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Highest-ranking black, female Dayton officer alleges discrimination

Published: Wednesday, September 27, 2017 @ 3:51 PM
Updated: Wednesday, September 27, 2017 @ 4:27 PM
By: Cornelius Frolik, Mark Gokavi - Staff Writer

The highest-ranking black woman in the Dayton police department is suing the city for discriminatory employment practices. It’s the second lawsuit brought by a female officer in the past year.

In a federal lawsuit filed this week, Dayton police Lt. Kimberly Hill claims that the city declined to promote her because of her race, sex and her “desire to make changes to the racist tactics of the city of Dayton,” the lawsuit states.

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Hill’s lawsuit claims the city retaliated against her for trying to make real changes to improve police-community relations when she became commander of the Professional Standards Bureau.

Hill claims her subordinates in the department did not take her authority seriously because she is female.

The lawsuit says Hill was treated poorly for trying to ensure citizens’ complaints against police were responded to properly.

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Hill’s lawsuit is seeking more than $75,000 in damages.

City of Dayton spokeswoman Toni Bankston said, “The city does not make comments regarding personnel matters or ongoing litigation.”

In October 2016, Dayton police Sgt. Tonina Lamanna sued the department for gender discrimination.

RELATED: Dayton police Sgt. sues department for gender discrimination

Dayton’s U.S. District Court records show Lamanna claimed “ongoing ordeals” in the department for several years, including that she was not being hired to jobs for which she said she was the most qualified.

The suit — brought by the same attorney Hill hired — said that Lamanna was asked inappropriate gender-related questions such as “what she would do if she got pregnant” and if she “felt she was strong enough” to handle a canine.

Lamanna’s case is currently scheduled to go to trial in November 2018.