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Man awakens after bachelor party to find Ray-Bans tattooed on his face

Published: Tuesday, November 03, 2015 @ 9:29 AM
Updated: Tuesday, November 03, 2015 @ 9:29 AM

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A man woke up with more than a hangover after a British bachelor party.

He looked in the mirror to find a pair of glasses permanently tattoed on his face.

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According to The Sun, the man had no memory of getting the tattoo. 

"Waking up the morning after, I thought someone had used a permanent marker on my face," he said. "I had no memory of getting the tattoo because I had gone out celebrating, and when it happened, I was drunk.

"Rayban" was etched along the side of his face between the lines of the tattooed frame.

It's been years since he got the ink.

“When I first came home, obviously I was subject to a lot of stares, but I kind of got used to the tattoo and decided not to get rid of it," he said.

It wasn't until a confrontation during a night out with friends that he began to rethink his decision to keep the tattoo.

“The next morning I really started to think about what my family and friends thought," the man said. “I didn’t want them to be embarrassed when they were out with me, so I decided there and then I was going to get it removed.”

So he went to 1192 Laser and Beauty Clinic in Swansea, South Wales to have the tattoo removed.

The shop's owner, Donnalee Alford, said it was one of the worst tattoos he'd ever seen.

The man completed six treatments to remove the tattoo.

After the treatments, only some temporary turquoise markings remained on the man's face.

"All I can say is that the whole process was amazing," he said. "There is no scarring, and when friends who haven't seen me for months come over, they always notice something is different. When they realize the tattoo is gone, they are shocked about how well the treatment has worked."

“Tattoos have become more and more popular in recent years, but research shows one in six people hate their tattoos and more than half regret having them done in the first place,” Alford said.


New York Times editor calls Yellow Springs ‘one of the best places in the world to visit’

Published: Thursday, December 07, 2017 @ 10:24 AM
Updated: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 @ 4:16 PM

Monica Drake is an assistant managing editor. She oversees new digital features and projects.
Credit: Béatrice de Géa
Monica Drake is an assistant managing editor. She oversees new digital features and projects.(Credit: Béatrice de Géa)

The newest member of the New York Times masthead and the former editor of its travel section thinks rather highly of Yellow Springs, Ohio. 

In fact, Monica Drake insists that the Greene County community is one of the best places in the world to visit, according to a press release from the Times. 

That should come a no surprise. 

Yellow Springs is Drake’s hometown. 

>> RELATED: Five things you have to do in Yellow Springs

She just gave Yellow Springers yet another thing to be proud of. 

It was recently announced that Drake will be overseeing new digital features and projects as The Gray Lady’s assistant managing editor.

Her name will appear with other high-ranking editors listed in the Times’ daily masthead.

New York Times Executive Editor Dean Baquet and the newspaper’s managing editor Joe Kahn said this of Drake in a note to staff members: 

“Having Monica join the masthead is a testament to the importance of her new job and our belief that the Times newsroom should play a leading role in securing our economic future, just as it did in the 1970s when a host of new sections broadened the paper’s appeal. But it is also a tribute to the fact that she is one of our strongest newsroom leaders and should have a voice in our discussions about hiring, promotions and coverage.” 

Drake married Greg Winter, now the newspaper’s deputy international editor, in Yellow Springs in 2006. 

At the time of the wedding, her mother -- Dr. Kathleen Glover, an internist who specializes in reproductive health -- lived in the village. 

Her father, Macarthur Drake, Sr., was an attorney in Gary, Ind. 

>> That time Bradley Cooper hung out with Dave Chappelle in Yellow Springs 

Before assuming her current role, Drake was the New York Times’ senior editor over its travel section.  

In October, she received 9,000 applications from writers hoping to travel to the Times’ 2018 picks for 52 Places to Go.

Before that, she worked on the Time’s culture desk. 

The graduate of Columbia’s journalism school and Yale University joined the newspaper as an intern in 1998 and became a copy editor in 2001. 

>> RELATED: Dayton woman organized event for local restaurant that fired Nazi sympathizer featured in NYT

Drake is set to begin to start Surfacing, “a cross-platform column that will focus on subcultures around the world.”

The newspaper is looking for reporters who can “tell image-driven stories focusing on subcultures using tools like Instagram, Snapchat, photography, video and more” for Surfacing. 

