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$1M+ endorsed for companies planning to create 121 new jobs

Published: Friday, December 08, 2017 @ 10:42 AM

A two-story interior section of the Third Street Dayton Arcade. The city of Dayton Friday pulled a request for $1 million in Montgomery County ED/GE funding to redevelop the arcade — but another funding request is expected in the spring. TY GREENLEES / STAFF
A two-story interior section of the Third Street Dayton Arcade. The city of Dayton Friday pulled a request for $1 million in Montgomery County ED/GE funding to redevelop the arcade — but another funding request is expected in the spring. TY GREENLEES / STAFF

Plans by a Canadian company to build its North American headquarters in Vandalia, creating 35 new jobs, emerged as a clear favorite Friday among a committee of Montgomery County officials weighing requests for public funds.

In total, all the development projects the committee considered are expected to create 121 new jobs while protecting 709 existing jobs.

The committee decided which projects they would like to see funded and by how much. The next step is a vote by the County Commission, which usually approves the recommendations.

RELATEDBusinesses plan nearly 550 new jobs in Dayton area

Eight local communities asked for more than $1.42 million to boost business moves within or to those communities. One problem: The county only had only a little over $1 million to offer in what the county calls the “ED/GE” (Economic Development/Government Equity) program.

But when the city of Dayton withdrew its request for $1 million to support the remaking of its historical downtown arcade, the landscape immediately changed.

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“That should make this committee’s work just a little bit easier,” said Joe Tuss, county administrator.

Ford Weber, development director for the city of Dayton, said city staff wasn’t yet ready with projected construction costs and other preparatory work.

“This is a very complex project with historic buildings,” Weber said, adding: “This is our No. 1 economic development priority.”

A request from Dayton for the arcade will likely return in the ED/GE program’s spring funding round. Tuss said the county will have $2 million allocated for the program next year.

MOREGE lays off 12,000: What we know about the local impact

Vandalia request $400,000 for MSW to help with renovations at 6161 Ventnor Ave.

MSW is an Ontario-based plastic extrusion company. The company was recently ranked No. 83 on a business magazine’s list of the fastest growing Canadian companies.

The project represents direct foreign investment in the Dayton area, much like Hematite in Englewood and Fuyao in Moraine, noted Chris Kershner, an executive with the Dayton Area Chamber of Commerce.

“I want to see more of those,” Kershner said.

Erik Collins said MSW is researching the local building, and he didn’t know if failure to get the full requested $400,000 would cause the company to look elsewhere.

Dan Foley, Montgomery County commissioner, suggested setting aside $300,000 for MSW, a number that was later bumped up to $320,000.

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Other ED/GE projects approved Friday, and the amounts those companies are slated to receive include:

N12Technologies Inc. was recommended to get $50,000 in a project that would create 10 jobs in Kettering. Also in Kettering, Northwestern Tools was recommended for $80,000 for a project that is expected to create 12 jobs and protect 25 current jobs.

The city of Centerville asked for $250,000 for Aeroseal, to create an expected 19 new jobs at the former Planet Ford dealership site on East Alex-Bell Road. The committee recommended $170,000.

In Huber Heights, the committee recommended $80,000 for Trimble, which wants to build a new workspace to facilitate testing and demonstration of products when the weather is poor.

Staco Energy Corp. was recommended for $150,000 for a $7 million project would create four new jobs and retain 62 existing ones.

A new Misumi USA distribution center in West Carrollton tied to Dayton Progress was recommended for $150,000. That project is expected to create 20 new jobs.

And in Harrison Twp., $75,000 was recommended for Staub Manufacturing Solutions, which wants to create six new jobs while retaining 28 current ones.

Since 2012, ED/GE-funded projects have created 4,718 new local jobs total — above the 2,058 jobs those employers had originally pledged — and retained 2,931 existing jobs, Collins said.

In that time, $6 million in ED/GE funding has resulted in $452 million in private investment in the Dayton area, he said.

Wright Patt: Workers to show up Monday even if shutdown occurs

Published: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 5:46 PM


            Wright-Patterson Air Force Base employs more than 27,000 employees and is the largest single-site employer in Ohio. The base has a $4.1 billion economic impact in Ohio. TY GREENLEES / STAFF
Wright-Patterson Air Force Base employs more than 27,000 employees and is the largest single-site employer in Ohio. The base has a $4.1 billion economic impact in Ohio. TY GREENLEES / STAFF

Thousands of Wright-Patterson employees were expected to report to work Monday morning for further instructions “to carry out orderly shutdown activities” if a partial federal government closure stuck at midnight Friday, base authorities said.

The scenario could be a replay of October 2013 when most civil service employees at Wright-Patterson were sent home on furlough at the state’s largest single-site employer with more than 27,000 personnel, but how many might be impacted in another temporary closure could not be answered Friday.

“It is difficult to determine how many employees would be impacted because a determination of the furlough parameters has not been released,” base spokeswoman Marie Vanover said in an email.

All military personnel, regardless of their job, would report for duty, according to the Defense Department.

RELATED: Threat of government shutdown wearing on workers

Those who stay on the job — both military and civilian — will not be paid until a Congressional appropriations bill is passed, according to the Pentagon. The National Museum of the U.S. Air Force planned to remain open over the weekend unless it receives a shutdown order, according to spokeswoman Diana Bachert. She said the museum would issue an update to the news media, and post an alert on the museum’s social media sites and its website if it must close.

Retired Col. Cassie B. Barlow, installation commander of Wright-Patterson the last time a shutdown hit, said Friday carrying out shutdown activities were “very complex” and “all encompassing.”

