Son’s statements may help police understand Hamilton County homicide 

Published: Tuesday, July 04, 2017 @ 1:40 AM
Updated: Wednesday, July 05, 2017 @ 10:56 PM

State trooper shoots homicide suspect in Vandalia

UPDATE @ 10:14 p.m. (July 5):  A 10-year-old boy might be a key to helping police understand what happened when Dana Dubose stabbed his wife to death in her Hamilton County home and was shot to death by a state trooper in Vandalia a few hours later. 

>> Read the latest local stories in the Miami Valley 

According to Springfield Twp. police, the child -- who was the son of 32-year-old Princess Brown -- ran to Vanisha Johnson's home in the aftermath of Monday night's slaying. 

A search of Hamilton County court records shows Dubose and Brown married Aug. 25, 2016. 

"It's just sad that that even happened to her," Johnson told News Center 7's John Bedell of Brown. "Like she didn't deserve that at all." 

According to police, a neighbor called 9-1-1, which brought police to Brown's home after what the boy said: "Mom and them is fighting!" 

(Courtesy/Vanisha Johnson)

The Ohio Highway Patrol is declining to release the name of the trooper who fired the shots that killed Dubose, 36, early Tuesday in the parking lot of a McDonald's in Vandalia. 

The trooper remains on paid administrative leave, pending the outcome of the investigation and the incident is reviewed by the Montgomery County Prosecutor's Office, according to OHP Lt. Robert Sellers. 

Dubose was on parole for domestic violence and having weapons as a felon in Hamilton County. He was released from prison in February 2016 after serving six-and-a-half months with credit for 519 days in jail, according the Ohio Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation.

He was sentenced to prison in May 2008 for for four years on convictions in Hamilton County for aggravated burglary and violation of a protection order. 

Dubose was initially released in late December 2011 but violated parole and was sent back to prison in July 2013, then released again in March 2014.

UPDATE @ 1:32 p.m. (July 4)

Officers found 32-year-old Princess Brown dead with stab wounds on the floor of a Murat Court home at about 11:58 p.m. Monday, police said in a news release.

UPDATE @ 10:35 a.m. 

A man shot and killed by a state trooper in Vandalia early Tuesday morning was a suspect in a homicide that occurred in Hamilton County late Monday night. 

State troopers identified the man killed as Dana D. Dubose, 36, of Cincinnati. 

Dana D. Dubose, Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction

Around 1 a.m. Tuesday, a state trooper, who was not identified, conducted a traffic stop on U.S. 40 near Ranch View Drive in Vandalia, Lt. Robert Sellers of the Ohio State Highway Patrol said in a media release. While on the traffic stop, another vehicle not related to the traffic stop, a white Chevrolet Cruze, rammed the trooper’s patrol car. 

“The male driver, covered in blood, exited the car and approached the trooper while brandishing a knife,” Sellers said. 

SEARCH OTHER POLICE SHOOTINGS IN THE REGION 

LOCAL NEWS: Police officer uses Taser when personal dispute grows into scuffle

The trooper gave verbal commands to Dubose as he exited the vehicle and began to walk across a parking lot next to the roadway. 

“The man continued to disregard verbal commands and lunged at the trooper with the knife extended,” Sellers said. “The trooper discharged one round from the service weapon striking the man.” 

Dubose was pronounced dead at the scene. 

Troopers said Dubose was a suspect in a homicide that occurred in Springfield Twp., Hamilton County at 11:58 p.m. Monday. 

A 32-year-old woman was found dead inside a home on Murat Court in Springfield Twp., Hamilton County, police said in a release. The identity of the woman was not available, pending notification of family. 

UPDATE @5 a.m. 

Ohio State Highway Patrol has confirmed a male suspect was shot and killed on East National Road early Tuesday.

A OSHP trooper stopped a vehicle that ran a red light, according to Lt. Robert Sellers. During the traffic stop another vehicle, a white Chevrolet Cruze, crashed into the state trooper’s cruiser.

LOCAL NEWS: Crews in hazmat suits recover body in Greenville, death investigation underway

After the crash, the suspect got out of the Cruze with a knife, Sellers said. 

When the suspect refused to drop his weapon, the trooper shot the suspect. 

The trooper will be placed on routine administrative leave. 

The trooper has sustained minor injuries from the crash. 

INITIAL REPORT (July 4)

VANDALIA — A shooting was reported at McDonald’s on East National Road early Tuesday. 

The shooting occurred after a 12:47 a.m. Ohio State Highway Patrol traffic stop.

We are working to bring you more information on this developing story. 

Dayton employee fired for moonlighting gets job back

Published: Friday, October 20, 2017 @ 12:17 PM

Some City of Dayton workers might have to quit 2nd jobs

The city of Dayton must reinstate an employee it fired after the city alleged she worked a second job in conflict with her public employment and violated other personnel policies.