>> ‘Undocumented’ Elf on Shelf post leads some to boycott Beavercreek restaurant

Study says people would rather hang out with their dogs than friends

Published: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 @ 4:00 PM

What Your Dog Is Really Trying To Tell You With Those Heart-Melting Eyes

A new study says that most dog owners would rather spend time with their pup than their friends.

Fox News reported that a study of 2,000 dog owners conducted by smart dog collar company Link AKC says more than half prefer their pet over pals. Owners said they sometimes skip out on social events to be with their dog.

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Eighty-one percent of those surveyed said they spoke to their dog like they would a friend. Single dog owners were twice as likely to talk to their pet about relationship problems. Eighty percent of owners said it’s a deal breaker if their partner didn’t like their dog.

The study found that six in 10 pet owners said their dog takes care of them in some way, with many saying their pet helped them get through a breakup or death of a loved one. 

One study says many dog owners will sometimes skip on social outings with friends to be with their pet.(Astrid Stawiarz/Getty Images for PetHero)

Sixty-two percent of the pet owners surveyed said their dogs helped get them out the house at least twice a day for a walk and more than two-thirds said their dog helps them exercise more regularly.

“The physical benefits of dog ownership are often the first that come to mind, but we’ve found the emotional and mental health benefits of having a furry companion are just as impactful,” Link AKC chief marketing officer Herbie Calves told Fox News. “People consider their dogs members of their family and are looking for ways to connect and interact with them on a deeper level.”

The survey supports Calves’ claim. Fifty-five percent say unconditional love and constant companionship is among the biggest benefit of dog ownership.

“Dog ownership is a great responsibility but also comes with great physical, emotional and mental benefits,” Calves said.

Is feeding a cold a real thing? 5 winter health myths debunked

Published: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 @ 9:00 AM

We separate fact from fiction with the following five winter health myths MYTH: Cold weather can make you get sick FACT: We're more likely to get sick in colder months because we're all cooped up together MYTH: You lose 90 percent of your body heat through your head FACT: You could cover up any other exposed body part and also feel warmer MYTH: You don't need sunscreen in the winter TRUTH: Up to 80 percent of the sun's rays can still penetrate the clouds MYTH: Feed a cold, starve a fever TRUTH: You need t

You've probably heard winter health myths for years and you may have even accepted some of them as fact.

From being told to bundle up, so you don't catch a cold to your neighbor swearing he got the flu from his flu shot, these myths make the rounds every winter.

Breathe easy: 5 household plants that improve air quality

We separate fact from fiction with the following five winter health myths:

Stock photo

Cold weather can make you get sick.

Mom always warned you you'd get sick if you didn't bundle up before heading out in cold weather. Her advice wasn't exactly horrible, since you'll certainly be more comfortable and protected from frostbite. But cold by itself doesn't make you more likely to get sick, according to The Weather Channel. Most experts think we're more likely to get sick in colder months, but that's because we're all cooped up together, exchanging germs. Cold weather also dries out your nasal passages, reducing their ability to filter out infections. Despite evidence to the contrary, moms will probably keep warning their kids to bundle up. It's what they do.

You lose 90 percent of your body heat through your head.

Of all your body parts, your head is more likely to be exposed in cold weather. But that doesn't mean the myth about losing 90 percent of your body heat through your head is true, according to Business Insider. Sure, wearing a hat in cold weather will help you stay warm, but that's just because you're covering an exposed body part, not because there's anything special about your head. You could cover up any other exposed body part and also feel warmer.

You don't need sunscreen in the winter.

If you think you only need sunscreen in hotter weather, you've probably packed your lotion away by the time winter comes around. But even when the weather's overcast in the winter, up to 80 percent of the sun's rays can still penetrate the clouds, according to Reader's digest.

UVA rays are always present - even in winter - and they can damage the deeper layers of your skin, increasing your risk for skin cancer and causing premature aging of your skin. And if you're planning a ski trip, you should be even more careful. UV radiation increases with elevation, and snow reflects and intensifies sunlight. So whatever the season, wearing sunscreen with at least a 30 SPF is the safest way to go.

Feed a cold, starve a fever.

The origin of this myth may be rooted in antiquated beliefs about colds and fevers, according to CNN. It was once believed that your body literally became colder if you had a cold, so it needed to be "warmed up" with food. Fever was thought to need "cooling down" by not eating.

