NICU nurse falls in love with preemie, adopts her

Published: Friday, March 25, 2016 @ 7:09 PM

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A pediatric nurse formed such a strong bond with a baby in the NICU that she just had to adopt her.

Amber Boyd had cared for Nicole since she was a few months old.

Nicole suffered from a rare birth defect called omphalocele, which caused her organs to develop in a sack outside of her body, according to the Today Show.

Amber quickly became little Nicole’s primary nurse.

>> Read more trending stories

"She was with us for 18 months and that whole time I was her primary nurse and formed that bond," Nicole said. "She is just a fighter… she is a great kid."

KOB reported that Nicole's medical needs were too much for her family, and her mother's parental rights were terminated.

Nicole, who has a twin sister who does not have the same condition as her and lives with biological relatives, became a ward of the state of New Mexico.

Now 3, Nicole is able to walk, and doctors do not think she experienced brain damage.  (via Today Show)

Posted by People on Thursday, March 24, 2016

As her health improved, caseworkers started to discuss where Nicole would go after she was discharged.

Boyd, who was adopted as a child, realized she could take in the baby girl. Her husband, Taylor Boyd, quickly agreed.

"I don’t think I was surprised at all, honestly," Taylor Boyd said. "I think (Amber’s) just a very selfless personality. It is very much in her nature. Just any chance she gets, she does everything she can to be selfless."

Nicole soon moved in with her new parents, and she underwent surgery in October to close her belly and attach her abdominal muscles.

The Boyds became Nicole's foster parents. In February, they officially adopted her.

Now Nicole is 3years old and is the picture of happiness.

"She's incredible," Amber Boyd said. "She has learned in one short year … to crawl, stand and walk."

The family has had challenges, however.

Nicole has to have her trach changed daily and has dealt with multiple surgeries and cardiac arrests.

But the Boyds are happy to have Nicole in their family.

"I can't imagine a time without her," says Taylor Boyd. "We have only had her for a short amount of time (but) she has become a huge part of the family."

Amber Boyd's older sister, Meli Gonzales, set up a GoFundMe page to help the Boyds buy a new car to help foster more children with special medical needs.

"It is like a perfect fit. I don't know how to explain it, it was just right," says nurse Nicole Boyd, after the adoption of her daughter was official.

Posted by TODAY Parents on Thursday, March 24, 2016

Flu virus spread by breathing, study finds

Published: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 1:06 PM


Joe Raedle/Getty Images
(Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Most people believe that the influenza virus is spread through the coughs and sneezes of infected people, but new research published Thursday suggests that the flu virus is spread more easily than previously thought.

>> Read more trending news

Medical professionals believe that the virus is spread most often by “droplets made when people with flu cough, sneeze or talk,” according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But researchers studying how the virus spreads recently found large amounts of the virus in the breath of people suffering from the flu, according to the University of Maryland’s School of Public Health.

>> Related: Influenza surveillance map: Where is the flu in my state? 

The researchers -- from the University of Maryland, San Jose State University, Missouri Western State University and the University of California, Berkeley -- published their findings Thursday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

“We found that flu cases contaminated the air around them with infectious virus just by breathing, without coughing or sneezing,” said Donald Milton, professor of environmental health in the University of Maryland School of Public Health and lead researcher for the study.

Milton and his team examined the virus content in the breath of 142 people who were diagnosed with flu as they were breathing normally, speaking, coughing and sneezing. Researchers found that a majority of those who participated in the study had enough of the infectious virus in just their regular, exhaled breath to possibly infect another person.

A review of the data collected from the coughs and sneezes of infected participants showed that neither action appeared to have a large impact on whether or not the virus was spread.

>> Related: 11 things parents need to know about the flu, the vaccine, how long kids need to stay out of school  

“People with flu generate infectious aerosols (tiny droplets that stay suspended in the air for a long time), even when they are not coughing and especially during the first days of illness,” Milton said.

The study’s authors said the results highlighted how necessary it is for people who have the flu to stay at home.

>> Related: What is the H3N2 flu and how bad is flu season this year? 

“The study findings suggest that keeping surfaces clean, washing our hands all the time, and avoiding people who are coughing does not provide complete protection from getting the flu,” said Sheryl Ehrman, the dean of the Charles W. Davidson College of Engineering at San Jose State University. “Staying home and out of public spaces could make a difference in the spread of the influenza virus.”