In its disciplinary proceedings, the city found Roberta Beyer failed to obtain permission from management before working a second job it says was incompatible with her position as a recreation facility specialist at the Dayton Convention Center.

Roberta Beyer was fired from her job at the Dayton Convention Center. But she won her job back on appeal. CORNELIUS FROLIK / STAFF(Staff Writer)

Beyer, who was fired in February, also was found by the city of being unprofessional or rude to a client and requiring the city to pay overtime to another worker for a scheduling decision she made, city records said.

RELATED: City of Dayton employees now must report moonlighting

But city policy did not clearly specify when employees were supposed to notify management about their outside employment or what constituted a conflict of interest or prohibited employment, according to the Civil Service Board’s decision ordering Beyer’s discharge be reduced to an unpaid suspension.

Earlier this year, the city updated its policies to require all employees to seek departmental approval before seeking outside employment, and several employees have been notified their second jobs are in conflict with their city responsibilities.

Beyer has worked with the city as a recreation facility specialist at the Dayton Convention Center since 2010. She was first hired by the city in 1997.

RELATED: Dayton employee accused of metal theft wins job back

Beyer’s attorney declined to comment for this article. We have contacted the city of Dayton and will update this story when we receive a response.

In February, the city fired Beyer after ruling she violated three of its personnel policies and procedures.

The city said an investigation found that she did not get permission from management before working for the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees, a union representing technicians, artists and crafts persons in the entertainment industry.

She did work at various locations, including at the Wright State Nutter Center and Schuster Center.

The city said the employment interfered with the performance of her work responsibilities at the convention center.

The city also concluded she scheduled an employee to work four hours of overtime and acted unprofessionally toward a client last November.

Beyer had “extensive” personal problems when she acted unprofessionally and should have taken the day off or should have been told to go home, the civil service board decision states.

But the Civil Service Board ruled against city claims that she was incompetent, inefficient or neglected duty.

The board, however, found Beyer neglected her duty to be fiscally responsible by scheduling the employee to work overtime, but they said the error did not merit her being fired.

The board also ruled that she did not violate the city’s code of ethics or personnel policies related to her outside job.

MORE: Nickel a pill: Mayor Whaley’s prescription painkiller surcharge plan

Since 1992, city code has prohibited employees from engaging in incompatible employment, but it does not define or provide examples of what is prohibited by the charter or interferes with workers’ government job responsibilities, the board said.

The city in 2012 updated its policy to say that employees cannot have other jobs that hurt the quality or quantity of their job responsibilities or hold jobs that conflict with their “duties, obligations and loyalties” to the city.

Employees needed management approval when the supplemental employment was related to their city of Dayton positions, but employees were left to “police themselves,” and Beyer did not believe her other job conflicted with her city employment or required approval by her department’s director, the board said.

“Finally, there was no convincing evidence that appellant’s supplemental employment adversely affected her work for the city of Dayton,” the board’s decision states.

MORE: Popular tax incentives could be history: What it would mean for Dayton

In recent months, the city has issued letters to employees about the revised supplemental employment policy, and employees were required to submit requests to engage in additional work, city spokeswoman Toni Bankston said last month.

The city now has an ethics committee that considers requests for outside employment from city employees, and 11 requests went before the committee, Bankston told this newspaper last month.

Records obtained by this news organization indicate that three members of the Dayton Fire Department in September were told that their outside employment requests conflict with the their city positions.

They were told they would “forfeit their employment with the city” if they chose to engage in that supplemental work.

Greene County man targeted in raid sued federal government twice

Published: Thursday, October 19, 2017 @ 6:24 PM

JOEL MONTGOMERY
JOEL MONTGOMERY

The Greene County man whose house was raided by law enforcement for the second time in two years Thursday morning is a former Wright-Patterson Air Force Base employee who twice sued the federal government, according to court documents.

RELATED: Property owner arrest prompts FBI search warrant in Greene County

Both suits ended with a stipulation of dismissal filed in August 2014, more than a year before a 2015 raid at Joel B. Montgomery’s Spring Valley home. That search revealed more than 170 weapons, some being fully automatic, according to the Greene County Sheriff’s Office. No federal criminal charges show up in publicly-available online federal court records.

RELATED: Dozens of firearms seized in Greene County 

This news organization has attempted to reach the lawyers involved in Montgomery’s lawsuits.

Montgomery, 48, sued the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the United States Air Force, the Air Force’s office of special investigation and some individuals alleging unlawful electronic surveillance of him, according to a complaint filed in 2013 in Dayton’s U.S. District Court.

In that lawsuit, Montgomery said he found a GPS device underneath his vehicle, a camera in the WPAFB office in which he worked and a bug in his home, all from 2006 to 2007. At the time, Montgomery said he had certain security clearance and worked for the National Air and Space Intelligence Center (NASIC) and at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), according to the complaint.

