5 things to know about Mike Turner’s soon-to-be ex-wife Majida Mourad Turner

Published: Friday, May 19, 2017 @ 5:07 PM

Dayton area Congressman Mike Turner and Majida Mourad were married on Dec. 19 at Westminster Presbyterian Church in downtown Dayton. Photo by Cydney Hatch with Afton Photography

It seems love did not last long for Congressman Mike Turner and his second wife.  

Married less than two years, the former Dayton mayor has filed for divorce from Majida Mourad Turner.

>> MORE: Dayton Congressman Mike Turner files for divorce

Turner and his former wife Lori Turner have two daughters, Jessica and Carolyn.  They divorced in 2013.

Mike and Majida Turner were married during a private ceremony on Dec. 19, 2015, at Westminster Presbyterian Church in downtown Dayton.

 

Here are 5 facts about Majida Turner you may not know. 

She’s a beauty

The Toledo native was named one of the 50 Most Beautiful People on Capitol Hill in 2015.

The “proud Ohioan” eschews traditional workouts at the gym for activities that keep her out and about, such as bike riding.

“I don’t like to feel like I have to work out,” she explains. “I like to just go out and be active.”

She has a background in politics and government

Majida was a member of President George W. Bush’s transition team staff and was aide to former U.S. Rep. Sonny Bono, R-Calif., and then his wife former U.S. Rep. Mary Bono, according to the Columbus Dispatch. 

From 2001 to 2005, she was a senior advisor for the U.S. Department of Energy. In that role she focused on the United States Department of Energy international relations in the Middle East, Australia, Russia and a host of European and Asian countries, her United States Energy Association bio says. 

She had a long resume

Majida  is  vice president government affairs at Tellurian Inc. (The Abraham Group), according to her Linkedin page. 

She was  vice president of government relations at Cheniere Energy Inc.  when she married Turner.  That role is still listed as current on her Linkedin page. 

She is listed as an honorary board member of The American Foundation for Saint George Hospital in McLean, Va. 

Salad and Diet Coke are her things

Majida told the Hill that she is really into family — and her lifelines are “salad and Diet Coke.” 

>> MORE:  What you need to know about Mike Turner’s bride-to-be

She was on Turner’s arm

Majida was her congressman husband's date at community events like the Dayton Art Institute’s annual Art Ball. 

Kitten rescued after getting stuck on the Golden Gate Bridge

Published: Tuesday, June 27, 2017 @ 5:10 PM

Officer Smith with Bridges the kitten.
CHP - Marin

If cats have nine lives, how many lives do kittens have?

An orange and white kitten is very fortunate to be alive after dodging traffic on the Golden Gate Bridge last weekend.

>> Read more trending news

California Highway Patrol received a call Sunday about a kitten running loose on the Golden Gate Bridge, according to the report on its Facebook page. Officers took one pass over the bridge and were unable to find the kitten; on a second pass, officers noticed a furry head popping out of a movable median barrier and blocked traffic to conduct a rescue operation.

The kitten was quickly freed and transported to an animal hospital for an exam and bath. The kitten had no collar or microchip, so it is unknown if he has an owner.

While a search for an owner continues, Officer Smith, one of the kitten's rescuers, offered to foster him.

The kitten has been tentatively named Bridges.

Some call Costco’s new burger ‘Shake Shack copycat’

Published: Tuesday, June 27, 2017 @ 4:35 PM

LOS ANGELES, CA - MARCH 12: A Costco sign is displayed on March 12, 2013 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)

Some Costco locations are serving up a new burger -- and it’s causing chatter beyond the food court. 

>> Read more trending news

Observations of the new burger have circulated for weeks, and it’s making headlines because food critics are comparing it to a Shake Shack burger.

Shake Shack, a popular chain that hasn’t made it to the northwest U.S., builds its burger with all-natural Angus beef, a “Chicago-style” potato bun, the Shack's sauce, which is made up of mayo, dijon mustard and dill pickle brine.

