Analysis uncovers fastest growing job fields

Published: Thursday, September 20, 2012 @ 11:47 PM

The best fields for landing a new job in the next 10 years are health care, math and technology, and social services.

Those fields are expected to be the nation’s and the region’s fastest growing this decade, based on analysis of labor statistics.

All jobs expected to take off are service jobs. The only exception is certain construction openings.

Health support jobs lead the way, with a nearly 34.5 percent jump to be seen nationally in jobs such as home health aides, therapy assistants and medical assistants. As of last year, this sector employed 15,850 people in the Dayton metro area, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The economy is still struggling to recover from a recession that left many workers finding their skills do not match the wants of employers. These projections give local residents an idea of the types of jobs that will offer the best prospects going forward.

“It really speaks to the long-term transition that we’ve had in this economy from a manufacturing base to a services base,” said LaVaughn Henry, vice president of the Cincinnati branch of the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland. His territory includes Dayton. “That’s where demand is going. That’s what always pulls job growth.”

Work in services or manufacturing today is knowledge intensive, said Mike Goldman, interim director of career services and associate director of career services for employer relations at Miami University.

“Education is essential today. The role of community colleges, the role of technical programs are more important than ever, especially for adult learners,” Goldman said.

More local people by the end of this decade will work in office, sales and food preparation jobs than anything else, according to Bureau of Labor Statistics data. Those are also some of the lowest paying occupations, with median pay in the Dayton area of no more than $33,000 a year.

The U.S. Bureau revises its 10-year forecasts every two years, having released 2020 estimates in March.

The analysis predicts for 24.9 million people to work in office and administrative jobs; 16.8 million to work in sales related jobs; and 12.2 million to work in food preparation throughout the U.S. by then.

Manufacturing jobs will still represent a big share of employment in the Dayton region, but not as much as they used to, said Lewis Horner, chief of work force research of Ohio’s Bureau of Labor Market Information. Statewide, production jobs are expected to decline through 2018, according to the most recent estimates.

“The biggest change that we’re going to see in terms of the job distribution in Ohio is unfortunately a decline in production occupations. There’s a variety of reasons for that. Production occupations are not going to go away, it’s still going to be a very significant part of the Ohio economy, but there will be fewer production occupation jobs and what that means is people are going to have to move out into other occupation jobs,” Horner said.

“If you look at the other areas that are strong growth, the computer and mathematical occupations, the health care technical occupations and support, those are occupations that you can’t, at least at the moment, easily replace a person with a machine,” he added.

More than 100,000 people currently work in manufacturing jobs in the 12-county area, according to the Dayton Region Manufacturers Association.

Thomas Traynor, chair of the economics department at Wright State University, does regional jobs forecasts twice a year.

Growth in health and manufacturing industries has flattened out in recent years in the Dayton area, based on Traynor’s analysis. But flat job growth in manufacturing is better than the declines that shed about 40,000 manufacturing jobs from 2001 to 2009, he said.

Professional and business services added about 5,000 jobs from 2010 to 2012, the most of any other sector, he said. But he doesn’t expect those gains to continue.

“In the next six months, I’m not really seeing a particular industry showing tremendous growth,” he said. “In a way, some of this is due to the sluggish national growth that we’ve been experiencing. Once the national economy picks up, I would expect health care and professional business services to pick up.”

Florida woman dies days after boyfriend’s slaying, birth of twins

Published: Friday, July 28, 2017 @ 3:59 AM

Hospital.
Hindustan Times/Hindustan Times via Getty Images
Hospital.(Hindustan Times/Hindustan Times via Getty Images)

Tragedy struck a Florida family within days, leaving three children without their parents. Days after a man was shot and killed, his girlfriend died from complications after giving birth to twins.

>> Read more trending news

On July 11, 26-year-old Jevaughn Suckoo was found shot and killed in the West Palm Beach apartment complex where he lived with his nearly 2-year-old daughter and pregnant girlfriend, Stephanie Caceres.

Three days later, Caceres gave birth to their twins, Jevaughn Jr. and Lailah.

On Wednesday, she died — the same day as Suckoo’s funeral. Family said she died from an infection from her C-section.

