Where is the last fragment of NCR’s famed underground Dayton tunnel system?

Published: Friday, June 02, 2017 @ 6:00 AM

The last remaining part of NCR's tunnel system is in parking lot between The Cox Media Center and Marriott at the University of Dayton.
The last remaining part of NCR's tunnel system is in parking lot between The Cox Media Center and Marriott at the University of Dayton.

The last remnant of a hidden underground tunnel system that once connected one of Dayton’s most innovating companies is located just off a parking lot. 

>> PHOTOS: NCR over the years in Dayton

Brady Kress, Dayton history’s president and CEO, says what remains of NCR’s tunnel system is an unassuming doorway leading to a small space off a parking lot near Marriott at the University of Dayton and Cox Media Center located in the area of Main Street and River Park Drive. 

>> WATCH: Remember when this Dayton building was blown up?

For all practical purposes, the door leads to nowhere. It once lead to much more. 

Here is how a Dayton History Book Online describes the tunnel system: 

  No doubt if you worked at NCR in Dayton or visited the campus, you were aware of the tunnel system running from building to building connecting the basement of each building with the basement of the next. There were nine main tunnels spanning nearly one half mile in length. The average tunnel was 8 feet high and 8 feet wide. The electric trucks which were purchased for movement of materials outside the buildings and that were such a labor saver were just too large to be efficiently used in the tunnels.                                                                                    

The last remaining part of NCR's tunnel system is in parking lot between The Cox Media Center and Marriott at the University of Dayton.

Dayton History at Carillon Park, 1000 Carillon Blvd., Dayton, has a display about the tunnel system, which was used to get materials and workers between buildings. 

The display includes two gray tunnel doors that were once near NCR’s famed building 26.  

>> Hope that Dayton engineer will get recognized for code-breaking

Founded by Dayton luminary John Patterson, NCR left Dayton in 2009 for suburban Atlanta. 

Over the years, the tunnel system has been collapsed during University of Dayton construction projects, Kress said.  

>> NCR makes donation valued at $3 million to Dayton organization

Dayton History salvaged a set of doors from NCR's tunnel near building 26.

>> Which Dayton building was called the ‘Grecian lady’?

The last remaining part of NCR's tunnel system is in parking lot between The Cox Media Center and

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10 popular hip-hop songs that sample Dayton funk music

Published: Monday, August 14, 2017 @ 6:00 AM

Dayton is considered the Land of Funk. Here is why. Video by Amelia Robinson

Dayton may not be the birthplace of hip hop, but we sure helped make it funky.

Google celebrated the 44th anniversary of the hip hop movement on Aug. 11, 2017. 

To put it funky, hip hop would be a lot more square without samples from the Land of Funk thanks to the Ohio Players, Steve Arrington’s Hall of Fame, Zapp, Faze-O, Heatwave, Sun, Slave and Lakeside. 

Salt N Pepa play the Ford stage during Sunfest in downtown West Palm Beach on April 30, 2016. (Richard Graulich / The Palm Beach Post)(Richard Graulich)

In the 1970s and 1980s, southwestern Ohio -- particularly Dayton’s west side -- was known for its stable of funk bands whose influence can be heard in hip-hop, house and other musical forms popular today through sampling, covers and remixes. 

>> 8 Dayton acts you should give a funk about

The Ohio Players -- the granddaddies of 'em all -- have seen their songs sampled or remade by Snoop Dogg, Puff Daddy, and Salt-N-Pepa, as well as as list of rockers that include Soundgarden and the Red Hot Chili Peppers.
Here are just ten hip hop songs (there are literally hundreds of them) and the Dayton funk songs they sampled, according the database WhoSampled.com.

Please be aware that some songs contain explicit lyrics.  

1) and 2)  FAZE-O’S “Riding High

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So you wanna be a figure skater? Start your Olympic dreams here

Published: Monday, February 19, 2018 @ 6:00 AM

Maia Shibutani and Alex Shibutani of the United States perform their ice dance free dance routine as part of the team figure skating competition of the 2018 Winter Olympics at the Gangneung Ice Arena in Gangneung, South Korea, on Monday, Feb. 12, 2018. The U.S. took the bronze medal in the team figure skating event Monday. (Chang W. Lee/The New York Times)
CHANG W. LEE
Maia Shibutani and Alex Shibutani of the United States perform their ice dance free dance routine as part of the team figure skating competition of the 2018 Winter Olympics at the Gangneung Ice Arena in Gangneung, South Korea, on Monday, Feb. 12, 2018. The U.S. took the bronze medal in the team figure skating event Monday. (Chang W. Lee/The New York Times)(CHANG W. LEE)

Hagerstown, Tokyo, Beavercreek – as long as there was an ice rink nearby, it was home sweet home for Cindi Sonntag.

“Physically, it’s helped me build muscle – core muscle and leg muscle – but it’s more than that,” Sonntag said. “When I skate, I feel joy.”

With the Olympics underway, the grace and beauty of the sport is on display almost nightly. But while Olympic gold is a rare commodity, figure skating can be enjoyed by all ages – even without the sequins and commentators.

