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Lucky shelter dog saved from tragic end in Asia, again in NY

Published: Thursday, March 16, 2017 @ 1:28 PM

A shelter dog, similar to the one pictured above, is a 'true miracle dog,' according to Animal Haven shelter. The dog was rescued twice from a tragic end.
David Silverman/Getty Images
A shelter dog, similar to the one pictured above, is a 'true miracle dog,' according to Animal Haven shelter. The dog was rescued twice from a tragic end.(David Silverman/Getty Images)

 

A lucky New York shelter dog named Pandy seems to have almost as many lives as a cat.

Pandy was saved from a meat market in Thailand and taken to the Animal Haven shelter in New York. 

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“She was rescued from the dog meat trade in Asia — the illegal dog meat trade,” shelter executive director Tiffany Lacey told CBS New York.

Then, as a snowstorm stuck the city on Tuesday, the 4-year-old pooch got spooked and ran off while she was being walked in SoHo by a volunteer.

The frightened dog ran 40 blocks through Manhattan in freezing temperatures all the way to the Lincoln Tunnel, where officers from the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey managed to grab her leash when she was halfway through the tunnel.

The officers took the cold and wet dog with bloody paws to the ASPCA to have her microchip scanned, ABC7NY.com reported.

Animal Haven was relieved and happy to have Pandy back.

“PURE JOY,” the shelter said in a post on its Facebook page.

“We can’t even begin to tell you how grateful we are for the army of animal lovers who helped her find her way back … She is a true miracle dog.” 

Driver arrested while rushing beloved dog to animal hospital

Published: Monday, December 04, 2017 @ 6:19 AM

Mass. Man Arrested For Speeding While Taking Injured Dog To Animal Hospital

Some people say they would do anything to protect their pets, but a Holliston, Massachusetts, man kept his promise to his dog – even if it meant getting arrested.

>> Watch the news report here

Peter Rogaishio's Thursday started like any other, until his family's beloved Doberman, Thor, was run over by two vehicles.

"I heard a big bang and then a few seconds later I heard a howl that just made the hair on the back of my neck stand up," said Rogaishio. "He was lying on the street, so I dragged him off to the side of the street and called 911."

Holliston police tried to find a way to get Thor to an animal hospital, but the dog was still bleeding on the side of the road half an hour later. 

In a desperate attempt to save his pup's life, Rogaishio put Thor in the back seat of his car and rushed to the vet, even if that meant illegally passing other vehicles and speeding.

"I wasn't even thinking, I was just trying to get through the traffic safely," Rogaishio said.

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However, it didn't take long before a Natick police officer spotted Rogaishio's aggressive driving on West Central Street and chased him for more than a mile. 

Natick police then set up a roadblock on Hartford Street, making it clear they were on to Rogaishio.

With their guns drawn, police handcuffed Rogaishio and were ready to send him to jail when they saw Thor in the car.

"They finally looked in the truck and saw the dog. They jumped in and took the dog and then took me to jail," said Rogaishio.

The good news, however, is that Thor, despite his three broken legs, is expected to survive.

Rogaishio also has been released from jail.

He tells WFXT that, despite the craziness of it all, he did what he had to do.

"He's such a good dog, a loving dog. I would do anything to save him," said Rogaishio. "We got him at two months old and that's all we have. He's just a delight. He's a joy to my heart. He's my everything."

A neighbor and friend of the Rogaishios has set up a GoFundMe page to help with the animal hospital charges which you can help by clicking here.

Cat reunited with family 7 weeks after Santa Rosa fire

Published: Thursday, November 30, 2017 @ 7:05 PM

Images of the Northern California Wildfires

A California family who thought their beloved cat, Thomas, was killed in the wildfires that destroyed their home in October received a pleasant, purring surprise this week.

Dani Stockham can thank a compassionate park ranger, and a microchip for the miraculous reunion.

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After a cat's remains were found in the rubble of the Stockham's residence days after the fire, the family assumed it was Thomas and said their goodbyes, KTVU reported.

Seven weeks later, San Francisco Park Ranger Shannon Jay contacted the family with good news. He had been setting traps to capture pets lost in the wildfires. The cat's microchip was scanned, confirming that the Stockhams were the owners. Jay was able to reach the Stockham family via email, KTVU reported.

The Stockhams said that 45 days in the wild has left Thomas a bit thinner and exhausted, but he was meowing and purring when he was reunited with his family.

Denver passes bill banning cat declawing

Published: Tuesday, November 14, 2017 @ 7:03 PM

Denver City Council has passed a bill that bans surgery that declaws cats.
Putu Sayoga/Getty Images/Getty Images
Denver City Council has passed a bill that bans surgery that declaws cats.(Putu Sayoga/Getty Images/Getty Images)

A proposed bill that would ban declawing cats was unanimously passed at a Denver City Council meeting in Colorado on Monday.

WUSA reported that the ordinance is effective immediately.

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Declawing occurs in a procedure known as onychectomy. In the operation, an animal’s claws are removed and most or all of the last bone of each of the front toes of an animal is removed. Nerves, tendons and ligaments are severed. 