In 2007, Montgomery sued General Dynamics, the U.S. Dept. of Defense, the Air Force and an individual for slanderous material that caused him to lose his job and for his company, M and M Aviation, to lose its Air Force contract dealing with “Tactical and Theater Missile Warning Systems,” according to that complaint.

SOCIAL MEDIA: Follow Mark Gokavi on Twitter or Facebook

Montgomery’s suit said that from 2002 to 2004 he was a program manager in charge of the Electro-Optical Materials Intelligence Group of GDAIS, a Dept. of Defense contractor. The complaint said that because of derogatory information, Montgomery was placed on leave without pay and later terminated.

United passenger dragged from plane reaches settlement with airline

Published: Thursday, April 27, 2017 @ 3:19 PM
Updated: Thursday, April 27, 2017 @ 4:36 PM

VIDEO: Passenger Removed From United Airlines Flight

A Kentucky doctor who made headlines earlier this month when he was dragged off a United Airlines flight in Chicago has settled with the airline, attorneys said Thursday in a news release.

>> Read more trending stories

Dr. David Dao suffered numerous injuries when he was dragged off a flight bound for Kentucky on April 9 after refusing to give up his seat.

The confrontation between Dao, 69, and three Chicago Department of Aviation officers was caught on video by passengers on the flight. The footage quickly spread on social media.

>> Related: United passenger suffered broken nose, teeth while being dragged from plane

Attorneys for Dao declined to share details of the settlement, citing a confidentiality provision in the agreement. Attorney Thomas Demetrio praised Oscar Munoz, CEO of United's parent company, in a statement.

"Mr. Munoz said he was going to do the right thing, and he has," Demetrio said. "In addition, United has taken full responsibility for what happened on Flight 3411, without attempting to blame others, including the city of Chicago. For this acceptance of corporate accountability, United is to be applauded."

Dao was hospitalized for days after the incident on Flight 3411 with injuries that included a severe concussion, a broken nose and an unspecified injury to his sinuses. He lost two front teeth in the scuffle, Demetrio said.

WATCH: Attorneys for United Airlines Passenger Dragged from Plane

"Dr. Dao has become the unintended champion for the adoption of changes which will certainly help improve the lives of literally millions of travelers," Demetrio said.

The settlement was reached on the same day United announced policy changes aimed at preventing a similar situation from happening to other passengers. Among the changes was the announcement that the airline will offer travelers as much as $10,000 to give up their seats on overbooked flights.

>> Related:United unveils 10 policy changes, will pay bumped passengers up to $10,000

Previously, the airline would offer up to $1,350, according to Bloomberg.

A number of other airlines also announced policy changes aimed at offering passengers more incentive to delay flights in cases of overbooking and to ensure that they are not taken off planes after boarding.

United's response in the immediate aftermath of the confrontation was widely criticized. Munoz first defended the airline and described Dao as "belligerent" before publicly apologizing days later and vowing to do better.

The officers who pulled Dao from the United flight were placed on leave after the incident.

>> Related: Police who dragged passenger from United flight stand by use of force

The agency released a report on Monday in which the officer who pulled Dao from his seat, James Long, gave his version of events. Long said Dao was verbally and physically abusive and was flailing his arms before he lost his balance and struck his mouth on an armrest.

The department's roughly 300 officers guard the city's two main airports but are not part of the regular Chicago police force. They receive less training than police officers do and cannot carry guns inside the terminals.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Nickel a pill: Mayor Whaley’s prescription painkiller surcharge plan

Published: Wednesday, October 18, 2017 @ 11:10 AM


            Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley proposed new state surcharges for prescription pain medicine to combat the opioid crisis. STAFF
Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley proposed new state surcharges for prescription pain medicine to combat the opioid crisis. STAFF

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley, a Democratic candidate for Ohio governor, today proposed charging a nickel per dose surcharge for every prescription painkiller pill sold in the state.

State data show that 631 million doses of opioids were distributed in Ohio, and a nickel surcharge would generate $31.5 million per year to increase funding for local police and fire responders, substance abuse stabilization centers and state psychiatric hospitals, Whaley said.

“With those dollars, we will return resources to our communities they so desperately need to fight this epidemic,” she said.

RELATED: City of Dayton sues drug makers for role in overdose epidemic

Ohio would be the first state in the nation to take this action, Whaley said, though Washington and California lawmakers have proposed similar types of legislation that would tax or charge opiate makers to pay for addiction prevention and treatment programs.

Dayton was the first city in Ohio and the fourth nationwide to sue drug companies, distributors and doctors that city officials say were responsible for the crisis.

During her announcement this morning, Whaley pointed to a joint investigation by the Washington Post and 60 Minutes that found that Congress, after a large lobbying effort, weakened federal law enforcement’s ability to go after drug distributors even as opioid-related deaths surged.

A law passed by Congress made it “virtually impossible” for the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration to freeze suspicious narcotic shipments from drug companies, according to the investigation.

Whaley criticized Congress for stripping power from federal law enforcement, remarking that Congress took “the E out of the DEA.”