As family and friends mourn the couple, they are also thinking about the futures of their three children.

At Juan E. Batista Pediatrics in Lake Clarke Shores, where Caceres worked for four years, family, friends and coworkers gathered Thursday in front of dozens of donations given to the family in the wake of the sudden deaths. Office manager Lina Niemczyk, Caceres’ mother, Irma Meza, and Suckoo’s aunt, Joni Saunders, all spoke about the couple and their children.

“We’re just trying to figure out how to move forward from here,” Saunders said.

Niemczyk said Caceres had “an excellent work ethic” and was her “right and left hand” in the office. Niemczyk said the office and their patients are like a family, so everyone came together to gather items and money for Caceres’s children.

“Our goal is to secure their future,” Niemczyk said. “It’s a promise to their mom and dad.”

Police have made no arrests in Suckoo’s death.

A day after Caceres gave birth to the twins, she took to Facebook to express her distress.

“I just don’t understand how someone can have the heart to leave three kids without a father especially two that never got the chance to even meet him,” she wrote on her Facebook page. “They didn’t deserve this! I’m trying I really am to stay strong but this has to be the toughest battle I’ve ever had to fight.”

GoFundMe Page has been started for the three children.

The fact that my kids have to grow up without their father is killing me. I hear people talking about how their kids are...

Posted by Stephanie Caceres on Saturday, July 15, 2017

Senate deals major setback to Republican health care push

Published: Friday, July 28, 2017 @ 3:44 AM

Republican plans to approve a slimmed down bill to overhaul the Obama health law abruptly ran aground early on Friday morning in the U.S. Senate, as Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) refused to support a last minute “skinny” GOP bill, forcing Republican leaders back to the drawing board in their quest to get a bill to the President’s desk to rewire America’s health care system.

“I thought it was the right vote,” McCain told reporters as he left the Senate floor. Outside, there were cheers as the Arizona Senator – who has bedeviled members of both parties through his years – went home shortly after 2 am.

Here is how it looked from the halls of the U.S. Capitol:

1. McCain goes Maverick on health care. When the vote on the GOP ‘skinny bill’ was set to begin at about 12:35 am, it was obvious that Republicans might not have the votes to prevail, as Vice President Mike Pence lobbied McCain, Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME) and Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK). But all three stuck to their guns, and torpedoed the GOP effort on health care. McCain was the key, as he attracted the most attention from the Vice President during a 45 minute delay on the Senate floor. The Arizona Republican had made clear for days that he didn’t like the process, he didn’t like the details of the ‘skinny’ bill, and he wanted to see more bipartisan cooperation. McCain had his GOP colleagues gritting their teeth.

2. Republicans stunned by health care setback. The looks on the faces of GOP Senators told the whole story on the Senate floor, as the realization hit home that McCain was not going to vote with them. After the vote it was grim in the hallways just off the Senate floor. “It was a big setback,” Sen. Pat Toomey (R-PA) said tersely. “This is sad,” said Sen. Ron Johnson (R-WI). The normally chatty Sen. Ben Sasse (R-NE) pushed through a crowd of reporters without saying anything. “No, I don’t want to talk right now, Jamie,” Sen. James Lankford (R-OK) flatly said to me as he headed back to his office. What’s next now for the GOP on health care? “No big reforms,” said Sen. Bob Corker (R-TN). “That unfortunately will not occur.”

3. An unhappy President Donald Trump. After showering McCain with praise earlier in the week, when the 2008 Republican nominee for President returned to cast the key vote to begin this debate, Mr. Trump had to watch as McCain threw the bill into a Legislative Ditch. At 2:25 am, the President got on Twitter to issue his first reaction, taking the 51 Senators in both parties to task, and again repeating his threat to simply stand off to the side and watch the individual exchanges go down the drain. It’s not clear whether the White House will sanction bipartisan negotiations on health care, but it’s hard to imagine that this issue is just going to melt away.

