$100M Water Street: New apartments, condos, offices may be on the way

Published: Tuesday, November 14, 2017 @ 11:16 AM
Updated: Tuesday, November 14, 2017 @ 1:55 PM


            New condos, apartments, offices may be headed to Dayton’s Water Street area.
New condos, apartments, offices may be headed to Dayton’s Water Street area.

The Water Street District, which has already dramatically transformed the northeastern section of downtown Dayton, could add even more housing and offices to the rapidly growing mixed-use development.

RELATED: Numbers don’t lie: Downtown Dayton’s 2017 was HUGE

The Water Street developers are looking at building a four-story apartment building just east of Fifth Third Field, which could contain 110 new apartments and 10,000 square feet of restaurant space, according to information shared today at the Downtown Dayton Partnership’s annual special improvement district meeting.

The district’s investments already have topped $100 million.

The developers also are looking at potentially developing a six-story apartment building that sits west of the Delco Lofts apartments building, which opened 133 apartments earlier this year.

“We have a lot of opportunity to grow the district,” said Jason Woodard, principal of Woodard Development, during Tuesday’s meeting.

The Delco building sits next to the ballpark, on the west end of the field. Directly adjacent to it is the Lincoln Storage building. There’s a grassy lot just west of the storage building that could be redeveloped.

Potential plans for the “Lincoln Liner” building could include 60 apartments and street level retail and parking, according to a map of the water street shared by developers Woodard Development and Crawford Hoying. The map identifies current and potential projects in the district.

RELATED: Water Street developer plans new downtown residences next to Fifth Third Field

Other potential projects could include a four-story, 60,000-square-foot office building, south of the bridge and the Water Street apartments along the river.

And the developers are exploring redeveloping vacant land at Deeds Point to belongs to the city of Dayton, which they have an option to purchase. Deeds Point sits at the intersection of the Miami and Mad rivers, across from the Water Street District’s apartments along the waterway.

The land could be turned into 48 condominiums for sale, featuring townhomes and flats, according to the developers’ map.

Water Street has seen explosive growth. The district’s 215 apartments along the river are fully occupied, and so is its four-story office building at Monument and Patterson Boulevard.

The Delco Lofts, which opened a few of months ago, has 133 apartments, 110 of which are leased. A new Fairfield Inn and Suites is under construction, which should open in the fall of 2018.

The developers are building 54 new apartments by the Mad River, which should open in the spring.

Dayton reaches $1.5M settlement over nuisance odors

Published: Wednesday, November 22, 2017 @ 2:48 PM

Dayton reaches $1.5M settlement over nuisance odors

The city of Dayton has agreed to accept a nearly $1.5 million settlement with an agricultural and industrial company over discharge issues that led to sewer blockages and foul odors.

Cargill’s corn milling plant in Dayton produces about 3 million to 4 million gallons of waste every day that is fed into the city’s sanitary sewer system, city officials said.

The city took enforcement action against the company because its discharge was causing blockages in the sanitary sewer as well as an unpleasant smell, said John Musto, Dayton’s chief trial counsel.

The blockage issues have been resolved, officials said, and the city and Cargill will work together to try to reduce smelly hydrogen sulfide levels in the waste water system associated with the company’s discharge.

“The settlement also provides a framework for the parties to work together to identify a cost-effective method for preventing odors in the city sewer serving the corn mill,” said Kelly Sheehan, spokeswoman for Cargill.

MORE: Dayton faces long-term budget issues, despite income tax hike

Since 2014, the city of Dayton issued Cargill a series of notices of violation and administrative orders for not following regulations related to pretreatment of wastewater discharge, officials said.

The company, which has a plant at 3201 Needmore Road, appealed about 41 of the notices.

But the city and Cargill have reached a settlement in which the city agrees to rescind the notices of violation and the company will drop its pending appeals.

Cargill was required to pay penalties to the city to appeal the notices, which were held until the appeals were decided, Sheehan said.

MORE: Why the NACCP wants Dayton voters to decide on traffic cameras

Under the settlement, the city will keep that money to help pay for odor control trials and sewer cleaning, Sheehan said.

“Cargill’s wet corn mill in Dayton, Ohio, takes great pride in operating in compliance with all environmental laws and Cargill’s own strict environmental standards,” she said.