>> Related: Dick's Drive-In makes ‘25 Best Cheeseburgers' national list

“The final product looks nearly identical to Shack's beloved burger, though the ingredients are slightly different,” wrote Delish.com's Rheanna O’Neil Bellomo, who simply called it a “Shake Shack copycat.”

Ingredients in the 1/3 pound Costco burger are reported to be an organic beef patty, topped with romaine lettuce, and smoke Thousand Island dressing.

>> Related: This essay about Costco got a high school senior into 5 Ivy League schools

When the Seattle Times checked in with Costco Corporate about Seattle as a test market, it wouldn’t confirm the cheeseburger. But a reporter found one for sale at the Costco location in SoDo, costing a modest $4.99 and not-so-modest 1,140 calories.

According to Eater, the burger is in a localized testing phase.

Small town won't burst Fourth of July fireworks to protect bald eaglet

Published: Tuesday, June 27, 2017 @ 4:08 PM

File photo of a bald eagle  feeding its eaglet
Takayuki Maekawa/Getty Images

The Fourth of July is quickly approaching, and Americans are getting ready to host family and friends in celebration of the country’s independence.

But one town is asking its residents to rethink their participation in the popular explosive tradition.

Authorities in Columbia, a small Connecticut town, are concerned about the welfare of a bald eagle family, The Associated Press reported.

RELATED: Reeling in a camera from the Tennessee River revealed hundreds of photos and led to a remarkable meeting between strangers

A pair of eagles moved to the town last summer, and a female eaglet hatched only a few months ago. The eaglet has not yet developed the ability to fly. Seeing as its nest is 100 feet off the ground, wildlife biologist Brian Hess, who works for the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP), is concerned that fireworks might scare the eaglet from its nest.

“Eagles and fireworks are both sort of this great American tradition,” Hess added. “But I can’t think of a more perfectly startling thing than a firework.”

Town administrator Mark Walter announced that an official display was not planned. Residents have been threatened with fines and jail time should any fireworks harm the nest. Walter said  DEEP would be “available for dispatch if needed.”

“The resident trooper will be the enforcement agency to make any finds concerning illegal fireworks,” he said.

“I would not be happy if something happens to that eaglet,” said 28-year resident Janice Thibodeau. Though she said her neighbors have already purchased thousands of dollars in fireworks as they do every year, she suggested that they wait until Labor Day to fire them.

Though bald eagles are no longer an endangered species, harming them invites prosecution on the state and federal levels.

RELATED: Army veteran rescues eagle dangling from tree during nation’s birthday weekend

An email from Hess was forwarded to the residents of the town regarding the decision. A copy of the email was shared with Rare.us:

7 things to know about the human plague, symptoms and how to protect yourself

Published: Tuesday, June 27, 2017 @ 3:39 PM

A bubonic plague smear, prepared from a lymph removed from an adenopathic lymph node, or bubo, of a plague patient, demonstrates the presence of the Yersinia pestis bacteria that causes the plague in this undated photo.  (Photo by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Getty Images)
Getty Images/Getty Images

Two new cases of the human plague have been confirmed in New Mexico Tuesday, according to health officials.

» RELATED: Possible plague case in Georgia 

This year, New Mexico has seen three cases of the plague, the first of which was reported in early June.

>> Read more trending news

All three cases required hospitalization, according to the New Mexico Department of Health.

Here are seven things to know about the plague:

What is it?

According to Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, plague is a disease caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis that affects humans and other mammals.

» RELATED: Stray cat's plague death prompts 'fever watch' 

What is the history of plague?

Historians and scientists have recorded three major plague pandemics, according to the CDC.

The first, called the Justinian Plague (after 6th century Byzantine emperor Justinian I), began in A.D. 541 in central Africa and spread to Egypt and the Mediterranean.

The “Great Plague” or “Black Death” originated in China in 1334 and eventually spread to Europe, where approximately 60 percent of the population died of the disease.

