Four taken to hospital after N. Main Street single-vehicle accident

Published: Monday, October 02, 2017 @ 8:05 PM
Updated: Monday, October 02, 2017 @ 9:23 PM

FROM SCENE: Vehicle into pole in Dayton

UPDATE @ 9:24 p.m.

Four people have been taken to the hospital, one with a broken leg, after an accident on Main Street at Santa Clara Avenue.

According to police, the driver lost control of the vehicle and hit an RTA pole. 

The corner at the intersection is notorious for accidents because of its curve and speed limit, Sgt. Ryan Halburnt of Dayton PD said.

At least one occupant had to be freed from entrapment by crews on the scene. 

UPDATE @ 8:45 p.m.

Four people have been taken to the hospital after a single-vehicle accident on Main Street at Santa Clara Avenue. 

According to our crews on scene, the vehicle was occupied by two children and two adults, who have been taken to a hospital with non life-threatening injuries. 

Crews had to extricate at least one occupant after the vehicle crashed into a pole. 

FIRST REPORT

Crews have responded to the scene of an accident on N. Main Street at Santa Clara Avenue. 

According our crews, a vehicle has crashed into a pole and crews are extricating an occupant.

Main Street has been closed as a result of the accident. 

Unknown on injuries. 

We will update this developing story.

Greene County man targeted in raid sued federal government twice

Published: Thursday, October 19, 2017 @ 6:24 PM

JOEL MONTGOMERY
JOEL MONTGOMERY

The Greene County man whose house was raided by law enforcement for the second time in two years Thursday morning is a former Wright-Patterson Air Force Base employee who twice sued the federal government, according to court documents.

RELATED: Property owner arrest prompts FBI search warrant in Greene County

Both suits ended with a stipulation of dismissal filed in August 2014, more than a year before a 2015 raid at Joel B. Montgomery’s Spring Valley home. That search revealed more than 170 weapons, some being fully automatic, according to the Greene County Sheriff’s Office. No federal criminal charges show up in publicly-available online federal court records.

RELATED: Dozens of firearms seized in Greene County 

This news organization has attempted to reach the lawyers involved in Montgomery’s lawsuits.

Montgomery, 48, sued the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the United States Air Force, the Air Force’s office of special investigation and some individuals alleging unlawful electronic surveillance of him, according to a complaint filed in 2013 in Dayton’s U.S. District Court.

In that lawsuit, Montgomery said he found a GPS device underneath his vehicle, a camera in the WPAFB office in which he worked and a bug in his home, all from 2006 to 2007. At the time, Montgomery said he had certain security clearance and worked for the National Air and Space Intelligence Center (NASIC) and at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), according to the complaint.

In 2007, Montgomery sued General Dynamics, the U.S. Dept. of Defense, the Air Force and an individual for slanderous material that caused him to lose his job and for his company, M and M Aviation, to lose its Air Force contract dealing with “Tactical and Theater Missile Warning Systems,” according to that complaint.

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Montgomery’s suit said that from 2002 to 2004 he was a program manager in charge of the Electro-Optical Materials Intelligence Group of GDAIS, a Dept. of Defense contractor. The complaint said that because of derogatory information, Montgomery was placed on leave without pay and later terminated.

United passenger dragged from plane reaches settlement with airline

Published: Thursday, April 27, 2017 @ 3:19 PM
Updated: Thursday, April 27, 2017 @ 4:36 PM

VIDEO: Passenger Removed From United Airlines Flight

A Kentucky doctor who made headlines earlier this month when he was dragged off a United Airlines flight in Chicago has settled with the airline, attorneys said Thursday in a news release.

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Dr. David Dao suffered numerous injuries when he was dragged off a flight bound for Kentucky on April 9 after refusing to give up his seat.

The confrontation between Dao, 69, and three Chicago Department of Aviation officers was caught on video by passengers on the flight. The footage quickly spread on social media.