<p>5 Reasons to get a Flu Shot</p>(Bryan Erdy/News | WHBQ)

This local woman dropped 243 pounds. But she said real beauty didn’t come until her life crumbled.

Published: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 6:00 AM

Kelley Gunter (the author of "You Have Such a Pretty Face") she didn't learn the real meaning of beauty until she lost nearly everything. Video by Amelia Robinson.

Based on what she’s done in this life, Kelley Gunter guesses she probably barked and walked on all fours in the last one. 

“I must have been a dog in a past life because I am so loyal,” the Troy resident joked during our meeting at Ghostlight Coffee in Dayton’s South Park neighborhood. 

In flawless makeup and straightened hair, Kelley sat across from me with a big mug of hot chocolate. 

>> 10 things to look forward to when the weather warms up

She’d later email me the hot chocolate recipe her spunky grandmother used to make. 

Striking at 5-feet, 9-inches tall, Kelley and her visual beauty are hard to miss. 

But her face and body were frequent topics of conversation when she weighed 391 pounds, too. 

“People would constantly say to me, ‘Kelley, it is a shame; you have such a pretty face’,” Kelley said. “My entire existence was a shame because I was packed into a body that was unacceptable (to them). People think that is a compliment, but it is so not a compliment.”

‘YOU HAVE SUCH A PRETTY FACE ‘

Troy resident Kelley Gunter, the author of the new book "You Have Such a Pretty Face," loss 243 with the help of weight loss surgery in 2002. She says true transformation came when he sought help for her destructive behavior. She lives with her son Alec and three Rottweilers.

Kelley outlines the emotional journey that took her through bariatric surgery, loose skin removal, losing almost everything, and finally recognizing true beauty in her new self-published book, “You Have Such a Pretty Face.” 

>> Best way to lose weight with the most minimal effort

The paperback book is $16.99 and available for purchase on kelleygunter.comAmazon and other online booksellers. 

Even after her weight loss surgery 16 years ago and losing and keeping off 243 pounds, Kelley said she felt like true happiness eluded her.  

“I always looked to feel pretty for someone else,” she told me. “My whole life I was fighting for people who didn’t have a voice. I didn’t realize in all of it, I was losing my own voice because I couldn’t fight for myself.” 

It took a fast crash and a hard fall for her to achieve that self-awareness. 

EARTH SHAKING

Kelley, a Pleasant Hill native, said she was an achiever even before her days as a cheerleader and member of the Newton High School homecoming court. 

Kelley, a prom princess, continued achieving in college. 

She earned a bachelor’s degree in sociology from Wright State University and a master’s in clinical, counseling and applied psychology from the University of Dayton. 

She founded and led Isaiah’s Place, a Christian-based foster care agency launched in 2003 and based at 1100 Wayne St. in Troy. 

She lived in a four bedroom house last valued at $340,600 by the Miami County Auditor’s Office. 

Though called “Tree Truck Legs” and “Richter” in high school by bullies who said she shook the Earth when she jumped, Kelley said she actually started packing on the weight during her college days. 

Troy resident Kelley Gunter, the author of the new book "You Have Such a Pretty Face," loss 243 with the help of weight loss surgery in 2002. She says true transformation came when he sought help for her destructive behavior. She lives with her son Alec and three Rottweilers.

Miserable and labeled morbidly obese, she had weight loss surgery in August 2002 at age 37. 

Life wasn’t a fairy tale.  

After the skin surgeries that removed 11 pounds of skin from her stomach alone, Kelley said she continued to hide and suppress truth about her traumatic childhood. Self-destruction was always around the corner. 

In November of 2016, Kelley was forced to resign from Isaiah’s Place on the heels of a public scandal involving what authorities said was more than $100,000 in missing funds. Her nice big house is now in foreclosure, according to Miami County court records. 

>> PREVIOUS COVERAGE: Foster care agency funds may have been used for gambling, vacations 

Kelley and her 22-year-old son, Alec, now live with their three rottweilers in a two-bedroom home she had once rented out. 

“I lost everything and everyone except my son,” she told me. 

It was a hard pill, but Kelley says it is one she had to shallow. 

“God had to break me. I would not have broke if people were cushioning my fall,” she told me. “I didn’t take care of what God blessed me with, which is why God took it away. I was just out of control. You run from yourself, but it is not a race you can win.”

