WEATHER


Breakfast in fast lane

Published: Thursday, July 28, 2011 @ 2:41 PM
Updated: Thursday, July 28, 2011 @ 2:41 PM

Breakfast can be tough. When you're headed out the door to work or trying to get the kids ready for school, it's hard to think of good-for-you breakfasts that can be pulled together quickly.
We know we should eat something, so it's easy to opt for store-bought smoothies and juice drinks and drive-through breakfast sandwiches for the first meal of the day.
The solution? Like so many things, it's getting organized early. Make your breakfast the night before when you're in the kitchen after dinner. Or tackle the job over the weekend and prepare what you need to get through the Monday-through-Friday routine.
First, who says breakfast has to be eggs, cereal or toast? If you'd rather eat a bagel spread with marinara sauce and ricotta cheese, then enjoy. Hummus, shredded carrots and cucumber sticks wrapped in a flour tortilla? A great way to get a head start on your vegetables for the day.
Second, stock up on the right containers. Having containers that are the right size, and sturdy enough to withstand repeated use, makes it that much easier to get out the door with breakfast in hand. Look for cups with gel packs that go in the freezer so your milk and yogurt stay cold and drink containers with built-in mixers so your smoothie will stay smooth.
Third, remember that there's nothing wrong with simple. A banana or an apple with a slice of whole-grain toast may be all you need to get your day off to a good start. Add a protein source like peanut butter, a slice of cheese or a hard-boiled egg and you're good to go.
And as long as you're working on breakfast, how about packing up a little lunch?

Eggs

Boiled eggs are the quintessential breakfast-to-go. Avoid rubbery eggs by using this method to cook them. In a medium saucepan, arrange eggs and add enough tap water to cover the eggs by 1 inch. Bring to a boil, then cover the pan and turn off the heat. Leave the eggs in the water for 10 minutes, then drain and cool. Peel immediately or store in the shell.
Scrambled eggs refrigerate beautifully. You can use whole eggs, or just the whites.
Scramble some eggs and then add some cooked sausage (pork, turkey or veggie). Mix in shredded cheese and salsa and wrap in whole- wheat tortillas to make breakfast burritos. Wrap in foil and refrigerate for up to four days; heat in microwave before you head out the door.
Refrigerate plain scrambled eggs, then in the morning toast an English muffin, top with a slice of cheese and maybe some Canadian bacon, and warm up the eggs for one minute in the microwave. Add them to your muffin and you're on your way in two minutes with a hot sandwich.
Another do-ahead idea uses purchased tubes of pizza dough. Unroll the dough and divide into 8 rectangles. Mix scrambled eggs with shredded mozzarella and marinara sauce and add 1/2 cup to each rectangle. Fold in half, seal the edges and bake at 375 degrees for 10 minutes or until brown. These will keep in the refrigerator for up to four days. Reheat, and again, you have a hot breakfast in two minutes.

Fruit

If you have a minute in the morning, peeled orange sections and sliced apples are easy food to eat on the run. To prepare ahead, chop a mixture into small pieces and toss together with just enough fruit juice to moisten the pieces and keep them from browning. Refrigerate in containers that fit your cup holder and then just grab one as you head out the door. No fork or spoon needed. You just shake the pieces out like you're drinking a milkshake.
Smoothies are a great vehicle for a little fruit and maybe a little dairy. Set up the blender and have your smoothie container ready. Then take one minute in the morning to blend your choice of fruit, juice and yogurt, if you like. Add ice, pour into your cup and go. If you want to make your smoothie ahead of time, skip the ice and it will keep overnight. Using yogurt or bananas gives smoothies a creamy texture.

Cereal and grains

Granola bars are the ultimate in grab-and-go convenience. Make your own and customize with the nuts and dried fruit you and your family like.
Cold cereal is easy to take if you have one of the new containers with a separate compartment for the milk. Try using vanilla yogurt and cut down on the chance of a spill.
Granola itself is easy to make and keeps for weeks. Those same containers with separate compartments make it easy to keep the yogurt cold and the granola crunchy until you're ready to eat.
Instant oatmeal may not be quite as fiber-filled as old-fashioned, but it cooks in seconds. After spending almost $4 for oatmeal at a coffee shop, I realized I could put 1/2 cup instant oatmeal in a microwave-proof container, add 1 cup water, heat for one minute and have the same result at a fraction of the cost. Dress up your oatmeal with brown sugar, chopped nuts or dried fruit.
If you need oatmeal for more than one, try cooking steel-cut oats overnight in a slow cooker. They take about eight hours to reach a creamy texture. Add some sliced apples and a little cinnamon and you've got the breakfast equivalent of apple cobbler.

And finally, bread

It takes just seconds to put bread, English muffins or bagels in the toaster before you head to the shower. Even if you eat it plain, it's better than no breakfast at all, but if you've prepped a few squares of cheese or a boiled egg, you're on your way to a good breakfast. And by the way, cheese freezes fine for a few days, or just cube it and refrigerate wrapped in serving-size packages.

RECIPES

Research says many of us eat breakfast in the car. Here are some ideas for meals you can eat while driving. Not that we'd recommend that, of course.