4. Zombie health care bill. I have cautioned my colleagues for months not to declare this GOP effort dead, and I will repeat that advice again, even in the wake of this defeat on the Senate floor for Republicans. All it takes is one deal to flip McCain, Murkowski or Collins, and the GOP would be back in business. Remember, lots of people thought Speaker Ryan was wrong to keep pushing in the House, but then he suddenly found the votes for a bill that many thought was dead in early May. I wouldn’t write off that possibility in the Senate, especially if Republican Governors – like McCain’s in Arizona – get more involved in the process. All it takes is one vote, and it could be the Democrats looking glum. “We’re going to have to pick up the pieces and keep going,” said Sen. Ron Johnson (R-WI).

5. Can there be any real bipartisan deal making? There have been talks for some time among Senators who are former Governors and insurance commissioners in both parties – now we’ll see if those gain more traction in a bid to find common ground to do something on health care. Some like Sen. Joe Manchin (D-WV) have been talking about brokering a bipartisan deal for months – Manchin told reporters repeatedly that he didn’t think those efforts would have a chance until the GOP lost a vote in the Senate. Now we’ll see if anything changes on that front.

6. The demonstrators outside the Capitol. When I went out to grab some dinner around 7 pm, I was surprised at how few people were outside the Capitol; I had expected a larger crowd with the health bill ready to come to a vote. Well, the size of the crowd did grow in the hours after that, and when the GOP ‘skinny’ bill was defeated, you could hear the roars from outside echoing back into the halls of the Senate. Just as it was a defeat for Republicans, it was a victory for Democrats and progressive groups, which had worked hard to try to preserve the Obama health law. The House victory for Republicans on health care in early May had been a bitter setback for Democrats. This time, those opposed to GOP reform plans enjoyed the moment.

7. What was in the “skinny” GOP bill? If you went to bed at a reasonable hour on Thursday, you missed the two hour life span of the new GOP proposal, the “Health Care Freedom Act.” After complaining for seven years (in many ways incorrectly), that Democrats had abused the legislative process in the passage of the Obama health law, Senate Republicans made the Democrats look like pikers. The bill surfaced just after 10 pm, there was two hours of debate, and then a vote. In between, a report surfaced from the Congressional Budget Office. Yes, the bill was only 8 pages long, but it was a brand new proposal that had suddenly emerged, with little time to be evaluated. Don’t overlook these details – as I mentioned above, they could resurface at any time in the future.

Trump tweets: Senators ‘let the American people down’

Published: Friday, July 28, 2017 @ 2:49 AM

President Donald Trump.
Win McNamee/Getty Images
President Donald Trump.(Win McNamee/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump reacted swiftly on Twitter after the Senate rejected a measure to repeal parts of former President Barack Obama’s health care law, saying the senators who voted “no” early Friday morning “let the American people down.”

>> Read more trending news

Three Republican senators -- John McCain of Arizona, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska and Susan Collins of Maine -- voted with Democrats to defeat the measure.

“3 Republicans and 48 Democrats let the American people down. As I said from the beginning, let ObamaCare implode, then deal. Watch!” the president tweeted within an hour of the dramatic vote in the Senate.

Several Republicans, including Vice President Mike Pence, had animated conversations with McCain before the vote, CNN reported.

Majority Leader Mitch McConnell called the Senate rejection “clearly a disappointing moment.”

"It's time to move on," McConnell said.

Dayton traffic from the WHIO Traffic Center

Published: Friday, July 28, 2017 @ 2:41 AM
Updated: Friday, July 28, 2017 @ 2:41 AM

Check this page for a full list of crashes, disabled vehicles, construction projects and other hazards impacting your commute.

Traffic issues can be reported by calling our newsroom at 937-259-2237 or tweeting @WHIOTraffic .

Traffic conditions are updated every six minutes on AM 1290 and News 95.7 FM.

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Ongoing Construction & Other Closures 

Get a live look at highways on our traffic cameras here.

Latest traffic conditions are also available on our traffic map. 

