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Attempted home invasion in Houston caught on surveillance camera

Published: Friday, December 29, 2017 @ 1:10 AM

Surveillance camera.
Clive Rose/Getty Images
Surveillance camera.(Clive Rose/Getty Images)

An attempted home invasion in a Houston neighborhood was caught on security cameras early Thursday, and the residents of the house said he is “still shook up” after watching the video, KTRK reported.

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Chris Riggs said he had two camera angles of the attempted break-in, which occurred at 4:17 a.m. One is situated above his front door, while the other has a view of the front doorbell.

The video shows three men running up to the door. One man is carrying an assault rifle while another has a pistol, KTRK reported. Twice, the men tried to kick in the door. When they were unable to do so, they left, authorities said.

“We were asleep. Dead asleep,” Riggs told KTRK. “Didn't hear the door.”

When Riggs saw a footprint on the front door Thursday afternoon, he checked his cameras and said he was shocked.

“It's very scary to see somebody almost invade your privacy and hurt you. They're not coming in to hold your hand and say, ‘hey where's all your stuff at?’” Riggs told KTRK. “They were probably coming in to hurt us.”

Riggs credits the security bar often called a “kick door stop” that he recently bought for keeping his family safe. He said he was sharing the surveillance video to warn others of the potential violence, KTRK reported.

"It's scary:" When a Houston man spotted a suspicious footprint on his front door, he checked his security camera. The homeowner tells ABC13-Jessica Willey why he thinks they couldn't get through the door.

Posted by ABC13 Houston on Thursday, December 28, 2017

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Winter Weather Advisory continues, Winter Storm Warning issued for some

Published: Tuesday, March 20, 2018 @ 3:57 AM
Updated: Wednesday, March 21, 2018 @ 12:04 AM

Here is the latest look at timing and totals of the snow.


  • Winter Weather Advisory continues until 8 p.m. Wednesday for all 
  • Winter Storm Warning issued for Butler and Warren Counties
  • Mix of rain and snow changing to snow overnight
  • 3 to 5 inches possible through this morning

>>Track the latest conditions with Live Doppler 7 Radar

>>UPDATING: School and business delays and closings


TODAY: Snow continuing this morning, tapering by noon, Storm Center 7 Chief Meteorologist Eric Elwell said. The Winter Weather Advisory continues for all until 8 p.m. Wednesday. A Winter Storm Warning has been issued for Butler and Warren Counties until 8 p.m. Wednesday as well

Total accumulations of about 3 to 5 inches expected with isolated areas picking up higher amounts. Gusty winds, creating blowing snow, will continue especially early in the day. High temperatures will hold in the mid-30s.

5 Day Forecast with Chief Meteorologist Eric Elwell

RELATED: Commutes on Tuesday, Wednesday will be messy: What you need to know

>> Don’t deflate tires to drive on ice, snow

THURSDAY: Skies will become mostly sunny, with high temperatures in the low 40s.

>> Remember these things when driving in snow

FRIDAY:  Sunny skies to start the day. Clouds will increase in the afternoon. Highs in the low 40s.

>> 5-Day Forecast

SATURDAY: There is a chance of snow in the morning, possibly mixed with rain. A wintry mix or rain will linger into the afternoon. Highs will top out near 40.

>> WHIO Doppler 7 Interactive Radar

SUNDAY: Skies are expected to clear, with highs in the lower 40s.

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Austin package explosions: Sixth blast not related to serial bombings, police say

Published: Tuesday, March 20, 2018 @ 8:38 PM
Updated: Tuesday, March 20, 2018 @ 8:38 PM

Package Explodes At FedEx Facility In Shertz,Texas

Authorities responded to another explosion Tuesday night in south Austin at a Goodwill store that left one person injured, but police said it’s not related to a string of serial bombings that have rocked the city over the past few weeks.

Earlier Tuesday investigators linked a fifth bomb blast overnight Tuesday at a FedEx ground delivery facility northeast of San Antonio to the deadly package bombs in Austin. 

>> READ MORE: Trump says 'it's not easy to find' culprit in first public comment on Austin bombings'Hold your leaders accountable': Chance the Rapper tweets about Austin bombingsPhotos: Austin police investigate explosionsFor investigators, a race to decode hidden message in Austin bombingsMap shows location of 4 Austin bombsAustin explosions: 2 men hurt in fourth blast this monthOfficials increase reward to $115,000 for information on Austin bombingsMan held in SXSW threat ruled out as bomb suspect, police sayAustin package explosions: 3 blasts appear connected, claim 2 lives, police sayThe Roots' SXSW show canceled after bomb threat; man arrestedAustin package bombings: Friends remember victims Draylen Mason, Anthony HouseMORE


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How did crucifixion kill Jesus?