» RELATED: The 'Black Death': Are gerbils, not rats, to blame for plague? 

Lastly, the 1860s “Modern Plague,” which also began in China, spread to port cities around the world by rats on steamships, according to the CDC.

In 1894, French bacteriologist Alexandre Yersin discovered the causative bacterium, Yersinia pestis.

Ten million deaths resulted from the last pandemic, which eventually affected mammals in the Americas, Africa and Asia.

It was during this last pandemic that scientists identified infectious flea bites as the culprit in the spread of the disease.

More about the history of plague.

Where in the U.S. is human plague most common?

Human plague usually occurs after an outbreak in which several susceptible rodents die, infected fleas leave the dead rodents and seek blood from other hosts.

These outbreaks usually occur in southwestern states, particularly in Arizona, California, Colorado and New Mexico, according to the CDC.

» RELATED: Lyme disease risks could increase after mouse plague, experts warn 

According to the World Health Organization, an average of five to 15 cases occur annually in the U.S.

Since 1900, more than 80 percent of those cases have been in the bubonic form.

Worldwide, there are approximately 1,000-3,000 cases of naturally occurring plague reported every year.

More about plague in the U.S.

How do humans and other animals get plague?

Usually, humans get plague after a bite from a rodent flea carrying the bacterium.

Humans can also get plague after handling (touching or skinning) an animal (like squirrels, prairie dogs, rats or rabbits) infected with plague.

According to the CDC, inhaling droplets from the cough of an infected human or mammal (sick cats, in particular) can also lead to plague.

» RELATED: Rare tick-borne illness worries some medical professionals 

What are the types of plague and their symptoms?

Bubonic plague (most common)

  • Tender, warm and swollen nymph nodes in the groin, armpit or neck usually develop within a week after an infected flea bite.
  • Signs and symptoms include sudden fever and chills, headache, fatigue, muscle aches.
  • If bubonic plague is not treated, it can spread to other areas of body and lead to septicemic or pneumonic plague.

Septicemic plague

  • Occurs when bacteria multiply in the bloodstream.
  • Signs and symptoms include fever and chills; abdominal pain; diarrhea; vomiting; extreme fatigue and light-headedness; bleeding from mouth, nose, rectum, under skin; shock; gangrene (blackening, tissue death) in fingers, toes and nose.
  • Septicemic plague can quickly lead to organ failure.

Pneumonic plague (least common)

  • Pneumonic plague, which affects the lungs, is the most dangerous plague and is easily spread person-to-person through cough droplets.
  • Signs and symptoms (within a few hours after infection) include bloody cough, difficulty breathing, high fever, nausea, vomiting, headache, weakness.
  • If it is not treated quickly, pneumonic plague is almost always fatal.

» RELATED: What is Lyme disease and how to avoid it 

How is plague treated?

Immediately see a doctor if you develop symptoms of plague and have been in an area where the disease is known to occur.
Your doctor will likely give you strong antibiotics (streptomycin, gentamicin or others) to combat the disease.

If there are serious complications like organ failure or bleeding abnormalities, doctors will administer intravenous fluids, respiratory support and give patients oxygen.

How to protect yourself, your family and your pets against plague

You and your family

The CDC warns against picking up or touching dead animals and letting pets sleep in the bed with you.

Experts also recommend eliminating any nesting places for rodents such as sheds, garages or rock piles, brush, trash and excess firewood.

Other ways to protect yourself and your family include wearing gloves if handling dead or sick animals, using an insect repellent with DEET to prevent flea bites and reporting sick or dead animals to your local health department or to law enforcement officials.

» RELATED: Ticks the season: How to prevent, find and get rid of ticks this summer 

Pets

Flea medicine should be administered regular for both dogs and cats.

Keep your pet’s food in rodent-proof containers and don’t let them hunt or roam in rodent habitats.

If your pet becomes ill, see a veterinarian as soon as possible.

More about plague at CDC.gov.