Meet the Dayton Civic Leaders award winners

Published: Friday, April 14, 2017 @ 6:00 AM

The 2017 Dayton Civic Leaders award winners will be honored at the Boa & Bow Tie Ball on Friday, April 28, 2017.
The 2017 Dayton Civic Leaders award winners will be honored at the Boa & Bow Tie Ball on Friday, April 28, 2017.

Dayton, Ohio is home to more than 300 registered nonprofit organizations, and at the heart of them all are volunteer leaders, many of whom are young professionals. These emerging leaders make a sizable impact on the community in many ways. 

JDRF, in partnership with Generation Dayton, will recognize some of the community's standout volunteers at the Boa & Bow Tie Ball at the Dayton Masonic Center on April 28, 2017.

The Boas and Bow Tie Ball will take place Friday, April 28, 2017.

The Dayton Civic Leaders Awards were designed to recognize emerging leaders ages 21-45 within the local philanthropic community who have exhibited leadership and success within their designated nonprofit cause.

The six recipients of the 2017 award were selected among a competitive pool of applicants by a leadership committee of Dayton-area CEOs who are behind the fundraising efforts of the Boa & Bow Tie Ball, which seeks to raise over $145,000 for JDRF Southwest Ohio.

"We received a substantial number of nominations for the 2017 Dayton Civic Leaders award, and are honored to recognize six deserving recipients," said Samantha Redden, JDRF Dayton Development Coordinator. "Young leaders are an essential part of what we do at JDRF, so I know firsthand how critical they are to the work of nonprofit organizations."

This year’s winners will be recognized at the Boa & Bow Tie Ball, and each will serve as a model during the event's unique live bow tie auction. In addition to recognition of the 2017 Civic Leaders recipients, JDRF will also honor their own Volunteer of the Year recipient, Diane Schoeffler-Warren.

What about the Boa & Bow Tie Ball?

The ball is a unique cocktail party that is the first of its kind in Dayton, and will feature entertainment, food and spirits stations with celebrity bartenders, a silent auction, and live bowtie auction. 

More information and tickets for the Boa & Bow Tie Ball can be found at www.BoaBowTieBall.org

Meet the 2017 class of Dayton Civic Leaders:

Lauryn Bayliff. CONTRIBUTED

Lauryn Bayliff works for Dayton History and spends much of her time raising funds to educate the public of Dayton’s history. Not only does Lauryn work to preserve the community’s past but she’s also focused on the future. Lauryn has participated in Leadership Dayton, Tipp City Restoration & Architectural Board of Review, Generation Dayton, Association of Fundraising Professionals and more. She is dedicated to the city of Dayton and also her hometown, Tipp City.

Jen Cadieux. CONTRIBUTED

Jen Cadieux is one of Dayton’s most involved young professionals. Jen works for the Downtown Dayton Partnership and has served on many different boards in the Dayton area. Some of her most recent involvement includes Levitt Pavilion Dayton, UpDayton, Big Brothers Big Sisters, Generation Dayton, Junior League of Dayton and the Downtown Dayton Plan, Activated Spaces, Pop Up Shop Committee. Jen spends much of her free time giving back to our local community.

AJ Ferguson. CONTRIBUTED

AJ Ferguson took on UpDayton’s Director role in 2015. He spends his time with UpDayton supporting other organizations dedicated to growing and changing Dayton. AJ works to engage the people of Dayton to build up the community and make it more attractive to college students and other young professionals. In addition to his job with UpDayton, AJ volunteers for a handful of other non-profit organizations including United Way, Greater Dayton Conservative Fund, and Montgomery County Arts & Cultural District among others.

Jerod Frenzl. CONTRIBUTED

Jerod Frenzl recently moved to Dayton through AmeriCorps. Quickly he started giving back to the community with his volunteer efforts and his job with Rebuilding Together Dayton. Jerod serves as Generation Dayton’s Community Service Chair and is one of their most involved members. Not only does he dedicate his time to the community but also spends much of his efforts recruiting other young professionals to give back to Dayton.

Cory D. D. Miller. CONTRIBUTED

Cory D.D. Miller was recently voted as one of Dayton.com’s best local celebrities. Cory works for CH Dean and stays well connected in the Dayton area. He’s been involved with many different Dayton organizations and programs including Leadership Dayton, UD Alumni Mentor Program, Crayons to Classrooms Board Member, Beavercreek Chamber of Commerce Board Member, Dayton History Bell Board Member and many others. Cory also started the Beavercreek Young Professional Group.

Lauren Williams. CONTRIBUTED
Lauren Williams works for Capital Senior Living. In addition to her full time job, she has willing stepped into major event leadership roles in the community including chairing Masquerage benefitting Equitas Health in 2015 and taking the lead for Generation Dayton’s GenD Day in 2014. Lauren has also served numerous committee roles with other special events in Dayton including the Alzheimer’s Association’s Longest Day, Paw Patrol’s Foster Program, and Junior League of Dayton. 