Published: Tuesday, March 20, 2018 @ 11:46 PM

Actor James Burke-Dunsmore playing Jesus drags the cross during the Wintershall's 'The Passion of Jesus' production on Good Friday in Trafalgar Square on April 3, 2015 in London, England. Good Friday is a Christian religious holiday before Easter Sunday, which commemorates the crucifixion of Jesus Christ on the cross. The Wintershall's theatrical production of 'The Passion of Jesus' includes a cast of 100 actors, horses, a donkey and authentic costumes of Roman soldiers in the 12th Legion of the Roman Army.  (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)
Dan Kitwood/Getty Images
Actor James Burke-Dunsmore playing Jesus drags the cross during the Wintershall's 'The Passion of Jesus' production on Good Friday in Trafalgar Square on April 3, 2015 in London, England. Good Friday is a Christian religious holiday before Easter Sunday, which commemorates the crucifixion of Jesus Christ on the cross. The Wintershall's theatrical production of 'The Passion of Jesus' includes a cast of 100 actors, horses, a donkey and authentic costumes of Roman soldiers in the 12th Legion of the Roman Army. (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)(Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

On Friday, Christians around the world commemorate with prayers and fasting the death of Jesus Christ, three days before the arrival of Easter and the hope of the Resurrection.

The church calls on believers to solemnly reflect on the pain and suffering of Jesus of Nazareth, particularly beginning at 3 p.m. when it is believed Jesus died as he hung on a cross outside the city of Jerusalem.

While the Bible gives agonizing details of the crucifixion of Jesus, what do we know about what happens to a body undergoing this sadistic method of execution?

How does crucifixion kill you?

First, the history

Crucifixion is a gruesome mode of execution, and that’s why the Romans in Jesus’ day used it. A method of control and intimidation, Roman authorities used crucifixion to rid their cities of slaves, heinous criminals and, most important to the empire, insurgents.

Crucifixion was likely first used in what is modern day Iran. The vicious method of eliminating one’s enemies spread throughout the ancient world to Greece where Alexander the Great was known to have used it.

From there, the Romans adopted the practice and elevated it to a level that was unprecedented – at one point crucifying 500 people a day. It was practiced from the 6th century BC until the 4th century AD. The Roman emperor Constantine I banned the practice in 337 AD.

Why use crucifixion?

The Romans did not lack for ways to kill their enemies, but crucifixion allowed for two things – humiliation and a slow, painful death. The punishment was a method of intimidation that the Romans raised to an art form.

One Roman historian wrote of an event that saw 2,000 crucified on one day for the amusement of an emperor.

The process

Crucifixion followed a bloody script of sorts that maximized the suffering and prolonged death. It began when the one being crucified was stripped of his clothing then beaten with a flagrum, a short-handled whip made with lengths of leather that had bone and iron balls woven into the strips.

The person was beaten savagely with the whip which tore flesh then muscle, weakening the victim through blood loss and shock. While the aim was to inflict maximum injury, that part of the process was not intended to kill. 

After the beating -- where ribs were often broken from the repeated blows -- the victim would be forced to pick up and carry the beam of the cross he was to be hanged on.

Crucifixions were held outside of the city, and while the upright part of the cross, called the stripe, was permanently placed in the area the crucifixions took place, the crossbar, called the patibulum, had to be transported there. The patibulum usually weighed between 75 and 100 pounds.

We often see images of Jesus Christ nailed to a cross that is high above the ground, but this likely isn’t a true representation of Roman crucifixions.

The first crucifixions had the victims suspended just above the ground so their feet would not touch holy ground. By the time the Romans were crucifying people, the crosses were probably from 7 to 9 feet tall

Not all crosses were the familiar “t” shape we see depicted in art. Some resembled the letters “X” and “Y,” while some looked like an uppercase “T.” Some people, like the Apostle Peter, were crucified upside down on an inverted cross.

Some researchers say Jesus may have been crucified on a stake instead of a cross, which was another method of crucifixion.

While we read in the Bible of Jesus’ hands and feet being nailed the cross, that wasn’t always the case, either. When the hands were attached to the cross, it was usually done with spikes being driven into the wrists, not the hands, to better support the weight of the victim. Most victims, according to the writing of historians of the day, had their hands tied to the cross with rope, their feet nailed into the sides near the bottom of the cross.

The victims knees would be bent at around 45 degrees before their feet were nailed to the cross. The position eventually makes it impossible to hold one’s self upright, and the person would begin sag on the cross. The body’s weight would eventually pull the shoulders out of socket, thrusting the chest forward where it would become impossible to take in a breath.

It is written in the Bible that at one point Jesus was offered a drink of wine and a mild pain killer called gall or myrhh, and he declined it. The practice of offering those being crucified the drink is documented in other historical accounts. It was a service provided by a group of women from Jerusalem. 

How do you die?

If you survived the shock and blood loss from the beating, then were able to carry the patibulum to the place where you were to be crucified, then lived through your feet and your hands having spikes driven into them, your final misery was just beginning.

There are many theories as to what kills you as you hang on a cross. From blood loss from the beating, to shock and dehydration, it could be any combination of the factors, scientists believe.