MONTGOMERY COUNTY 

  • I-75 north between Main Street and Needmore Road, lane closure July 29th between the hours of 9 am and 2 pm. Two northbound lanes will remain open.
  • I-75 south ramp to US 35 west will be closed from January 9th to September 30th to replace a bridge deck beam that was not included in the I-75 modernization project. The official detour is: I-75 south to the Edwin C. Moses turn around lane to I-75 north to US 35 west.
  • I-75 north ramp the US 35 east will be closed March 28th to September 23rd. ODOT lists the suggested detour as NB I-75 to US 35 west, to James H McGee Blvd, to US 35 east. 
  • I-75 north/Stewart Street Ramp to US 35 East, ramp closure March 28th – September 23rd. The official detour is: Stewart Street to Edwin C. Moses Boulevard to I-75 north to US 35 west to James H McGee Blvd. to US 35 east
  • I-75 south Ramp to US 35 west, ramp closure January 9th – September 30th. The official detour is: I-75 south to the Edwin C. Moses turn around lane to I-75 north to US 35 west.
  • I-75 between I-70 and SR 571, Nightly lane closures July 24th – October 31st between the hours of 7 pm and 7 am. The northbound side will become double lane closure between 10 pm and 6 am. One lane will remain open in each direction. 
  • I-75 between Edwin C. Moses Boulevard and Main Street, nightly lane closures July 24th – 28th between the hours of 7 pm and 6 am. These will become double lane closures between 11 pm and 5 am. One lane will remain open in each direction.
  • I-70 between I-75 and SR 202, shoulder closure May 8th – September 12th. Both the inside and outside shoulders will be closed for road work. Road will be open.
  • I-70 between Preble County Line Road and South Kimmel Road, overnight lane closures June 12th – August 31st between 6 pm and 7 am. One lane will remain open in each direction.
  • US 35 west between Perry Street and Edwin C. Moses Boulevard, nightly lane closures July 26th – August 2nd between the hours of 8 pm and 6 am. One westbound lane will remain open.
  • US 35 west between Edwin C. Moses Boulevard and Jefferson Boulevard, traffic pattern switch July 6 – August 13.  Lanes will be moved to the inside portion of the interstate. Two lanes will be open in each direction.
  • SR 202 between Troy Villa Boulevard and Chesam Drive, traffic pattern shift May 15th – August 11th. All southbound traffic will be shifted to the northbound side of SR 202. There will be one southbound lane and one northbound lane operating on the northbound side of SR 202.
  • SR 48 between Siebenthaler Avenue and Shiloh Springs Road, Nightly lane closures June 26th – July 31st between 7 pm and 6 am. One lane will remain open in each direction.
  • SR 741 at Austin Boulevard, intermittent lane closures and construction work May 22 – August 25.  
  • SR 49 between SR 721 and US 40, lane closures June 12th – July 31st between 7 am and 7 pm. One lane will remain open in each direction through the use of flaggers.
  • Shroyer Road between Gainsborough Road and East Dorothy Lane will be repaved and reconfigured from June 9 through at least October. Once the project is completed, Shroyer Road will be reduced to three lanes. 
  • Ludlow Street Ramp to US 35 west, ramp closure May 12th – August 9th. The official detour is: Washington Street to US 35 west
  • Bridgewater Road between Taylorsville Road and US 40, bridge closure May 15th – September 12th. The official detour is: Bridgewater Road to Taylorsville Road to Rip Rap Road to Little York Road to Brown School Road to US 40
  • The Webster Street bridge is closed as it is rebuilt. A detour will take drivers to Keowee Street to Monument Avenue. The project is scheduled to be completed in November of 2017 

MIAMI COUNTY 

  • SR 185 near McMaken Road, road closure July 26th – August 1st. The official detour is: SR 48 south to US 36 east to SR 185 
  • Piqua-Troy Road between Statler Road and Eldean Road, bridge closure April 12th – October 12th. The official ODOT detour is: Piqua-Troy Road to West Peterson Road to CR 25A to Eldean Road to Piqua-Troy Road.
  • West Peterson Road East between Troy-Sidney Road and Piqua-Troy Road, road closure July 5th – August 19th. The official detour from ODOT is: Troy Sidney Road to Piqua Troy Rd to Eldean Rd to County Road 25A to Peterson Road.
  • Piqua-Troy Road between Statler Road and Eldean Road, road closure April 12th – October 12th. The official detour is: Piqua-Troy Road to West Peterson to CR 25A to Eldean Road to Piqua -Troy Road or Piqua-Troy Road to West Peterson to Troy-Sidney Road to Statler Road to Piqua-Troy Road
  • I-75 between CR 25A (Troy) and US 36, Shoulder closures April 11th – October 31st.