When is Beggars Night in your city?

Published: Friday, October 14, 2016 @ 11:20 AM
Updated: Thursday, October 12, 2017 @ 8:44 AM

No Tricks, Just Treats: How to Have a Safe Halloween

It's almost time to gets the kids out for this year’s Beggars Nights (aka trick-or-treating).

It's time to plan your perfect costume, grab a bucket for all of those treats and be adorable. 

>> RELATED: Halloween Guide 2017

We've compiled Beggars Night dates and times in communities across the region.

When is Beggars Night in your community?

>>> FOR KIDS: Halloween fun for the kids all month long

>>> FOR ADULTS: More than 10 of the best Halloween events (for adults)

Groomer gives matted, abandoned dog a much-needed makeover

Published: Saturday, October 14, 2017 @ 12:56 PM

Matted dog groomed at Oviedo BGE Grooming in Florida.
Kari Falla
Matted dog groomed at Oviedo BGE Grooming in Florida.(Kari Falla)

A Florida dog groomer is being praised for her quick work in helping save an abandoned dog in distress.

The groomer’s husband told WFTV's Angela Jacobs on Friday that the dog was found late Wednesday after good Samaritans saved it from being hit by a car along a road in Oviedo.

The dog was so severely matted, the groomer’s husband said, it could barely see through its neglected and overgrown hair. The dog also had to be carried and was unable to walk or wag his tail.

>> Read more trending news

BGE Grooming was contacted due to the dog’s poor condition. The dog groomer, Kari Falla, immediately opened the salon at midnight to begin working on the dog. 

WFTV learned Falla worked on the dog until after 3 a.m. to return its coat to good condition.

A viewer familiar with the incident contacted WFTV and said, “She (Kari) didn't stop there. Today she got with a local vet and they took the dog and they are currently housing and going to find a forever home.”

While the dog undergoes its medical evaluation, Falla reported on her Facebook page that the dog is playing happily with lots of tail-wagging. 

Top Halloween food safety tips

Published: Saturday, October 14, 2017 @ 8:47 AM

How A Teal Pumpkin Can Save A Child’s Life

From bobbing for apples at a party to devouring a bucket of candy, food is definitely a big part of enjoying Halloween. But it can also lead to problems such as food-related illnesses, allergic reactions or even incidents such as choking.

>> Read more trending news


The following top Halloween food safety tips from the FDA  and the CDC will help keep your guests and little ghosts and goblins safe.


Prevent an allergic reaction
If your child has a food allergy, the following can let them enjoy their Halloween haul while avoiding any problematic foods:

Look for teal pumpkins
Families who display teal pumpkins offer non-candy treats for trick-or-treaters who may have allergies.

Check all treats
Make sure your child knows not to eat any candy before you check it at home. Look for ingredient lists on pre-packaged candy, and throw out any homemade treats since you can’t positively identify their ingredients.

Buy treats for your child
Buy some small trinkets (check out the non-candy suggestions listed below) to give your children on Halloween. That way, if they end up not being able to eat much of their candy, they won’t feel left out. 

Exchange or donate what your child can’t eat
Find a local Halloween Candy Buy Back event in your area where kids can exchange candy for cash or prizes. You can also donate candy to active duty service members or other organizations. 

Check for signs of tampering
Although tampering with candy is rare, it does happen. The CDC recommends consuming only factory-sealed food items. Look for any evidence of the following:

  • An unusual appearance
  • Discoloration
  • Tiny pinholes
  • Tears in wrappers

Throw out homemade treats unless they’re from someone you know very well. If something looks suspicious, throw it out, and if you find actual evidence of tampering, notify the police.

Eliminate choking hazards
Some Halloween treats can be choking hazards, especially for small children. Look through their bags to eliminate the following:

  • Peanuts
  • Hard candies
  • Gum
  • Raisins
  • Gooey candy like caramel, taffy or marshmallows
  • Small toys such as balls or marbles
In addition, make sure kids don’t lie down when they’re eating their Halloween candy, since this can increase their risk of choking.

Make sure treats you serve at home are safe
Candy from outside your home isn’t the only possible treat-related danger. If you’re hosting a Halloween party or planning other holiday activities for your family, take the following precautions:

Clean fruit
If you’re bobbing for apples, rinse them thoroughly and use a produce brush.

Avoid raw dough
Don’t eat raw cookie dough or cake batter, which can contain bacteria.

Refrigerate properly
Don’t leave food out on the table or counter for too long. Keep items refrigerated until they’re ready to serve, and don’t leave perishable foods out for more than two hours.