“I feel sorry for the folks on the base right now and what they have to go through,” she said. “It’s very frustrating. It’s frustrating for the commanders, but it’s also frustrating for all of the employees because they are starved for information right now and they’re listening to the news …

“It’s a stressful time especially when there’s a potential to not get paid,” she said, adding it was “no way” to treat employees or run a business.

The Pentagon issued a contingency plan Friday that listed broad categories where employees may be allowed to stay on the job, such as police, fire and medical services and other duties deemed “essential” to national security.

RELATED: What if a government shutdown happened: Five things to know

The reverberations of a government shutdown would be similar to the last one struck in 2013, according to Air Force Capt. Hope Cronin.

“We are hopeful that there is enough time for Congress to prevent a lapse in appropriations,” she said Friday afternoon. “However, at this time, we must plan for a range of scenarios” that include a short-term stopgap funding measure, a budget deal or a shutdown.

Air Force reservists were expected to attend a previously funded drill weekend Saturday and Sunday at the base with the 445th Airlift Wing, said spokeswoman Lt. Col. Cynthia Harris.

Among other impacts, U.S. District Court in Dayton would remain open, federal Judge Walter Rice said Friday. “I don’t expect any immediate change,” he said.

RELATED: Will a shutdown happen? Wright-Patterson in holding pattern

The U.S. Postal Service mail delivery and post offices would stay open and Social Security payments would continue to recipients, according to authorities.

The Ohio National Guard issued a statement Friday saying the agency would continue national defense operations and respond to state emergencies.

At the University of Dayton Research Institute, which has millions of dollars in federal contracts employing some 200 people, some employees may be prevented from doing their jobs and the institute “would need to find other work for them as possible,” John Leland, UDRI executive director, said in a statement. “Other contract work might have to shift temporarily shift from a government installation to a UD facility.”

Those changes are “disruptive” and “causes waste at taxpayer expense,” he added.

Head Start education programs for pre-schoolers were expected to be open Monday if a shutdown occurred, but a long-term government closure may have an impact on operations, according to Barbara Haxton, executive director of the Ohio Head State Association in Dayton.

Truck flips on its side after hit-and-run collision, driver says

Published: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 4:51 PM


            Middletown emergency crews responded to The Alameda and Superior Avenue Friday afternoon after a pick-up truck rolled over. RICK McCRABB / STAFF
Middletown emergency crews responded to The Alameda and Superior Avenue Friday afternoon after a pick-up truck rolled over. RICK McCRABB / STAFF

The driver of a Ford F-15o pickup truck said someone ran the stop sign at the corner of The Alameda and Superior Avenue on Friday afternoon in Middletown, causing him to lose continue and flip his vehicle.

The male driver said he was traveling on Superior Avenue when a white vehicle ran the stop sign and collided with his pick-up truck. The truck flipped on its side, and the driver was uninjured, he said.

READ MORE: No serious injuries among children in Butler County school bus-truck collision

The vehicle that ran the stop sign drove off, according to the driver of the pickup truck.

Middletown police were investigating the accident.

A tow truck flipped the pickup truck back over. It appeared the truck sustained major damage.

Dayton human relations official accepts Toledo job

Published: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 3:47 PM


            Catherine Crosby, who has worked for Dayton for more than a decade, will become the Toledo mayor’s new chief of staff.
Catherine Crosby, who has worked for Dayton for more than a decade, will become the Toledo mayor’s new chief of staff.

The executive director of Dayton’s Human Relations Council has accepted a job with the city of the Toledo.

Catherine Crosby, who has worked for the council since 2005, will become Toledo’s new chief of staff, according to an announcement today from Toledo Mayor Wade Kapszukiewicz.

Crosby, a well-known community member,

serves as board secretary to the National Community Reinvestment Coalition and is a member of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights Ohio Advisory Committee. She has been the council’s executive director since 2012.

MORE: What if a government shutdown happened? Five things to know

“Catherine Crosby has been a tremendous leader for the city of Dayton,” Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley said in a statement. “Dayton’s loss is Toledo’s gain.”

The Human Relations Council is in charge of civil rights enforcement for residents and investigates and adjudicates discrimination complaints related to housing, employment, public accommodation and credit. The council also assists minority- and women-owned businesses and promotes equal treatment of citizens.

Crosby, 40, who is from Cleveland, earned a bachelor’s degree in accounting from Wilberforce University and a master’s degree in public administration from Wright State University.

“Katy has myriad experience that she will bring to Toledo to help continue our strategic improvement,” Mayor Kapszukiewicz said.

“I am very excited about this opportunity to use my diverse experience to implement the mayor’s ambitious plan for Toledo,” Ms. Crosby said. “Toledo has a lot of similarities to Dayton, including a welcoming community, minor league baseball, booming downtown development, and a great waterfront. I am looking forward to making new friends and playing an important role in Toledo’s continued growth.”

Amazon announces final 20 cities in the running for second headquarters

Published: Thursday, January 18, 2018 @ 9:59 AM
Updated: Thursday, January 18, 2018 @ 9:52 AM

Amazon Announces Cities Still In Consideration For Second Headquarters

Officials with technology giant Amazon on Thursday announced that the company has narrowed down its list of possible sites for its second headquarters to 20 metropolitan areas.

>> Read more trending news

The company said it got nearly 240 proposals from across the U.S. Canada and Mexico.

“All the proposals showed tremendous enthusiasm and creativity,” Holly Sullivan, with Amazon Public Policy. “Through this process we learned about many new communities across North America that we will consider as locations for future infrastructure investment and job creation.”