LIARS, WOMANIZERS AND THE SHOPPER

Troy resident Kelley Gunter, the author of the new book "You Have Such a Pretty Face," loss 243 with the help of weight loss surgery in 2002. She says true transformation came when he sought help for her destructive behavior. She lives with her son Alec and three Rottweilers.

What followed was intense treatment in Sedona, Ariz., where Kelley says she addressed the sexual abuse she faced between ages 5 and 12 and had buried deep in her soul.

Through therapy, she said she learned that ignored pain contributed to a life of poor decision-making (she says she takes responsibility for the financial mismanagement of Isaiah’s Place) and bad relationships. 

“I was just destroying myself, really. I never had a grasp of the destructive factors in my life. If I wasn’t dating the wrong man, I was dating a worse man,” she said. 

There were liars, womanizers and a long line of general users, Kelley says. When she wasn’t focused on them, she says she was shopping. 

In her book, she writes: 

“I shopped more than anyone should ever shop. I couldn’t overeat anymore, but I could shop. It felt good to be able to buy anything I wanted.... I would buy more than I needed and then not even wear half of it. I would charge my credit cards until the were maxed and then stress out over how I was going to pay them off. I would shop for gifts for people who didn’t deserve gifts from me. I would give and give and give. I suppose I thought that if I gave enough, those people would love me. I never for one second thought that just giving myself was plenty.” 

TIME IN THE LIGHT 

Troy resident Kelley Gunter, the author of the new book "You Have Such a Pretty Face," loss 243 with the help of weight loss surgery in 2002. She says true transformation came when he sought help for her destructive behavior. She lives with her son Alec and three Rottweilers.

Kelley said she didn’t tell anyone — not even her best friend — about the sexual abuse. After coming forward, she’s heard from others with similar stories. 

“It’s a beautiful thing to stand in the light of the truth,” she said. “Why did I have to carry shame?” 

>> Oregon District fixture fighting back following devastating illness

Kelley says she now recognizes that even her social work efforts were a mask of sorts. 

“I am that much healthier for allowing that out of my soul. My soul was just screaming, ‘I want to be heard’,” she said. “I knew kids and I knew hurting kids. It meant the world to me. I knew how they felt, and I knew how to work for those kids.” 

Kelley has always had a passion for writing, and has in the past penned words published by the Troy Daily News and the Dayton Daily News, where she was a freelance writer. 

Now, Kelley says she hopes to help people by telling her stories. 

“I was willing to do all the work I needed to do to come out a better me,” she said. “Every one of us is so much more than what’s been done to us.” 

She is penning her second book, “The Homecoming Queen of Crazy Town,” and plans to write “Any Color as Long as it is Red,” a book based on the outlandish and wise sayings her grandmother made up.

Before her life changed forever 15 months ago, Kelley said she was loyal to everyone but herself. 

“I feel very beautiful now,” she said. “What I know is who I am created to be, and no one else can define that for me.”

>>  Troy man on Steve Austin’s show: “It was intense, but we knew it was going to be intense”

Troy resident Kelley Gunter, the author of the new book "You Have Such a Pretty Face," loss 243 with the help of weight loss surgery in 2002. She says true transformation came when he sought help for her destructive behavior. She lives with her son Alec and three Rottweilers.

Troy resident Kelley Gunter, the author of the new book "You Have Such a Pretty Face," loss 243 with the help of weight loss surgery in 2002. She says true transformation came when he sought help for her destructive behavior. She lives with her son Alec and three Rottweilers.

Troy resident Kelley Gunter, the author of the new book "You Have Such a Pretty Face," loss 243 with the help of weight loss surgery in 2002. She says true transformation came when he sought help for her destructive behavior. She lives with her son Alec and three Rottweilers.

Troy resident Kelley Gunter, the author of the new book "You Have Such a Pretty Face," loss 243 with the help of weight loss surgery in 2002. She says true transformation came when he sought help for her destructive behavior. She lives with her son Alec and three Rottweilers.

Troy resident Kelley Gunter, the author of the new book "You Have Such a Pretty Face," loss 243 with the help of weight loss surgery in 2002. She says true transformation came when he sought help for her destructive behavior. She lives with her son Alec and three Rottweilers.

