This Dayton movie star left us wanting more with her award season looks 

Published: Monday, March 05, 2018 @ 4:09 PM

Oakwood-raised actress Allison Janney shined this award season. Video by Amelia Robinson

When Allison Janney slays, she slays all day. 

The Oakwood-raised star of stage and screen left us wanting more with each of her award season looks. 

>> Oakwood actress Allison Janney wins first Oscar — and possibly the Internet 

The bright red, plunging v-neck Reem Acra gown Janney wore to collect her best supporting Oscar dropped all the jaws on Sunday. 

Add to that all that shine. 

People magazine says the star of CBS’ “Mom” wore more than 128 carats worth of Forevermark jewelry valued at more than $4 million. 

>> Allison Janney: “Dayton spawns great people”

The former Miami Valley School student is the first Daytonian to win an Oscar in a major acting category. Janney is a recent Dayton Walk of Fame inductee.

>> What Macy Janney had to say about her daughter’s big night

As we predicted, she racked up award after award this award season -- and she did it looking great and being adorable. 

We have the gifs to prove it. 



>>MORE: This famous actor was named ‘class flirt’ at a local high school and was up for an Oscar 




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Cardi B says female hip-hop artists have been excluded from the #MeToo movement

Published: Thursday, March 22, 2018 @ 5:48 PM

Cardi B says the #MeToo movement excludes women in hip-hop In an interview with Cosmopolitan, Cardi B said that the movement hasn't fully reached the music industry yet and that women in hip-hop are overlooked. Cardi B, to Cosmopolitan Cardi B, to Cosmopolitan Cardi B, to Cosmopolitan She then went on to call out the high-profile men who support the movement, saying "they’re not woke, they’re scared." Tell it how it is, Cardi.


Several women in Hollywood continue to come forward with stories of sexual misconduct against powerful men in the entertainment world following reports of Harvey Weinstein alleged abuses in October 2017. Most recently, Jennifer Lopez told Harper’s Bazaar about a shocking incident where a director commanded her to “take off her shirt and show her (breasts).” (Although she was terrified, she did not comply and got out of the situation unscathed. But not all female entertainers in the music industry think the landscape is ripe for them to speak up. Chart-topping rapper Cardi B says that women like herself in Hip-Hop don’t have the same space or freedom to share stories about the sexual harassment they’ve endured. 

»RELATED: Cardi B is pregnant, report says    

“A lot of video vixens have spoke about this and nobody gives a (expletive)” she told Cosmopolitan about women in hip-hop music videos. “...I bet if one of these women stands up and talks about it, people are going to say, ‘So what? ... It don’t matter.’” 


The “Bodak Yellow” rapper also took aim at men who’ve publicly declared their support for the #MeToo movement, indicating she’s skeptical of their allegiance to the cause. “These producers and directors,” she said. “They’re not woke, they’re scared.”


During the revealing interview, the former exotic dancer also took a stand for strippers. Cardi B, who famously resorted to stripping before her career took off to escape an abusive relationship, addressed why she continues to highlight her pole-dancing days: “People say, ‘Why do you always got to say that you used to be a stripper? We get it.’ Because y’all don’t respect me because of it, and y’all going to respect these strippers from now on,” she told the glossy. “Just because somebody was a stripper don’t mean they don’t have no brain.”


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Cat reunited with owner 14 years after hurricane disappearance

Published: Wednesday, March 21, 2018 @ 8:34 AM

Cat Missing for 14 Years Reunited With Owner

Perry Martin probably can’t stop pondering about his cat.

>> See the Facebook post here

T2 was reunited with his dad after being missing for 14 YEARS! He went missing in 2004 for during hurricane season and...

Posted by Humane Society of the Treasure Coast on Tuesday, March 13, 2018

In 2004, the orange tabby Thomas 2, or simply just “T2,” disappeared.

It happened when the Fort Pierce man moved into a friend’s house in Stuart after Hurricane Jeanne stormed through the area, according to TCPalm.

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The retired K-9 officer grieved, but then came to terms with the idea that his cat had moved on to other ventures, or to that great catnap in the sky. 

That all changed on March 9 with a phone call.

“Someone said, 'What if we told you T2 was alive?' I figured it was a mistake," Martin told TCPalm. "It was too crazy to believe."

>> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news 

Worn and weary, the fiery feline was found wandering the streets of Palm City.

He was brought into the shelter, where a scan of his skinny shoulder detected a microchip, which eventually led him back to Martin. 

Next thing you know, the tabby, now 18 years old, is back snuggling on his owner’s lap

>> Read more trending news 

The cat is content, but Martin’s questioning persists.

"Could you imagine if he could talk for just 15 minutes to tell us what he's been through?" Martin told TCPalm. "He'd probably say, 'Why did you keep the door shut, Dad?'"

Read more at TCPalm.

Study Says Your Cat Really Does Like You

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This local artist's work helps families through grief and loss. Now you can read her book.

Published: Wednesday, March 21, 2018 @ 6:00 AM


Patricia Acker of Xenia has worn many hats over the years. 