Individual Omelets
Hands on: 10 minutes Total time: 35 minutes Makes: 12 muffins
This is really great pickup food and infinitely variable. Substitute Canadian bacon or veggie sausage, change the cheese to mozzarella or pepper Jack, or try broccoli or mushrooms, if that's what you like. Use this recipe to make 24 shallow muffins (just put half the amount in each tin) and you'll have thinner omelets that fit neatly inside an English muffin. They'll refrigerate for 5 days. Pop one or two in the microwave until just heated through and head out the door.

  • 1/4 cup chopped green onions, divided
  • 1/4 cup chopped red bell pepper, divided
  • 1 cup 1/4-inch diced ham
  • 3/4 cup grated cheddar cheese
  • 12 eggs
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon pepper

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Thoroughly grease a 12-cup muffin tin with nonstick spray.
Reserve half the green onions and red pepper. In a small bowl, combine the remaining green onions and red pepper and ham. Divide the mixture evenly among the muffin cups. Top each with cheese.
In a medium bowl, whisk together eggs, salt and pepper. Combine thoroughly, then pour egg into each muffin cup. Use a fork to lift vegetables and ham to be sure egg penetrates to bottom of cup. Fill each cup 3/4 full. Bake 20 to 25 minutes, just until muffins have risen and are set.
Remove to a rack to cool. Package in individual servings and refrigerate for up to 5 days, or freeze. If frozen, thaw before reheating. Reheat in microwave for 1 to 2 minutes or until warm in the center.
Per serving: 125 calories (percent of calories from fat, 63), 10 grams protein, 1 gram carbohydrates, trace fiber, 9 grams fat (3 grams saturated), 226 milligrams cholesterol, 351 milligrams sodium.

 

Orange Smoothie
Hands on: 5 minutes Total time: 5 minutes Makes: 1 serving
This smoothie mimics the beloved flavors of beloved Creamsicle ice pops. Smoothies are another quick breakfast option you can customize in many ways. Stick with the basic proportions of 2 cups fruit, 3/4 cup liquid and 1/2 cup yogurt or a half-banana for one serving. If you're using frozen fruit, add that first and allow to thaw for just a few minutes. If you're making a smoothie, when you're ready to serve, add ice cubes to give you that slushy consistence.

  • 2 cups pineapple chunks, fresh or frozen
  • 3/4 cup orange juice
  • 1/2 cup vanilla yogurt
  • In a blender, combine pineapple, juice and yogurt. Process until smooth, adding more juice if thinner consistency is desired. Drink immediately or refrigerate for up to 12 hours.
  • Per serving: 333 calories (percent of calories from fat, 8), 8 grams protein, 73 grams carbohydrates, 4 grams fiber, 3 grams fat (1 gram saturated), 6 milligrams cholesterol, 80 milligrams sodium.

 

Homemade Granola Bars
Hands on: 25 minutes Total time: 55 minutes Makes: 16 bars
These bars get better as they age. They'll keep unrefrigerated for up to two weeks. Use one kind of dried fruit or add a variety. We made ours with dates, dried pineapple and dried cranberries.

  • 2 cups old-fashioned oatmeal
  • 1 cup sliced or slivered almonds
  • 1 cup shredded coconut, loosely packed
  • 1/2 cup untoasted wheat germ
  • 2 tablespoons ground flaxseed
  • 11/2 cups chopped dried fruit
  • 2/3 cup honey
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 11/2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter an 8-by-13-inch baking dish and line with parchment paper. Lightly butter the parchment paper.
In a large bowl, toss together oatmeal, almonds, coconut, wheat germ and ground flaxseed. Spread on a rimmed cookie sheet and bake for 5 to 8 minutes, stirring occasionally, until lightly browned. Transfer mixture back to bowl and mix in dried fruit.
Reduce oven temperature to 300 degrees.
In a 2-cup glass measuring cup, combine honey, butter, vanilla and salt and heat in microwave until butter is melted and mixture just comes to a boil, about 2 minutes. Pour honey mixture over toasted oatmeal mixture in bowl and stir well.
Pour the mixture into the prepared baking dish. Wet your fingers and firmly press the mixture into the pan. Be sure sides are even. Bake for 25 to 30 minutes until light golden brown. Cool for at least 2 hours before cutting into squares. Serve at room temperature.
Adapted from "Barefoot Contessa Back to Basics" by Ina Garten (Clarkson Potter, $35)
Per bar: 209 calories (percent of calories from fat, 38), 5 grams protein, 29 grams carbohydrates, 4 grams fiber, 9 grams fat (3 grams saturated), 4 milligrams cholesterol, 39 milligrams sodium.

 

Banana-Blueberry Muffins
Hands on: 10 minutes Total time: 30 minutes Makes: 12 muffins
Banana and yogurt add sweetness and moisture to this lightened version of the traditional blueberry muffin. If keeping for longer than a day, store muffins in freezer.