5 questions every woman in her 40s should ask her doctor

Published: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 10:36 AM

Women are waiting longer on average to have babies. Now there’s a push for women in their 20s and 30s to spend thousands of dollars to have their eggs stored. So they can improve their chances for pregnancy later in life. Freezing tiny embryos is also an option. At Reproductive Biology Associates, a fertility clinic in Atlanta, lab workers fertilize patients’ eggs, one by one, with sperm. This lab worker uses a tube and the suction of her breath to hold the material in place for the delicate pro

Women who are in their 40s are in many cases reaching a new stage in their lives. Your children may be more independent, and you might have a well-established career. It can also be a time of change, when it's easier to gain weight, and you may start to see the first signs of menopause.

»RELATED: 4 questions every woman in her 30s should ask her doctor

Being informed about the changes you may face during your 40s is an important way to protect your health for many years to come. It pays to have regular checkups and discuss any potential issues or concerns with your doctor. In addition, you may want to undergo some health screenings to confirm or rule out problems that may be more common after age 40.

The following are five questions every woman in her 40s should ask her doctor:

What supplements should I take?

It's common for women in their 40s to be deficient in nutrients such as vitamin D, according to DoctorOz.com, so it's important to ask your doctor if you should be taking any supplements. This vitamin helps your body absorb calcium, which protects against osteoporosis-related bone loss – a particular concern as you get older.

A blood test can check your vitamin D levels, and if they're low, you may be advised stop smoking, start resistance training and add a supplement to your daily routine.

Should I be tested for diabetes?

Your risk of developing type 2 diabetes increases with age, especially after you're 45, according to Healthline. A blood test can determine whether your body is using insulin efficiently enough to help your body maintain consistent blood glucose levels.

You're at particular risk of developing type 2 diabetes if you're overweight, have a family history of the disease or have a history of gestational diabetes. If you have this disease, you're at an increased risk of developing heart disease, blindness and depression.

How can I control my weight?

Women's metabolism slows after age 40, and as a result, you'll need to eat less and exercise in order to maintain the same weight, according to DoctorOz.com. You may also have hypothyroidism – an underactive thyroid gland that can result in weight gain. If you're gaining weight, it's worth asking your doctor about, especially if you have dry skin, feel tired and are less able to tolerate cold temperatures.

Your doctor can treat hypothyroidism and also suggest an appropriate fitness plan that takes into account your age, weight and health history.

Should I keep taking birth control pills?

If you're in your 40s, you may think you've left your child-bearing years behind, but that's not necessarily true. Unless you've been menopausal for more than a year, you'll still need to take birth control. The second highest rate of unintended pregnancy is for sexually active women who are age 40 to 50, JoAnn Pinkerton, executive director of The North American Menopause Society, told the Chicago Tribune.

Doctors have differing opinions on whether you should keep taking birth control pills after age 40, so talk to your doctor to find out what form of contraception he or she recommends for you.

What about menopause?

You may not be thinking about menopause yet, but it's normal for this process to occur at any age from 40 to 59, according to familydoctor.org. For an indication about when this might happen, look to when the older women in your family reached menopause. Although this can influence when you enter menopause, it's not guaranteed.

After menopause, your body produces less estrogen, and this may increase your risk of heart disease, the American Heart Association says. Heart disease is the number-one threat to women's health. Talk to your doctor about symptoms that could indicate your may be headed toward menopause and whether hormone replacement therapy is recommended.

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Fairborn man (and his maroon hat) in new Emilio Estevez movie

Published: Thursday, December 14, 2017 @ 10:00 AM

Former U.S. Marshal and Huber Height police officer “Hickory” William Taylor is taking the film industry by storm. Video by Amelia Robinson

When “Hickory” William Taylor was done with law enforcement, he was done with law enforcement. 

“I didn’t want to arrest people anymore,” the former U.S. Marshal and Huber Heights police officer said. “I had 38 years of that, and I was done.”

Instead of tracking down suspects, Taylor now owns Cape House Collectibles in Beavercreek with his wife Kathy. He also dabbles in the film industry as an extra. 

Taylor has appeared in about a dozen films since retiring in 2014. 

His knit, maroon hat has appeared in about five films, including  “Shoes” from Jamestown- based filmmaker Ramsey Stoneburner and Emilio Estevez’s “The Public,” which is set to open Jan. 31 at the  33rd annual Santa Barbara International Film Festival.

