Giant 3-foot rabbit found dead on United Airlines flight

Published: Wednesday, April 26, 2017 @ 12:29 PM

Giant 3-Foot Rabbit Found Dead On United Airlines Flight

While still dealing with legal action and negative public relations after a man was forcibly dragged from a flight, United Airlines is now investigating an incident in which a giant rabbit was found dead aboard one of the airline’s international flights.  

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According to the BBC, a nearly 3-foot-long giant rabbit named Simon was traveling from London’s Heathrow airport to Chicago’s O'Hare airport in the cargo space of a United plane on April 19.

The rabbit was being shipped to a new owner in the U.S.

Simon’s breeder, Annette Edwards, from Worcestershire, England, said the rabbit had been seen by a veterinarian hours before the flight. 

“Simon had a vet’s checkup three hours before the flight and was fit as a fiddle,” Edwards told The Sun. “I’ve sent rabbits all around the world and nothing like this has happened before.”

Edwards said the unidentified American buyer is upset.

“I haven’t got a clue who’s to blame, but it’s certainly very weird when Simon was so healthy,” Edwards told CNN.

Simon, a 10-month-old Continental Giant rabbit, was poised to grow to be the world’s largest rabbit, according to NBC News. The largest rabbit on record, as noted by the Guinness World Records, is Simon’s father, a 4-foot-4-inch and 50-pound animal named Darius.

“We were saddened to hear this news. The safety and well-being of all the animals that travel with us is of the utmost importance to United Airlines and our PetSafe team,” the airline said in a statement. “We have been in contact with our customer and have offered assistance. We are reviewing this matter.”

(Horacio Villalobos - Corbis/Corbis via Getty Images)

Earlier this month, United Airlines made headlines when a passenger, David Dao, was forcibly removed from a flight after refusing to give up his seat for a United employee on a fully booked flight. United CEO Oscar Munoz said no one would be fired for the incident.

VIDEO: Passenger Removed From United Airlines Flight

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Denver passes bill banning cat declawing

Published: Tuesday, November 14, 2017 @ 7:03 PM

Denver City Council has passed a bill that bans surgery that declaws cats.
Putu Sayoga/Getty Images/Getty Images
Denver City Council has passed a bill that bans surgery that declaws cats.(Putu Sayoga/Getty Images/Getty Images)

A proposed bill that would ban declawing cats was unanimously passed at a Denver City Council meeting in Colorado on Monday.

WUSA reported that the ordinance is effective immediately.

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Declawing occurs in a procedure known as onychectomy. In the operation, an animal’s claws are removed and most or all of the last bone of each of the front toes of an animal is removed. Nerves, tendons and ligaments are severed. 

“Onychectomy is an amputation and should be regarded as a major surgery,” according to the American Veterinary Medical AssociationThe Humane Society of the United States says the effects of the surgery can include death of tissue, paw pain, infection, back pain, lameness and death. 

According to The Denver Post, practicing veterinarian Casara Andre said declawing can be performed in a way that prevents pain for the pet, although she opposes the surgery as a routine operation.

“A decision to declaw a cat is affected by many human and animal factors,” Andre said at a public hearing Nov. 6. “The well-being of the animal and their human family is best defended by providing owners with education about alternatives to declawing, appropriate training for family cats, and well-informed discussions between that pet owner and their veterinary medicine provider.”

Kirsten Butler, a veterinary technician, said she no longer participates in the procedures.

“Having run anesthesia on declaw procedures, I can tell you it is an awkward and disheartening feeling to keep something alive while it is mutilated in front of you,” she said at the hour-long hearing.

Eight cities in California, including Los Angeles and San Francisco, have passed bans on declawing. Australia, Japan, Brazil, Israel and multiple countries in Europe also have similar bans.

Alternatives to declawing include regular trimming of cat’s claws, stable scratching posts around the home, soft plastic caps for the cat’s nails and a special tape that can deter cats from scratching furniture.

7 things to know about The National Dog Show

Published: Thursday, November 09, 2017 @ 1:33 PM

The National Dog Show - Fun Facts

The National Dog Show, one of the most anticipated dog shows in the nation, returns Nov. 18 and 19 in Philadelphia. Since 2002, television viewing of the National Dog Show has been a Thanksgiving tradition in homes across the nation. 

Presented by Purina and hosted by the Kennel Club of Philadelphia, the show features more than 150 American Kennel Club-sanctioned breeds and varieties competing for Best of Breed, First in Group and the top-dog spot: Best in Show.
 
Here’s what you need to know about the show that celebrates man’s best friend.
 
1. You don’t have to go to Philadelphia to catch the show. 

There’s no need to book a trip to The National Dog Show: NBC’s top-rated broadcast of the show airs at noon Thanksgiving Day, immediately following the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. The two-hour show features hosts John O’Hurley, Mary Carillo and David Frei and regularly reaches nearly 20 million dog-lovers in the comfort of their homes.
 