At times, she was a T-ball coach. Or a PTA president, while attending graduate school at Wright State. She’s been a foster mother a few times. And most of the time, she was helping to comfort people as they passed away.

>> Meet the ‘Plante’ lady who has kept the MetroParks beautiful for 15 years

For 17 years, Acker worked as a hospice social worker in Dayton, helping families through the difficult process of losing a loved one, as well as assisting the person who is dying. Acker is now retired and has since compiled her experiences and wisdom about death into a book of short stories titled “The Dying Teach Us How to Live.” 

>> Where to eat Easter brunch and dinner in Dayton

Watching as a lifetime of wrinkles seem to leave the face of a person who finally lets go is an example of the firsthand accounts that could only be told by a dedicated hospice worker. Hospice is a type of care -- and even philosophy -- that focuses on relieving the symptoms of the terminally ill while also attending to their emotional and spiritual needs. 

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(Sarah Franks)

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The book is illustrated with portraits created by Acker. As gifts for many of her patients’ families in hospice care, Acker would put on her artist’s hat and create an often emotional portrait for the family to take with them after their loved one died. 

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It’s hard to pinpoint the self-taught artist’s style, as each piece’s method depends on what Acker wants to explore that day. Her most recent muse is oil on mirror— strategically wiping oil away in certain areas to let light shine through the portraits. 

When asked what inspires her before she begins each portrait, her only response is “love,” in a voice that’s more gentle than a whisper. 

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(Sarah Franks)


As a young woman, Acker experienced loss and grief and found nowhere to turn for emotional and grief support, according to her website. She wanted others to have healing and grief options so chose Hospice as her life's work. 

“Because of death, it gives significance to life. None of us know when it’s going to happen, but it’s not a bad thing,” Acker said.

Countless encounters with death have made Acker unafraid of whatever comes after this life, she said.  

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“We’re all going to die sometime and we don’t know when that is,” Acker said. “So why not make a difference in the world while we’re here? ... There’s lots of opportunities in our life, and we have many choices to make. It’s because of death that we have to think carefully about those choices.”

Acker’s work will be on display in downtown Dayton at the Fifth Third Center Gallery, 1 S. Main St., in the grand lobby from April 2 to April 30 during regular bank hours. 

Every Friday from 11 a.m.-1 p.m., you can meet the artist, get autographs, purchase prints and buy your copy of “The Dying Teach Us How To Live.” The book is also available for $20 plus tax on Amazon and at

Want to go?

WHAT: Patricia Acker Exhibit

WHEN: April 2-30, during regular bank hours; every Friday from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. you can meet the artist. 

ARTIST RECEPTION: Artist reception and book signing held from 7-8:30 p.m. April 17.

WHERE: Fifth Third Center Gallery, 1 S. Main St., Dayton

INFO: Amazon |

(Sarah Franks)

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Why is it called Good Friday and what’s so good about it?

Published: Tuesday, March 20, 2018 @ 10:50 PM
Updated: Tuesday, March 20, 2018 @ 10:50 PM

Pictured is a mosaic of Jesus Christ inside Messina Cathedral on the Piazza del Duomo in Messina, Sicily.
Eye Ubiquitous/UIG via Getty Images
Pictured is a mosaic of Jesus Christ inside Messina Cathedral on the Piazza del Duomo in Messina, Sicily.(Eye Ubiquitous/UIG via Getty Images)

Christians believe Jesus was mocked publicly and crucified on a solemn Friday more than two thousand years ago. Today, the calamitous day is celebrated as Good Friday.

But what’s so good about that?

>> Read more trending news

One answer is that at the time of Jesus’ crucifixion, “good” may have referred to “holy” in Old English, a linguistic theory supported by many language experts.

According to Slate, the Oxford English Dictionary notes the Wednesday before Easter was once called “Good Wednesday.” Today, it’s more commonly known as Holy Wednesday.

And Anatoly Liberman, a University of Minnesota professor who studies the origins of English words, told Slate if we consider the alternative names for Good Friday, such as “Sacred Friday” (romance languages) or “Passion Friday” (Russian), this theory makes a lot of sense.

Another possible reason for its moniker — a theory supported by both linguists and historical evidence — refers to the holiday’s ties to Easter Sunday, which celebrates the resurrection of Christ.

Because Jesus couldn’t have been resurrected without dying, the day of his death is, in a sense, “good.”

“That terrible Friday has been called Good Friday because it led to the Resurrection of Jesus and his victory over death and sin and the celebration of Easter, the very pinnacle of Christian celebrations,” the Huffington Post reported.

A third answer, some believe, is that the “good” in Good Friday was derived from "God” or “God’s Friday” — the way the term “goodbye” comes from a contraction of the phrase “God Be With You.”

Fun Facts About Easter

Still, not everyone refers to this day as Good Friday. For example, 

The Catholic Encyclopedia mentions that, in the Greek Church, the holiday is known as "the Holy and Great Friday." In German, it's referred to as "Sorrowful Friday."

And as aforementioned, “Sacred Friday” and “Passion Friday” are also used.

In addition, because the holiday is also commemorated with a long fast, Good Friday was also referred to as “Long Friday” by the Anglo-Saxons.

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