“Onychectomy is an amputation and should be regarded as a major surgery,” according to the American Veterinary Medical AssociationThe Humane Society of the United States says the effects of the surgery can include death of tissue, paw pain, infection, back pain, lameness and death. 

According to The Denver Post, practicing veterinarian Casara Andre said declawing can be performed in a way that prevents pain for the pet, although she opposes the surgery as a routine operation.

“A decision to declaw a cat is affected by many human and animal factors,” Andre said at a public hearing Nov. 6. “The well-being of the animal and their human family is best defended by providing owners with education about alternatives to declawing, appropriate training for family cats, and well-informed discussions between that pet owner and their veterinary medicine provider.”

Kirsten Butler, a veterinary technician, said she no longer participates in the procedures.

“Having run anesthesia on declaw procedures, I can tell you it is an awkward and disheartening feeling to keep something alive while it is mutilated in front of you,” she said at the hour-long hearing.

Eight cities in California, including Los Angeles and San Francisco, have passed bans on declawing. Australia, Japan, Brazil, Israel and multiple countries in Europe also have similar bans.

Alternatives to declawing include regular trimming of cat’s claws, stable scratching posts around the home, soft plastic caps for the cat’s nails and a special tape that can deter cats from scratching furniture.

7 things to know about The National Dog Show

Published: Thursday, November 09, 2017 @ 1:33 PM

The National Dog Show - Fun Facts

The National Dog Show, one of the most anticipated dog shows in the nation, returns Nov. 18 and 19 in Philadelphia. Since 2002, television viewing of the National Dog Show has been a Thanksgiving tradition in homes across the nation. 

Presented by Purina and hosted by the Kennel Club of Philadelphia, the show features more than 150 American Kennel Club-sanctioned breeds and varieties competing for Best of Breed, First in Group and the top-dog spot: Best in Show.
 
Here’s what you need to know about the show that celebrates man’s best friend.
 
1. You don’t have to go to Philadelphia to catch the show. 

There’s no need to book a trip to The National Dog Show: NBC’s top-rated broadcast of the show airs at noon Thanksgiving Day, immediately following the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. The two-hour show features hosts John O’Hurley, Mary Carillo and David Frei and regularly reaches nearly 20 million dog-lovers in the comfort of their homes.
 
2. The show has been airing since 2002, but it’s been around for much longer than that.
 
The Kennel Club of Philadelphia Dog Show has been in existence since 1879 with minimal interruptions. When NBC Sports began airing the show in 2002, it was rebranded as The National Dog Show. 
 
The show is one of only three major dog shows in the nation, ranked along with the AKC National Championship and the Westminster Dog Show.
 
3. There are seven groups of dogs.
 
There may be more than 2,000 dogs entered in the show, but when the coveted Best in Show competition takes place, you’ll only see seven dogs. These canines are the best of the best, representing seven groups and the characteristics and functions for which the breeds were originally intended: the Terrier Group, the Toy Group, the Working Group, the Sporting Group, the Hound Group, the Non-Sporting Group and the Herding Group.
 
4. There’s no new breed this year, but you can catch a glimpse of 2018’s new sanctioned breed during the show.
 
For the first time since 2006, no new breed has been added to The National Dog Show competition. But viewers don’t have to wait to find out if 2018 holds the same fate: the newly sanctioned bred for next year’s competition - the Nederlandse Kooikerhondje - will be a participant in the Miscellaneous Class at this year’s show.
 
A spaniel-type dog of Dutch descent, the Nederlandse Kooikerhondje will join the Working Group in 2018.
 
5. It’s a benched show, and that’s kind of a big deal.
 
An untrained dog-show enthusiast may be wondering why a benched distinction makes a difference. Participating dogs are required to stay on assigned benches when not in competition, an awesome feat of discipline and character. 
 
The benching makes the canine competitors accessible to all on site and allows for interaction and provides an easy way to ask questions and share information. 

The National Dog Show is one of the oldest and few remaining benched shows in the United States.
  
6. The judges are picky, and rightly so.

Over the course of the show, judges will have seen hundreds of dogs. But what exactly are these discerning individuals looking to find?
 
The questions are tough: Is the dog able to perform the job the breed was originally bred to do? Does the dog have all of the physical characteristics typical of their breed? How fit is the dog? Does the dog have the correct gait? 
 
But wait, there’s more: Judges are also looking for happy dogs that enjoy the competition so each dog’s expression and general demeanor receives extra scrutiny.
 
7. Those long names may sound excessive, but there’s a good reason for them.
 
Gia, a greyhound, was 2016’s Best in Show, but her proper name is GCHS CH Grandcru Giaconda CGC. While it may seem a little crazy, there’s a method to the madness of the competitor naming. 

That long and hard-to-read name reads like a history lesson on the dog’s life. Components of the dog’s name can be pulled from many different places: the name of the kennel where the dog was born, notations about the dog’s qualifications or prizes and a part of the name that’s specific to the dog.