The Royal Society of Medicine in 2006 published an article that centered on Jesus’ crucifixion, chronicling nine possible causes of death. And while suffocation from the weight of one’s body dangling from a cross has long been believed to be the cause of death in crucifixion, others think the process is a more complicated chain reaction of events.

The researchers from the RSM study believed death came to those crucified by one or more of the body’s failing processes.

The study suggested that as the person suspended on a cross struggles to breath, that lack of oxygen would trigger damage to tissue and veins causing blood to leak into the lungs and the heart. The lungs would stiffen and the heart become constricted from the pressure, making it difficult, then impossible to pump blood throughout the body. The lack of oxygenated blood would eventually cause each body system to fail and death would follow.

It could take hours, or, in some cases, days, but it was only a matter of time before death would come. 

In the biblical accounts of Jesus’ death, the process took six hours, and, in the end, he cried out to God.

Matthew 27:50-51 "And Jesus cried out again with a loud voice, and yielded up the ghost. And behold, the veil of the temple was torn in two from top to bottom; and the earth shook and the rocks were split.…"

Sources: GizmodoBelieve.comNIM; The Guardian

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Easter 2018: When is it; what is it; why isn't it on the same date every year?

Published: Tuesday, March 20, 2018 @ 11:14 PM
Updated: Tuesday, March 20, 2018 @ 11:14 PM

Fun Facts About Easter

“Hey, do you have any idea when Christmas is?” is not a question you usually hear in late November or early December.

Major holidays are stamped on our calendars, often with little symbols, in case you don't know, for instance, that a turkey means Thanksgiving. 

Easter, however, is different. The date of Easter, when Christians celebrate the risen Christ, is different every year. 

Many factors have contributed to keeping the date a guessing game, but the rolling calendar on Easter is due mainly to astronomy and a group of men who got together in the ancient city of Nicaea to come up with a system of deciding when to celebrate the holiest day in the Christian calendar.

Here is a look at the origins of the remembrance, the reason for the floating date and when Easter will be celebrated this year.

What is Easter?
On Easter, Christians celebrate the resurrection of Jesus Christ. 
Jesus of Nazareth was a carpenter who became an itinerant preacher at the age of 30. For the next three years, he drew thousands of followers in the relatively small area where he preached. 

When Jewish leaders and Roman officials began to feel threatened by his growing popularity, he was arrested as he came into Jerusalem for the Jewish festival of Passover. He stood trial, was found guilty by a crowd and was mocked, beaten and eventually crucified. Followers believe that Jesus rose from the dead on the third day after his crucifixion.

The Old Testament prophecy of a messiah being persecuted, then executed, then resurrected – all for the sins of his followers -- is believed by many to have been fulfilled with Jesus’ death.

Where in the Bible is the story of Jesus’ execution?
The story of Jesus’ death appears in all four of the Gospels of the New Testament. You’ll find them in Matthew 28, Mark 16, Luke 24 and John 18.

When is Easter this year?
Easter is on April 1 in 2018.

Why is it on different dates every year?

The answer is not a simple one. In 325 CE,  the Council of Nicaea, a gathering of Christian bishops, decided that there should be a more organized and universal way to decide when Easter would be celebrated. The council decided that the remembrance would be held the first Sunday after the first full moon occurring on or after the vernal equinox.

The date for the vernal equinox was based on the ecclesiastical approximation of March 21. If the full moon falls on a Sunday, Easter is delayed a week.

How early and how late can Easter be celebrated?
Easter can come as early as March 22, and as late as April 25 in the Gregorian calendar.

What does the word Easter mean?
It could be from the name of the fertility goddess Eostre. It could be from the Norse "eostur" or "eastur," meaning “the season of the growing sun,” or some combination of those terms and others from pagan festivals and ceremonies.

When was Easter first celebrated?
It’s not known when the first remembrance of Jesus’ death took place, but there are records of ceremonies beginning in the 2nd century. The celebrations were held around the Jewish Passover each year, a date that was dependent on the vernal equinox.

What are Good Friday and Maundy Thursday?
Good Friday commemorates the day on which Jesus was crucified. Maundy Thursday commemorates the Last Supper, the final meal that Jesus had with his disciples.

How did a bunny become a symbol?
No one is really sure about how the Easter Bunny came into being, but, he/she likely is a combination of several ancient harvest festival symbols. says the bunny could have come from the pagan festival of Eostre. Eostre is a goddess of fertility and, because of the rabbit’s reputation for, shall we say, productivity, the animal became the symbol for Eostre.

Historians believe it is likely that the festival with its bunny symbol made its way through Europe and gave birth to the Osterhase, or Oschter Haws – an egg-laying rabbit popular in German fiction. German immigrants brought with them to America the tradition of laying colored eggs as gifts in nests built by children during a spring festival. 

Eventually, the bunny started to bring candy and other gifts with the eggs on Easter morning as a sign of the celebration of new life.

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