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Website seeks Pilgrim descendants to post their stories

Published: Thursday, November 23, 2017 @ 1:41 PM

PLYMOUTH, MA - NOVEMBER 20: A boy dressed as a pilgrim rides on a float during the annual Thanksgiving Parade November 20, 2004 in Plymouth, Massachusetts.
Michael Springer/Getty Images
PLYMOUTH, MA - NOVEMBER 20: A boy dressed as a pilgrim rides on a float during the annual Thanksgiving Parade November 20, 2004 in Plymouth, Massachusetts.(Michael Springer/Getty Images)

A genealogical organization in New England has announced the launch of the world's first online gallery of Mayflower passenger descendants.

The New England Historic Genealogical Society told The Associated Press that the goal is to document the approximately 30 million living descendants of Mayflower passengers and crew.

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The website identifies 108 passengers and crew members known to have left descendants, allowing participants to locate their Pilgrim relative. Those who are a known descendant of a Pilgrim can post their story on the website.

The new project will help mark the 400th anniversary of the Mayflower's passage, which takes place in 2020, The Associated Press reported.

MORE: Native Americans mark Thanksgiving with day of mourning

The Associated Press contributed to this report

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Americans binge 17 billion drinks a year, CDC estimates

Published: Sunday, March 18, 2018 @ 7:44 AM

Parents Dining With Kids Limited To One Alcoholic Beverage At NY Restaurant

College students have a reputation for binge drinking, but it’s not just them. Americans drink massive amounts of alcoholic beverages, according to a new report

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Researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention conducted a study, published in the American Journal of Preventative Medicine, to determine how much booze United States citizens down. 

To do so, they examined information from the CDC’s 2015 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, which included self-reported data on individuals’ liquor consumption habits over 30 days. They calculated the annual binge drinking by “multiplying the estimated total number of binge drinking episodes among binge drinkers by the average largest number of drinks consumed per episode,” the authors wrote. 

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After analyzing the results, they found the Americans guzzled 17 billion drinks in 2015. That equals 470 total binge drinks per binge drinker.

“This study shows that binge drinkers are consuming a huge number of drinks per year, greatly increasing their chances of harming themselves and others,” co-author Robert Brewer said in a statement.

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The prevalence of binge drinking was more common among young adults ages 18-34, but more than half of the binge drinks consumed annually were by adults 35 and older.

Furthermore, about 80 percent of the drinks were consumed by men. And those who made less than $25,000 a year and had educational levels less than high school drank “substantially more” a year than those with higher incomes and educational levels. 

The researchers said the results “show the importance of taking a comprehensive approach to prevent binge drinking, focusing on reducing both the number of times people binge drink and the amount they drink when they binge.”

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With their findings, the researchers hope to implement prevention tactics such as reducing the number of alcohol outlets in a geographic area and limiting the days and hours of sale.

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Woman buys $600 worth of Girl Scout cookies, has Scouts give them out free to strangers

Published: Sunday, March 18, 2018 @ 1:56 AM

The History of Girl Scouts

A Seattle Girl Scout troop is ending the cookie season on a sweet note.

KIRO-TV's Siemny Kim shows us how their cookies inspired strangers to pay it forward.

The annual cookie sale gives Girl Scouts a lesson in business.

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For this troop, it's also given them a lesson in kindness.

“At first, I was really surprised. I didn’t know what to do,” Girl Scout Norah Wall said. 

Norah Wall and Ruthie Bridgman had set up outside of a Grocery Outlet store in Seattle's Madrona neighborhood when a good Samaritan approached their booth.

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“I remember this lady coming up and she was like, ‘Hey, if I buy all these cookies, will you hand them out to everyone that comes out of the store?’” Ruthie said. “And we were like, ‘Yeah, I guess.’”

The woman spent more than $600.

Norah and Ruthie even had a hard time giving the cookies away.

“Some people just didn't believe that somebody would actually do that,” Norah said. 

Incredibly, that random act of kindness didn't end there.

It made its way inside the Grocery Outlet, where Cami Nearhoff is a cashier.

“We had a lady in my line – people in front, people in back – and she bought all of their groceries,” Nearhoff said.

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Nearhoff said people paid it forward all day.

“All day it just seemed like people were doing little things. So I think it kind of inspired people to give back to each other. Whether it was a dollar, someone was short 6 cents – all day long it was happening. It was just crazy. Really crazy day,” Nearhoff said.

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This troop is excited knowing their cookies could inspire such kindness. 

“I think it's really cool, and it made me so happy that I was able to be a part of this,” Ruthie said.

The troop is raising money to attend Girl Scout camp this year.

If you're still looking for the sweet treats, you'd better hurry. Sunday is the last day of cookie sales.

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Florida man going blind sees beach for last time

Published: Saturday, March 17, 2018 @ 1:47 PM

A Florida man who is going blind got to see the beach for the last time.
A Florida man who is going blind got to see the beach for the last time.(

Woody Parker and his wife, Genie, arrived at Fernandina Beach in style.

Woody has glaucoma, an eye disease that causes blindness, and he’s on the verge of losing the sight he has left.

Wish of a Lifetime and Brookdale Senior Living decided to help make Woody’s dream come true before he goes blind, ActionNewsJax reported.

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He wanted to see the beach with his wife one last time.

“I love it. I love the beach,” Woody said.

He and his wife made their way down closer to the water.

“There’s nothing like the sound of the beach with the waves crashing,” said Woody.

“Always special to be anywhere with him, especially here. We enjoy it,” Genie said.

Hand in hand, they relaxed on the beach.

“It’s just real cozy. There’s just something about it that’s just different,” Woody told ActionNewsJax.

Woody says even though he may lose his sight, it won’t stop him from coming to the beach if he has another chance.

“Of course, I won’t be able to see the changes, but I’ll be able to feel them,” he said.

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Couple married 72 years die 10 hours apart

Published: Saturday, March 17, 2018 @ 3:28 PM

A stock image of wedding rings.
Rodrigo Valladares/Freeimages
A stock image of wedding rings.(Rodrigo Valladares/Freeimages)

Malcolm and Betty Clynch never did anything apart, their family said. That proved to be true even in death.

The Texas couple married in 1945 when they were teenagers, WFAA reported. But soon the newlyweds were separated for the only time in their lives, while Malcolm served in the Army. Love letters shared by the family illustrate the couple's deep love and devotion to one another. Malcolm signed each love letter with: "I'll always love only you."

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That love continued for the rest of their lives, as they raised a family and had long careers. After 72 years of marriage, Malcolm and Betty, both 90, were in failing health. Betty had Alzheimer's disease and Malcolm had heart issues, the family told WFAA.

The family believes that Malcolm felt like he had to die first, to show Betty the way. Malcolm did die first, at a Fort Worth assisted living facility. Betty followed him in death just 10 hours later, family told WFAA.

The family held a double funeral for the couple on Monday.

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