>> Related: United passenger suffered broken nose, teeth while being dragged from plane

Attorneys for Dao declined to share details of the settlement, citing a confidentiality provision in the agreement. Attorney Thomas Demetrio praised Oscar Munoz, CEO of United's parent company, in a statement.

"Mr. Munoz said he was going to do the right thing, and he has," Demetrio said. "In addition, United has taken full responsibility for what happened on Flight 3411, without attempting to blame others, including the city of Chicago. For this acceptance of corporate accountability, United is to be applauded."

Dao was hospitalized for days after the incident on Flight 3411 with injuries that included a severe concussion, a broken nose and an unspecified injury to his sinuses. He lost two front teeth in the scuffle, Demetrio said.

WATCH: Attorneys for United Airlines Passenger Dragged from Plane

"Dr. Dao has become the unintended champion for the adoption of changes which will certainly help improve the lives of literally millions of travelers," Demetrio said.

The settlement was reached on the same day United announced policy changes aimed at preventing a similar situation from happening to other passengers. Among the changes was the announcement that the airline will offer travelers as much as $10,000 to give up their seats on overbooked flights.

>> Related:United unveils 10 policy changes, will pay bumped passengers up to $10,000

Previously, the airline would offer up to $1,350, according to Bloomberg.

A number of other airlines also announced policy changes aimed at offering passengers more incentive to delay flights in cases of overbooking and to ensure that they are not taken off planes after boarding.

United's response in the immediate aftermath of the confrontation was widely criticized. Munoz first defended the airline and described Dao as "belligerent" before publicly apologizing days later and vowing to do better.

The officers who pulled Dao from the United flight were placed on leave after the incident.

>> Related: Police who dragged passenger from United flight stand by use of force

The agency released a report on Monday in which the officer who pulled Dao from his seat, James Long, gave his version of events. Long said Dao was verbally and physically abusive and was flailing his arms before he lost his balance and struck his mouth on an armrest.

The department's roughly 300 officers guard the city's two main airports but are not part of the regular Chicago police force. They receive less training than police officers do and cannot carry guns inside the terminals.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Nickel a pill: Mayor Whaley’s prescription painkiller surcharge plan

Published: Wednesday, October 18, 2017 @ 11:10 AM


            Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley proposed new state surcharges for prescription pain medicine to combat the opioid crisis. STAFF
Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley proposed new state surcharges for prescription pain medicine to combat the opioid crisis. STAFF

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley, a Democratic candidate for Ohio governor, today proposed charging a nickel per dose surcharge for every prescription painkiller pill sold in the state.

State data show that 631 million doses of opioids were distributed in Ohio, and a nickel surcharge would generate $31.5 million per year to increase funding for local police and fire responders, substance abuse stabilization centers and state psychiatric hospitals, Whaley said.

“With those dollars, we will return resources to our communities they so desperately need to fight this epidemic,” she said.

RELATED: City of Dayton sues drug makers for role in overdose epidemic

Ohio would be the first state in the nation to take this action, Whaley said, though Washington and California lawmakers have proposed similar types of legislation that would tax or charge opiate makers to pay for addiction prevention and treatment programs.

Dayton was the first city in Ohio and the fourth nationwide to sue drug companies, distributors and doctors that city officials say were responsible for the crisis.

During her announcement this morning, Whaley pointed to a joint investigation by the Washington Post and 60 Minutes that found that Congress, after a large lobbying effort, weakened federal law enforcement’s ability to go after drug distributors even as opioid-related deaths surged.

A law passed by Congress made it “virtually impossible” for the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration to freeze suspicious narcotic shipments from drug companies, according to the investigation.

Whaley criticized Congress for stripping power from federal law enforcement, remarking that Congress took “the E out of the DEA.”

2 children killed, 1 man hurt in Colorado stabbing

Published: Tuesday, October 17, 2017 @ 6:55 AM

2 Children Killed And 1 Man Hurt After Stabbing In Colorado

Two children were killed and one man injured in a stabbing early Tuesday in Colorado Springs, Colorado.

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