In reality, you need to eat whether you have a cold or a fever. Good, nutritious foods are important, but it's OK if your illness suppresses your appetite a little. Staying hydrated is most important, especially if you have a fever. You may need to replenish electrolytes, so sports drinks can be a good choice. Good ol' chicken soup will keep you hydrated while also helping to clear your nasal passages.

RELATED: Your guide to an (almost) allergy-free home

The flu shot can give you the flu.

This isn't true, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Protection (CDC). Flu shots are made with either an inactive form of the virus or no flu virus at all. Neither type can give you the flu. You may have a sore arm after getting a flu shot and some people report having a low-grade fever and aches for a day or two, but it's not the flu.

On the other hand, you may still get the flu even if you've had a flu shot, but the odds of getting it are much lower and, if you do get the flu, the symptoms will likely be less severe.

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4 drinks that could be sabotaging your weight loss efforts

Published: Tuesday, January 16, 2018 @ 3:01 PM

The following four drinks are some that can sabotage your diet when you're trying to cut calories Juices Coffee with add-ins Alcohol Smoothies

When you're trying to lose weight, you may not give much thought to what you drink, but those calories definitely add up! These "liquid calories" can sabotage your weight-loss efforts, and you may not feel as full as if you'd eaten the same number of calories. Many drinks also provide little to no nutrients and are often loaded with sugar, which can further hamper your weight loss.

»RELATED: Drink up: Black tea helps you lose weight with gut bacteria, study says

These drinks – and their calories – may add up to more than you realize, even on a single day. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offered a sample list of the drinks you may choose during a day in order to total the calories. They started with a morning coffee shop run with a 16-ounce café latte made with whole milk at 265 calories. A non-diet soda with lunch had 227 calories, and an afternoon sweetened lemon iced tea from the vending machine was 180 calories. A glass of non-diet ginger ale with dinner added 124 calories for a daily total of a whopping 796 calories!

The following four drinks are some that can sabotage your diet when you're trying to cut calories:

Orange juice prices could rise as much as $2.30 per gallon, because Hurricane Irma destroyed much of Florida's crop.

Juices

You may think that swapping out sugary sodas for fruit juices is good for your diet, but it may not be as good as you think. Fruit juices are concentrated sources of natural sugar, so they have more calories and don't fill you up as much as fresh, frozen or canned fruits do, according to the Mayo Clinic.

For example, a 20-ounce glass of 100 percent apple juice has 300 calories, and the same portion of 100 percent orange juice has 280, the CDC says.

»RELATED: It's official: Coffee is good for you, according to new research

Coffee

A plain black cup of coffee isn't a calorie problem, according to the Mayo Clinic. It contains fewer than five calories and no fat, but most people need at least a few extras with their coffee, and these also add extra calories.

Although at-home add-ins like creamer and sugar raise the calorie count, a specialty coffee can make it soar. A grande (16-ounce) size of white chocolate mocha espresso at Starbucks has 360 calories. If you choose a venti (20 ounces), you'll be drinking 460 calories.

The sidecar is a classic sour cocktail containing three ingredients: cognac, lemon juice and orange liqueur. CONTRIBUTED BY MARCEL(For the AJC)

Alcohol 

A few drinks after work with your friends or a couple of beers or glasses of wine with a meal can raise your calorie count.

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution previously took a look at some of the calories contained in popular alcoholic beverages and found that five ounces of red wine has about 106 calories, and five ounces of white wine has 100 calories. A regular Budweiser beer comes in at 143 calories, and Bud Light isn't far behind at 110 calories. Cocktails like a four-ounce margarita up the calorie count even higher at 168 calories, and a 4.5-ounce Piña colada packs 245 calories. These counts could vary somewhat depending on the alcohol and sugar content of your specific drink.

The Angel Food smoothie from Smoothie King contains 340 calories for a 20-ounce serving and 690 for 40 ounces.(For the AJC)

Smoothies

Smoothies have a "health halo" that leads many people to believe they're harmless, Marisa Moore, a local dietitian and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, told the AJC.

Serving size is important, she pointed out. For example, a 20-ounce Angel Food smoothie from Smoothie King containing 340 calories. If you order the 40-ounce mixture of strawberries, bananas, nonfat milk, vanilla and other natural flavors and turbinado sugar, you'll be getting a whopping 690 calories. You can save some calories by omitting the sugar, saving 90 calories on a 20-ounce Angel Food smoothie, but it's still fairly high in calories.

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