“In Olympic years we get what we call an Olympic bounce,” said Angie Riviello, arena and aquatics manager at the Kettering Recreation Complex. “People see the incredible athletes and it’s so beautiful to watch, you just get inspired.”

That inspiration has no age limits.

“You’re never too old to start,” Riviello said. “We have a lot of adults who come out and want to take lessons so they can skate with their kids or grandkids at open skates.”

Sonntag can vouch for the fact that you’re never too old as she was in her 40s, living in Maryland, when she got started skating. Now, at 56, the mother of four, who also called Tokyo home, is skating competitively and training for the adult nationals.

>> How you can get involved in this icy Olympic sport right here

Crystal Ramsey of Springfield skates at Kettering Ice Arena. CONTRIBUTED(Contributing Writer)

GOOD FOR THE MIND

“When I started skating, I realized that I could not worry about things and skate at the same time, I had to turn off that part of my brain,” Sonntag said. “That means when I skate I have these moments when everything is right and that’s a wonderful feeling.”

And while Sonntag is in her mid-50s, she is still, often times, a youngster on the ice. Riviello regularly sees skaters well into their 70s taking lessons.

“The first thing we focus on is safety because a lot of adults are nervous that if they fall, they will break something,” Riviello said. “So, one of the first things we do is teach them how to fall and how to get back out and that helps put their mind at ease.”

Sonntag has seen skaters in their 80s lace up their skates.

“You can learn new things at any age,” she said. “And this is something I can do when I’m ‘old,’” she added with a smile.

>> 3 local athletes you should know who competed in the Winter Olympics

Cindi Sonntag of Beavercreek and partner Leo Kaplun, originally from Russia, medaled in pairs and ice dancing at the 2016 nationals in Michigan. CONTRIBUTED(Contributing Writer)

GOOD FOR THE BODY

Beyond the mental health aspects of the sport, skating has several physical benefits.

“Skating is a great workout for the core, and it’s a great workout for legs,” Riviello said. “It’s also wonderful for improving balance and creating body awareness.”

The cardio and stamina benefits should not be overlooked and some adult skaters enjoy just tallying laps – 10 laps at the Kettering Ice Arena equal a mile. And skaters can burn 200 calories an hour on the ice.

“It really is great exercise and you can take it as far as you want to take it,” Riviello said.

From the beginner class to advanced jumps and spins, the Learn to Skate USA curriculum offers a safe and steady progression. There are also opportunities to perform with local skating groups and compete – like Sonntag.

“I’m not going to be a double jumper but that’s ok,” she said. “Getting out and moving just makes me feel better.”

>> What you need to know about skating at Riverscape

Cindi Sonntag of Beavercreek and partner Leo Kaplun, originally from Russia, medaled in pairs and ice dancing at the 2016 nationals in Michigan. CONTRIBUTED(Contributing Writer)

TRY SKATING – LEARN MORE

Kettering Ice Arena

WHERE: 2900 Glengarry Drive, Kettering

WHAT: Youth and adult lessons, open skating, hockey

INFO: https://www.playkettering.org/

South Metro Sports

WHERE: 10561 Success Lane, Centerville

WHAT: Youth and adult lessons, open skating, hockey, South Dayton Figure Skating Club,

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One of the hottest new fitness locations — and why it has a waiting list

Published: Friday, November 24, 2017 @ 6:00 AM
Updated: Friday, February 23, 2018 @ 3:38 PM

CycleBar, which recently opened its doors at Austin Landing, is a franchised indoor cycling studio with more than 100 locations worldwide. Classes are designed to provide a high intensity, low impact, cardio workout for riders 13 and older of all experience and fitness levels. CONTRIBUTED
Contributing Writer
CycleBar, which recently opened its doors at Austin Landing, is a franchised indoor cycling studio with more than 100 locations worldwide. Classes are designed to provide a high intensity, low impact, cardio workout for riders 13 and older of all experience and fitness levels. CONTRIBUTED(Contributing Writer)

There is heart-pumping music and state-of-the-art audio, video and lighting, but it’s not the hottest new club – it’s CycleBar.

CycleBar, which recently opened its doors at Austin Landing, is a franchised indoor cycling studio with more than 100 locations worldwide. Classes are designed to provide a high-intensity, low-impact cardio workout for riders 13 and older of all experience and fitness levels.

“Our goal is to have 50 minutes go by so fast that you don’t realize you burned 600 calories because you’re having such a good time,” said Steve Zubrzycki, who owns the local CycleBar with his wife, Jane.

If the packed CycleTheatere is any indication, Zubrzycki is right on track. Since the facility opened in late October, classes have not only been full, wait lists are common.

“I love that every class has the same basis, but each individual instructor makes their rides completely different,” said Haylie Stites, of West Carrollton. “The atmosphere is one of a kind.”

TAKE A SPIN

The Austin Landing location has 48 bikes, arranged in a multi-tier stadium formation. Rides are choreographed to heart-pumping playlists, complete with expansive video screens, to provide a concert-like experience for your workout.