CLARK COUNTY  

  • US 68 north Ramp to US 40 east, ramp closure July 17th – August 30th. The official detour is: US 68 north to SR 41 to US 68 south to US 40 east
  • I-675 north over I-70, traffic pattern switch. The two lanes of northbound traffic are shifted to the southbound side just south of the overpass. Two northbound lanes will be open. * Once over the bridge, the right lane will be an exit only for I-675 north to I-70 west. The left north bound lane will be for thru traffic to Spangler Road. 
  • I-70 west near I-675, lane width restrictions April 5th – October 31st. The roadway will be restricted to 22’ in this area.
  • I-70 east Ramp to I-675 north, ramp closure April 19th – October 31st. The official detour is: I-675 to SR 444 to I-675 north.
  • SR 41 between Donnels Creek Lane and SR 235, lane closures July 5th – October 16th between 7 am and 5 pm. One lane will remain open in each direction.
  • SR 565 between SR 29 and Houston Pike, Daily lane closures May 22nd through September 30th between 7 am and 5 pm. One lane will remain open in each direction.

DARKE COUNTY 

  • SR 118 between SR 47 and the Mercer/Darke County line, daily lane closures June 16th – July 31st between the hours of 6 am and 6 pm. One lane will remain open for travel in each direction through the use of flaggers.
  • SR 121 between Arnold Street and Fairview Avenue, Daily lane closures April 24th – September 1st between 7 am and 5 pm. One lane will remain open in each direction.
  • US 127 between US 36 and Kruckeberg Road, Daily lane closures June 12th – August 25th between 7 am and 5 pm. One lane will remain open in each direction.

CHAMPAIGN COUNTY 

  • US 36 between SR 814 and McMahill Road, lane closures May 22nd through September 30th between 7 am and 5 pm. One lane will remain open in each direction.
  • US 36 between Bollinger Road and Edgewood Avenue, lane closures June 12th – August 31st between  7 am and 5 pm. One lane will remain open in each direction.
  • US 36 between SR 814 and Cambrian Road, lane closures July 5th – October 16th between 7 am and 5 pm. One lane will remain open in each direction.
  • SR 54 between SR 4 and Brigner Road, lane closures May 22nd through September 30th between 7 am and 5 pm. One lane will remain open in each direction.
  • SR 55 between Elm Tree Road and Edgewood Avenue, lane closures May 22nd through September 30th between 7 am and 5 pm. One lane will remain open in each direction.
  • SR 245 between SR 296 and Gilbert Road, lane closures July 5th – October 16th between 7 am and 5 pm. One lane will remain open in each direction.
  • SR 54 between Hickory Grove Road and Water Street, lane closures July 5th – October 16th between 7 am and 5 pm. One lane will remain open in each direction.
  • SR 296 between SR 29 and SR 814, lane closures May 22nd – September 30th between 7 am and 5 pm. One lane will remain open for travel in each direction through the use of flaggers.
SHELBY COUNTY 
  • SR 274 between SR 66 and SR 29, daily lane closures July 24th – August 25th between the hours of 7 am and 8 pm. One lane will remain open in each direction. 
  • SR 274 between I-75 and SR 65, daily lane closures July 24th – August 25th between the hours of 7 am and 8 pm. One lane will remain open in each direction. 
  • SR 29 near SR 274, daily lane closures July 24th – August 25th between the hours of 7 am and 8 pm. One lane will remain open in each direction.
  • SR 66 between Enterprise Drive and Greenback Road, road closure July 10th – October 13th. The official detour is: SR 185 to SR 48 to US 36 to SR 185
  • Amsterdam Road between CR 25A (Sidney) and Heiland Kies Road, road closure May 15th– August 15th. The official detour from ODOT is: Amsterdam Road to CR 25A to SR 274 to Heiland Kies Road to Amsterdam Road.