>> Retired local police officer plays really ‘bad cop’ in Matthew McConaughey’s upcoming movie

“I was on the set for 14 days, which is a long time for an extra,” Taylor said of Estevez’s film. “We did things in that movie that I never thought I’d do at 60 years old.” 

He didn’t elaborate to prevent spoilers.  

The son of Dayton native Martin Sheen, Estevez filmed “The Public” in Cincinnati. 

Fairborn area resident "Hickory " William Taylor was an extra in the Emilio Estevez film "The Public" filmed and set in Cincinnati.

>> RELATED: Martin Sheen receives honorary degree from UD

The film is set in Cincinnati and stars Estevez, Alec BaldwinJena MaloneJeffrey WrightTaylor SchillingMichael Kenneth Williams and Che "Rhymefest" Smith.

The movie centers around a police standoff  with homeless library patrons who have staged a sit-in during a life-threatening cold snap. 

>>  LEARN MORE: Estevez dramedy about library standoff to film in Cincinnati

“I am one of the homeless guys. The movie is about us,” Taylor said about his role in “The Public. “There is no place to go and they are throwing us out of the library.”

The Fairborn area resident, one of a several local actors picked as extras in the movie, said he loved hearing stories from Williams, who joined the extras as they ate. He also said he enjoyed working with Estevez, who called him “Doc” during filming.

“He is just like a neighborhood guy. There was not a bit of pompousness in him,” Taylor said of Estevez.

Taylor said he enjoys the small, but important part he has played in “The Public” and other movies.

Most of the time extras are like furniture. We are the background crowd or a guy eating a hamburger,” he said. “The guys appreciate us because they wouldn’t have a movie without us. It would just be actors talking to each other.”  

Taylor has long been interested in acting.

Before joining the Huber Heights police department at age 20, he was an extra in the “Blue Brothers” when he was 19. 

His son and namesake is now studying theater.

An undercover detective for part of his career, Taylor said law enforcement was not always an easy job.  

He recalled the day he was shot at 23 times by a suspect. 

Fairborn area resident "Hickory " William Taylor was an extra in the Jametown filmmaker Ramsey Stoneburner's "The Shoes. He is in the maroon hat. The movie was filmed in Xenia.

Taylor said he helped following the Oklahoma City bombing and a list of hurricanes that include Katrina and Irma. 

On the set of the upcoming John Travolta film “Gotti,” a biopic about crime boss John Gotti, Taylor said he met John Gotti Jr. and actors playing people he helped transport during his time as a U.S. Marshal. 

After ending a law enforcement career started in 1990, Taylor said he decided he wanted to spend the rest of his life doing things he enjoyed. 

“I’ve seen so much ick in my life. I just decided I didn’t want to see that anymore,” he said. 

>> James Franco movies finish filming in Hamilton

Taylor played a moonshiner in James Franco’s yet-to-be released “The Long Home” and a chef in a scene shot in this region for the Robert Redford movie “The Old Man and the Gun” with Redford, Casey Affleck and Sissy Spacey. 

>> RELATED: Downtown Dayton has been taken over by Danny Glover, Robert Redford movie

Dayton filming has begun for "The Old Man and The Gun.The movie stars Robert Redford, Danny Glover, Casey Affleck and Sissy Spacek. Video by Amelia Robinson and Lisa Powell.

Taylor said tons of opportunities have opened up for Dayton actors since Ohio started offering the Motion Picture Tax Credit in recent years.

Everyday people are seizing the opportunity to appear in movies as supporting actors and work behind the camera, he said.

>> 7 movies with unusual connections to Dayton

>>  RELATED: 'BOY BAND' MOVIE TO BE FILMED IN DAYTON

“There are some super talented people,” he said. “They go work a movie and then they go back to their beauty salon and do hair.”

As for himself, Taylor said the maroon hat helps. 

“My buddies give me crap about it. They say the hat needs an agent,” Taylor said. “You have to stand out and you have to be fearless, too.”

Fairborn area resident "Hickory " William Taylor was an extra in the Emilio Estevez film "The Public" filmed and set in Cincinnati.

Fairborn area resident "Hickory" William Taylor was an extra in "Donnybrook," a Tim Sutton movie film in the Cincinnati area.