Cargill also agreed to stop using lime in the pretreatment process last year, and there have been no blockages in the system since that time, said Musto.

Cargill and the city expect to discuss setting parameters on the company’s wastewater discharge to reduce sulfates in the system, which causes hydrogen sulfide, leading to stinky odors, Musto said.

The city wanted a resolution that addresses toxic odors in the wastewater system but that is also cost-effective for Cargill, who is an important employer and community partner, said Dayton City Manager Shelley Dickstein.

“This takes care of issues from the past,” she said.

Suspect in Pennsylvania police officer's shooting death in custody; mother also arrested

Published: Tuesday, November 21, 2017 @ 5:46 AM
Updated: Tuesday, November 21, 2017 @ 7:49 AM

Rahmael Sal Holt
New Kensington police
Rahmael Sal Holt(New Kensington police)

Rahmael Sal Holt, the suspect in the shooting death of New Kensington, Pennsylvania, Officer Brian Shaw, is in custody after a days-long manhunt.

>> Watch the news report here

Police had been searching for Holt since Friday night’s shooting. He was arrested Monday morning at a home on Ladora Way in Pittsburgh’s Hazelwood neighborhood after law enforcement agencies received a tip that he was there.

In addition to Holt, eight other people were arrested – including his mother.

>> Visit WPXI.com for complete coverage

Shaw, 25, was killed after he pulled over a Jeep on Friday in a traffic stop on Leishman Avenue. According to court documents, the Jeep never stopped and Holt, who allegedly killed Shaw, fled and Shaw pursued him on foot. 

>> Suspect named in Pennsylvania police officer's shooting death

Tavon Harper, who police say was driving the Jeep, took off, police said. Holt then fired multiple shots, killing Shaw, according to court documents.

Shaw was transported to Allegheny Valley Hospital, where he later died. 

>> Read more trending news 

WPXI confirmed with multiple sources that Shaw was ambushed that night and at least one of the bullets went through a soft spot in his body armor.

Trenton youth on bicycle struck by car

Published: Saturday, November 18, 2017 @ 6:31 PM

Trenton police are investigating after a youth on a bicycle was struck by a car early Saturday evening.

A police dispatcher said the accident happened about 5:45 p.m. at East State Street and Sal Boulevard.

MORE: Weather watches, advisories in effect

The dispatcher said the youth was taken to an area hospital but that no further information was available.

Jail captain charged with assault for pepper-spraying inmate

Published: Tuesday, November 14, 2017 @ 6:22 PM

Brookville woman pepper sprayed in seven-point harness at Montgomery County Jail

The Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office captain whose pepper-spraying of a restrained inmate — and disappearance of records of the incident — spurred a federal probe and civil lawsuit pleaded not guilty today to a misdemeanor assault charge.

Capt. Judith Sealey was charged in Dayton Municipal Court on Nov. 8 for pepper spraying Amber Swink while Swink was strapped into a restraint chair in the county jail in November 2015.

“We entered a not guilty plea on her behalf,” said her attorney, Anthony VanNoy. “I believe it’s the wrong charge. I believe they should not have charged her criminally.”

“I recognize what the video depicts, but it doesn’t tell the entire story of what went on.”

After Montgomery County Prosecutor Mat Heck Jr. announced in May that a grand jury found there was insufficient evidence to bring felony assault charges, the case was referred to Dayton city prosecutors to consider misdemeanor charges.

RELATED: Dayton asks Cincinnati to review jail pepper spray case

Dayton Chief Prosecutor Stephanie Cook handed the decision on whether to press charges to Cincinnati city prosecutors. Dayton officials said they wanted to avoid any appearance of conflict because Cook sits on a jail advisory committee created in response to lawsuits from Swink and others.

SPECIAL REPORT: Justice in the Jailhouse — Lawsuits, accusations plague county jails in the region

Swink settled her lawsuit against Montgomery County in August, with the county paying $375,000.

Federal agents have not announced any findings in the case, which includes concerns over how and why video and other records of Sealey pepper-spraying Swink disappeared from county records and only surfaced through Swink’s lawsuit.

RELATED: Missing paperwork raises questions about pepper spray probe

This news outlet reached out to Montgomery County Sheriff Phil Plummer for comment. This story will be updated if comment is received.