2. The show has been airing since 2002, but it’s been around for much longer than that.
 
The Kennel Club of Philadelphia Dog Show has been in existence since 1879 with minimal interruptions. When NBC Sports began airing the show in 2002, it was rebranded as The National Dog Show. 
 
The show is one of only three major dog shows in the nation, ranked along with the AKC National Championship and the Westminster Dog Show.
 
3. There are seven groups of dogs.
 
There may be more than 2,000 dogs entered in the show, but when the coveted Best in Show competition takes place, you’ll only see seven dogs. These canines are the best of the best, representing seven groups and the characteristics and functions for which the breeds were originally intended: the Terrier Group, the Toy Group, the Working Group, the Sporting Group, the Hound Group, the Non-Sporting Group and the Herding Group.
 
4. There’s no new breed this year, but you can catch a glimpse of 2018’s new sanctioned breed during the show.
 
For the first time since 2006, no new breed has been added to The National Dog Show competition. But viewers don’t have to wait to find out if 2018 holds the same fate: the newly sanctioned bred for next year’s competition - the Nederlandse Kooikerhondje - will be a participant in the Miscellaneous Class at this year’s show.
 
A spaniel-type dog of Dutch descent, the Nederlandse Kooikerhondje will join the Working Group in 2018.
 
5. It’s a benched show, and that’s kind of a big deal.
 
An untrained dog-show enthusiast may be wondering why a benched distinction makes a difference. Participating dogs are required to stay on assigned benches when not in competition, an awesome feat of discipline and character. 
 
The benching makes the canine competitors accessible to all on site and allows for interaction and provides an easy way to ask questions and share information. 

The National Dog Show is one of the oldest and few remaining benched shows in the United States.
  
6. The judges are picky, and rightly so.

Over the course of the show, judges will have seen hundreds of dogs. But what exactly are these discerning individuals looking to find?
 
The questions are tough: Is the dog able to perform the job the breed was originally bred to do? Does the dog have all of the physical characteristics typical of their breed? How fit is the dog? Does the dog have the correct gait? 
 
But wait, there’s more: Judges are also looking for happy dogs that enjoy the competition so each dog’s expression and general demeanor receives extra scrutiny.
 
7. Those long names may sound excessive, but there’s a good reason for them.
 
Gia, a greyhound, was 2016’s Best in Show, but her proper name is GCHS CH Grandcru Giaconda CGC. While it may seem a little crazy, there’s a method to the madness of the competitor naming. 

That long and hard-to-read name reads like a history lesson on the dog’s life. Components of the dog’s name can be pulled from many different places: the name of the kennel where the dog was born, notations about the dog’s qualifications or prizes and a part of the name that’s specific to the dog.

Groomer gives matted, abandoned dog a much-needed makeover

Published: Saturday, October 14, 2017 @ 12:56 PM

Matted dog groomed at Oviedo BGE Grooming in Florida.
Kari Falla
Matted dog groomed at Oviedo BGE Grooming in Florida.(Kari Falla)

A Florida dog groomer is being praised for her quick work in helping save an abandoned dog in distress.

The groomer’s husband told WFTV's Angela Jacobs on Friday that the dog was found late Wednesday after good Samaritans saved it from being hit by a car along a road in Oviedo.

The dog was so severely matted, the groomer’s husband said, it could barely see through its neglected and overgrown hair. The dog also had to be carried and was unable to walk or wag his tail.

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BGE Grooming was contacted due to the dog’s poor condition. The dog groomer, Kari Falla, immediately opened the salon at midnight to begin working on the dog. 

WFTV learned Falla worked on the dog until after 3 a.m. to return its coat to good condition.

A viewer familiar with the incident contacted WFTV and said, “She (Kari) didn't stop there. Today she got with a local vet and they took the dog and they are currently housing and going to find a forever home.”

While the dog undergoes its medical evaluation, Falla reported on her Facebook page that the dog is playing happily with lots of tail-wagging. 

Dog rescued from dumpster headed to landfill

Published: Friday, September 08, 2017 @ 5:46 PM



DodgertonSkillhause/Morguefile
(DodgertonSkillhause/Morguefile)

A dog in Michigan was rescued just in time after she was found Friday in a dumpster on its way to a landfill.

The dog, a mixed-breed female, tumbled out with the trash when a roll-off dumpster was emptied at a Detroit transfer station, WXYZ reported. The garbage was headed to the landfill.

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Detroit Pit Crew Dog Rescue was called and took the dog to a veterinarian to be examined. The dog, named Parlay by her rescuers, did not appear to be injured from her harrowing dumpster journey. She also is heartworm negative and is not pregnant, though rescuer Theresa Sumpter told WXYZ that she thinks Parlay may have given birth recently.

Sumpter said she frequently sees dogs being abandoned after giving birth. She said the person who placed Parlay in the dumpster was, "really an idiot, truly a moron."

Parlay exhibits sweet and gentle behavior. She can be seen receiving a bath in a video posted on the Detroit Pit Crew Dog Rescue Facebook page. Parlay will spend time in a foster home until she is medically cleared, and then will be available for adoption.