Offer non-food alternatives
You don’t have to limit yourself to handing out candy. Kids enjoy small toys or other treats, and you won’t have to worry about allergies or stuffing them with too much candy. Dollar stores are great places to pick up multiple items packaged together, such as the following:
  • Glow sticks
  • Plastic rings with spiders, skulls, etc.
  • Small bubble bottles
  • Stickers
  • Mini notepads
  • Bouncy balls
  • Pencils
  • Erasers
  • Vampire teeth
  • Temporary tattoos
  • Stencils
  • Silly bands
  • Small playing cards
  • Small cans of Play-Doh
  • Finger puppets

Trick-or-treating: Top safety tips

Published: Friday, October 13, 2017 @ 6:35 PM

No Tricks, Just Treats: How to Have a Safe Halloween

Halloween should be about treats, but some tricks such as dangerous situations can quickly ruin the fun. The following trick-or-treating safety tips can help you and your kids avoid issues.

COSTUME SAFETY
Costumes and other components can create hazards if you’re not careful. The following tips from the Centers for Disease Control and the National Safety Council will help you make sure your child’s disguise doesn’t cause any hazards:

  • Look for light-colored, flame-resistant costumes
    Look for masks, wigs, costumes and other components that are labeled as flame-resistant or made of flame-resistant fabrics such as polyester or nylon. Also choose light-colored costumes when possible since they’re easier for drivers to spot at night.
  • Look for a proper fit
    Make sure all masks, shoes and other parts of your child’s costume fit well. He or she should be able to see well and walk without tripping over a costume that drags the ground or because of shoes that are too large. 
  • Take care with makeup
    Buy only nontoxic Halloween makeup, and always test it in a small area first, the CDC recommends. Remove it before bedtime to help prevent irritation.
  • Use safe accessories
    Use swords, knives and other accessories made of soft materials that won’t cause injury if your child falls on them.
  • Make your child more visible.
    The CDC suggests adding reflective tape to your child’s costume and treat bag to make him or her more visible.
  • Protect their eyes
    Skip wearing decorative contact lenses to avoid injuring your eyes, and don’t let your kids wear them.

ROAD SAFETY

Drive carefully and keep your kids safe as they navigate neighborhood streets with the following tips:

  • Slow down and be cautious
    If you’re driving on Halloween, slow down in residential neighborhoods and watch out for trick-or-treaters who may unexpectedly dart into the street. Especially if they’re wearing dark costumes, they can be difficult to see. 
  • Be visible
    Turn your headlights on, even if it’s still light outside, so you’ll be more visible to trick-or-treaters.
  • Arm trick-or-treaters with flashlight
    Make sure your trick-or-treaters carry a flashlight with fresh batteries, but teach them to carry it facing downward so they don’t temporarily blind oncoming drivers.
  • Stick to sidewalks
    Walk on sidewalks when possible, and if they’re not available, walk on the left side of the road so you’re facing traffic.
  • Cross the street safely
    Cross streets only at the corner, and never cross between parked vehicles.
  • Make sure kids are supervised
    If you’re not accompanying your kids, ensure that they’re going with another adult or an older, responsible young person if they’re under 12. 

    CANDY SAFETY
    Make sure you child’s candy doesn’t cause any harm with the following tips:
  • Inspect your child’s candy
    Tell your kids to wait until you can look through their candy at home before they eat any. Tampering is rare, but it does happen. Look for any tears in wrappers, tiny pinholes, or anything that looks discolored or unusual. Throw out anything that isn’t commercially wrapped, unless it’s a homemade treat from someone you personally know well.
  • Check for allergens
    If your child has a food allergy, read the ingredient label of commercially wrapped treats to make sure it doesn’t contain any allergens. Skip homemade treats, since you can’t be sure of what they contain.
  • Look for teal pumpkins
    If you see a teal pumpkin at a home, that signifies that it’s safe for trick-or-treaters with food allergies since the homeowners offer non-food treats like small toys. Look for homes that display these if your child has allergies, and provide this welcoming sign of safe treats for kids who visit your home.
  • Check for choking hazards
    Check through non-candy treats to make sure they’re not a choking hazard to your child if he or she is younger. Also go through their candy and eliminate any hard candies or any other items they could choke on.
SAFE TRICK-OR-TREAT LOCATIONS
Choose the safest locations for your child to visit with the following tips:
  • Visit ‘trunk or treat’ events
    Organizations such as churches often hold trunk or treat events where people decorate their opened trucks and hand out candy. This helps children stay in a confined area and avoid streets and traffic.
  • Hit the mall
    Malls sometimes have Halloween events where stores give out candy to children in costume. You’ll avoid traffic and other outdoor hazards while ensuring that weather won’t be a factor.
  • Check with neighborhood associations
    If you live in a community with a neighborhood association, these organizations often have information about which houses are handing out candy. The association may also host a clubhouse party for the holiday.
  • Use Nextdoor’s treat map
    The social network site for neighborhoods has a Halloween treat map that lets you and your neighbors “advertise” that you’ll be handing out Halloween candy. You can use it to plan the best route for your trick-or-treaters.
  • Know which houses to avoid
    Several states prohibit registered sex offenders from handing out candy on Halloween, and at least one, Maryland, requires them to post “No candy at this residence” signs. You can also check the U.S. Department of Justice’s website for links to your state’s sex offender registry or download a mobile app that you can use along the way to tell you which homes to avoid.