didn’t get much play last week because of the GOP troubles on health care is a wonky type of detail from the GOP budget resolution – but it has a big impact on tax reform plans for Republicans. At issue is a provision that says any tax bill must be budget neutral; in other words, if you cut taxes – and therefore raise the deficit by cutting revenue – then you must offset that lost revenue. That most likely would mean getting rid of tax deductions and tax breaks, a plan that sounds great in theory, but is difficult in practice to get through the Congress. Eliminate or cut back on the mortgage interest deduction? Make health care benefits through your job into taxable income? Get rid of the business interest deduction? Lots of difficult choices. If you think health care is hard, tax reform will be even more difficult.

    10. Infrastructure – the missing Trump agenda item. Along with tax reform, there has been talk for months by the President, top Administration officials, and GOP lawmakers in Congress about voting for a bill to spur the construction of new roads and bridges. Mr. Trump has talked repeatedly about a $1 trillion public-private plan, but no proposal has been sent to the Congress, and none is expected until after Labor Day. Some thought the President should have started with this idea, since increased infrastructure spending is something that Democrats favor – but for a number of Republicans, that wasn’t a good idea, as they repeatedly opposed plans from the Obama Administration for more highway dollars. For now, this is going nowhere fast.

    Bush’s recalls beans over defective cans

    Published: Sunday, July 23, 2017 @ 7:44 PM

    Bush Brothers and Company is recalling certain varieties of beans because of defective cans. (Bush Brothers and Company)
    Bush Brothers and Company is recalling certain varieties of beans because of defective cans. (Bush Brothers and Company)

    Bush Brothers and Company is voluntarily recalling certain varieties of beans because of defective cans that can leak or allow harmful bacteria to grow.

    >> Read more trending news

    Bush’s Brown Sugar Hickory Baked Beans, Country Style Baked Beans and Original Baked Beans in 28-ounce cans were recalled after an internal quality control check uncovered the issue.

    “We urge you to dispose of these affected products immediately even if the beans do not look or smell spoiled,” the company said in a news release.

    There have been no reports of illness or adverse reactions.

    Ohio set to resume executions this week, child killer awaits appeals

    Published: Sunday, July 23, 2017 @ 3:46 PM
    Updated: Sunday, July 23, 2017 @ 3:47 PM

    Ronald Phillips
Ohio Department of Rehabilitation & Correction
    Ronald Phillips(Ohio Department of Rehabilitation & Correction)

    Ohio is moving toward carrying out its first execution in more than three years.

    The last time that happened was January 2014 when a condemned inmate repeatedly gasped and snorted during a 26-minute procedure with a never-before-tried drug combo.

    Executions have been on hold since because the state had trouble finding new supplies of drugs, and death row inmates challenged Ohio’s plans for a new three-drug execution method.

    A look at the case of death row inmate Ronald Phillips who is awaiting decisions on his final appeals ahead of his scheduled execution Wednesday:

    BRUTAL KILLING

    Phillips stayed behind at his girlfriend’s Akron apartment with her two young daughters while she took her son to the doctor in January 1993. When she got back, her 3-year-old was motionless on a bed. The toddler, Sheila Marie Evans, died hours later at a hospital.

    RELATED: Gov. Kasich delays 9 executions in Ohio

    The little girl had bruises all over her body, an autopsy found, and had been beaten on the head, face, lower torso, arms, legs and genitalia.

    Phillips, then 19, first denied hurting the girl but then told a police detective he threw the girl against a wall and beat her after she didn’t come to breakfast, a parole board document said. He also admitted to raping the girl that morning and two previous times, the document said.

    He was convicted and sentenced to death later that year.

    ___

    ORGAN DONATION

    Phillips has had several delays to scheduled executions, most notably in 2013 when he made a last-minute plea to donate his organs.

    He wanted to give a kidney to his mother, who was on dialysis, and possibly his heart to his sister. His request was denied and his mother has since died.

    ___

    WORST OF WORST

    Phillips went up before the Ohio Parole Board in 2013 to ask for clemency but they rejected him, calling the killing “among the worst of the worst.”

    RELATED: Ohio man kills himself on death row

    “Words cannot convey the barbarity of the crime. It is simply unconscionable,” the board said.

    They also noted that in his first interviews with police that Phillips tried to shift blame onto the girl’s mother.

    The parole board last year voted against mercy again, rejecting arguments that Phillips had a terrible childhood and that there were legal mistakes at his trial.

    ___

    FINAL APPEALS

    Phillips still has two appeals pending.

    Last week, he asked the U.S. Supreme Court for an emergency stay based on his age at the time of the killing. He was 19 — older than the Supreme Court’s cutoff of 18 for purposes of barring executions of juveniles — and argues the cutoff age should be 21.

    He also wants a delay based on an execution method he and other inmates have challenged. Phillips’ attorneys say they need time to appeal a lower court decision allowing Ohio to use the new method.

    Apple supplier Foxconn to announce in August if Ohio among three states to get operations

    Published: Saturday, July 22, 2017 @ 4:17 PM

    Ohio is among seven states competing to land factories from Apple iPhone supplier Foxconn, a Taiwanese touchscreen maker.

    The company will announce locations of new U.S. operations in early August, according to the Associated Press, which would be built in three states.

    Ohio has made no mention of negotiations with Foxconn, but Governor John Kasich made a hastily planned trip to Japan in June to discuss an undisclosed business venture, the same weekend governors from Pennsylvania and Wisconsin - two other states Foxconn is considering - were also present.

    Latest on Foxconn: States battle with thousands of jobs on the line

    Texas, Illinois, Indiana and Michigan are also being considered. Foxconn began examining operations in the United States in 2014 because of shipping costs, but has stressed the need for financial incentives to make U.S. factories work. The company’s purchase of Japanese company Sharp has also played a factor. Gou said in January that Pennsylvania appeared to be a leader in luring the manufacturer

    In an article from Bloomberg, Gou said the company was focused on building factories in the U.S. heartland.

    “Our investment in the U.S. will focus on these states because they are the heart of the country’s manufacturing sector,” Gou told investors, according to Bloomberg. “We are bringing the entire industrial chain back to the traditional manufacturing region of the U.S. That may include display making, semiconductor packaging and cloud-related technologies.”

    The investment has been estimated to be near $7 billion. Gou said there is potential for tens of thousands of new jobs.

    Wisconsin is viewed as a  favorite because of its governor, Scott Walker, and his close relationship with President Donald Trump. House Speaker Paul Ryan is also from Wisconsin and the state has made a major play for the company and been one of the few to publicly acknowledge incentives it would give if Foxconn were to open there for business.

    Michigan recently passed a bill rewarding companies that relocate with 3,000 or more jobs and pay a wage average for the area. 

    No details of Ohio’s package have been made available, but the AP listed positives for each state, writing Ohio has a strengthening business economy, as well as recent cuts to corporate taxes and regulation streamlining. Ohio also has an extensive network of universities for training high-skilled workers.

    Kasich was also involved in helping Chinese autoglass manufacturer Fuyao to locate its U.S. plant at the site of the former General Motors truck plant. Ohio's location is also a major positive being close to the U.S. population center, given logistics, shipping costs; a trait shared by other competing states Indiana and Illinois.