It couldn’t be much easier to get riding as CycleBar provides shoes that clip into the pedals, along with complimentary water bottles and snacks. The bikes are compatible with SPD and LOOK shoes for those who prefer to bring their own shoes. Lockers with coded keypads are available to store personal belongings and locker rooms are stocked with robes, hair ties, wet clothing bags, and other toiletries.

“We try to provide all the amenities anyone would need,” Zubrzycki said.

>> How to make the most of Dayton’s new indoor bike park

CycleBar, which recently opened its doors at Austin Landing, is a franchised indoor cycling studio with more than 100 locations worldwide. Classes are designed to provide a high intensity, low impact, cardio workout for riders 13 and older of all experience and fitness levels. CONTRIBUTED(Contributing Writer)

NO EXCUSES

Plentiful amenities eliminate some of the exercise excuses and a full slate of classes, offered seven days a week, eliminate several others. CycleBar offers 30 classes a week with some beginning as early as 5:30 a.m. on weekdays and as late as 7 p.m. Most classes are 50 minutes long, with some lunchtime rides wrapping up in 30 minutes, for those who need to get back to the office.

And while spinning has a high-intensity reputation, Zubrzycki – who rides at least four times a week himself – explains that classes are available for all types of riders.

“We have seven instructors, all with different personalities, so people seem to gravitate toward certain instructors after a few classes,” he said. “And, while classes can be intense, I always suggest that riders go at their pace.”

>> 10 things to know about the new cinema at Austin Landing

BY THE NUMBERS

And data-driven cyclists will be right at home at CycleBar.

“I love that everything you do during your ride is recorded and automatically emailed to you, and posted to your private account online so I can compare my past sessions,” Stites said. “It tells you your average miles-per-hour, rpm, heart rate – if you have a monitor – speed, time you spent riding, class rank, distance and calories burned.”

CycleStats measure the six key metrics of daily workouts and keep historical performance data. The data is emailed to riders and CycleStats are also available at cyclebar.com.

CHECK OUT CYCLEBAR

Where: Austin Landing, 3655 Rigby Road

Online: https://austinlanding.cyclebar.com/

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6 house upgrades to do now for a better listing price later

Published: Friday, February 16, 2018 @ 2:08 PM

Be sure to avoid these 6 common mistakes that first-time home buyers often make Not getting a professional inspection Not putting a pause button on purchases Not keeping up with correspondence Not understanding the hidden costs of buying a home Not working with a buyer's agent Not looking into loan assistance programs

Whether you want to flip your house in a few months or you just want to use your remodel money wisely, the most beneficial home upgrades are not a matter of chance.

»RELATED: These 7 paint colors will increase your home’s value

And they "aren't particularly sexy," according to Bank Rate's Holden Lewis. 

Except for a minor kitchen remodel, according to Remodeling magazine's 2018 Cost vs. Value Report, you'll gain the highest returns from getting work done on the exterior of the house (hello, garage door!), not interior renovations of the sort that you can enjoy yourself (goodbye, dream rec room).

Developing the discipline to put your budget into the remodeling projects that deliver the highest return, instead of, say, your dream outdoor kitchen or super-size MIL quarters, will pay off when you sell, Remodeling said.

The magazine compared the average cost of 21 popular remodeling projects completed by pros in 149 metropolitan areas. Then it surveyed real estate pros in 100 markets to find out how much each project would increase a home's resale value a year after each project was completed. (Note that none of the projects actually added value to the final sales price of a home. Instead, they were the projects that paid back the highest amount of the initial investment, either in actual dollars or percentages).

The projects that yielded the most bang for the buck from Remodeling's findings included these top six, based on national average:

1. Garage door replacement

Job cost: $3,470

Value added: $3,411

Cost recouped: 98.3 percent

2. Manufactured stone veneer

Job cost: $8,221

Value added: $7,986

Cost recouped: 97.1 percent

3. Wood deck addition

Job cost: $10,950

Value added: $9,065

Cost recouped: 82.8 percent

4. Minor kitchen remodel

Job cost: $21,198

Value added: $17,193

Cost recouped: 81.1 percent

5. Siding replacement

Job cost: $15,072

Value added: $11,554

Cost recouped: 76.7 percent

6. Window replacement, vinyl

Job cost: $15,955

Value added: $11,855

Cost recouped: 74.3 percent

The most sensible indoor remodel project after the minor kitchen remodel was a Universal Design bathroom, which Remodeling concluded would cost about $16,393 and add about $11,581 in value, for 70.6 percent.

For 2018 and on into future years, Remodeling expected a continued gain in costs for remodeling projects, like the 3- to 5-percent increase in costs experienced in 2017. "Fall hurricanes and fires began fueling what one building products distributor calls 'a freight train of extraordinary demand' — demand certain to keep elevating the prices for many building materials," noted the publication. "Expect, as well, an even greater shortage of skilled workers in disaster-struck markets as those workers struggle to fix up their own homes and employers feel pressure to respond with pay hikes."

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