  • 1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup whole-wheat flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/3 cup packed light brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup plain yogurt
  • 1/4 cup milk
  • 1 large very ripe banana, mashed
  • 1 large egg
  • 2 tablespoons butter, melted
  • 1 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest
  • 1 cup blueberries, rinsed and picked over

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Lightly grease a 12-cup muffin tin.
In a large bowl, whisk the all-purpose flour, whole-wheat flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt together. In another bowl, whisk together the brown sugar, yogurt, milk, banana, egg, butter and lemon zest. Pour wet ingredients into dry ingredients and stir until just blended. Fold in the blueberries. Be careful not to overmix.
Divide batter evenly among muffin cups. Bake 18 to 20 minutes or until muffins are just firm to the touch. Do not overbake. Cool in pan for 5 minutes; turn out on rack to cool completely.
Adapted from "Go Bananas" by Susan Quick (Broadway Books, $16)
Per muffin: 146 calories (percent of calories from fat, 18), 4 grams protein, 27 grams carbohydrates, 2 grams fiber, 3 grams fat (2 grams saturated), 24 milligrams cholesterol, 272 milligrams sodium.

 

Morning Glory Muffins
Hands on: 20 minutes Total time: 40 minutes Makes: 12 muffins
This slightly decadent breakfast muffin is chock-full of fruit and vegetables and will refrigerate beautifully for up to one week.

  • 1 cup pecans
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup whole-wheat flour
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 3 eggs
  • 1/2 cup vegetable oil
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1 medium apple
  • 2 medium carrots
  • 1/2 cup golden raisins
  • 1/2 cup shredded coconut
Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Lightly grease a 12-cup muffin tin.
On a rimmed baking sheet, spread pecans. Bake until lightly toasted, 5 to 7 minutes. Remove from oven and set aside.
Turn oven up to 400 degrees.
In a large bowl, stir together all-purpose flour, whole- wheat flour, brown sugar, baking powder and cinnamon. In another large bowl, whisk together eggs, oil and vanilla.
In the bowl of a food processor, chop apple and carrots until about the size of rice. Stir apple and carrots into flour mixture; add raisins, coconut and pecans. Pour egg mixture over all and stir together until just combined.
Divide batter evenly among muffin cups. Bake 15 to 18 minutes or until just firm. Cool in pan for 5 minutes; turn out on rack to cool completely.
Adapted from "BakeWise" by Shirley O. Corriher (Scribner, $40)
Per muffin: 301 calories (percent of calories from fat, 52), 5 grams protein, 32 grams carbohydrates, 4 grams fiber, 18 grams fat (3 grams saturated), 53 milligrams cholesterol, 108 milligrams sodium.

Dad surprises son with video of ‘Tooth Fairy,’ watch what happens

Published: Monday, March 13, 2017 @ 6:41 PM
Updated: Monday, March 13, 2017 @ 6:41 PM


            Tinkerbell may not be the Tooth Fairy, but a proud father used a fairy that looked just like her when he made a video of the Tooth Fairy's visit for his son.
            Dan Kitwood/Getty Images
Tinkerbell may not be the Tooth Fairy, but a proud father used a fairy that looked just like her when he made a video of the Tooth Fairy's visit for his son.(Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

A dad who has earned internet fame with a YouTube series featuring his son and movie-quality special effects managed to capture the “Tooth Fairy” on camera when his son lost a tooth.

>> Read more trending news 

 Daniel Hashimoto’s YouTube channel Action Movie Kid features his son James in various adventures of his imagination.

Hashimoto is know for his visual effects work on movies and TV shows. When his son lost his tooth, he set up cameras around his room before bed.

Little James placed his tooth under his pillow that night, and the next morning woke up to find a crystal in its place.

The next morning after breakfast, James and Hashimoto reviewed the footage and were thrilled by what they saw.

Check out Hashimoto’s impressive visual effects work above.

Kids food allergies need extra back-to-school planning

Published: Wednesday, August 15, 2012 @ 1:00 AM
Updated: Wednesday, August 15, 2012 @ 1:00 AM

If you think your kid is fussy about what they eat, you should try packing a lunch when your child has food allergies.

Or in the case of parent Karen Earle's second-grader, multiple food allergies.

"Since she as old enough to understand, we've talked about foods she can have and she cannot have," Earle said.

Earle also make sure to meet with all the teachers and adminstrators before the school year starts and makes sure they have an action plan.

"And her teachers are great about it," Earle said.  "It's never been an issue."

Earle says parents of children with food allergies have to keep the mental and emotional side of the issue in mind, as well as the physical symptoms.

For example, Earle makes sure that she always packs something special in her daughter's lunch, so if kids are celebrating something at the school like a birthday with something her daughter can't eat,  her daughter doesn't feel left out.

"She can still participate," she said.

Getting the school year off to a healthy start

Published: Monday, August 06, 2012 @ 12:00 AM
Updated: Monday, August 13, 2012 @ 7:31 AM

Read King’s blog entries on raising kids at blog.childrensdayton.org.

Summer is winding down, and the school year is quickly approaching.

That means parents must take necessary health precautions to ensure their children are ready to head back to the classroom, according to experts.

We asked Dr. Melissa King, pediatrician and “Dr. Mom” blogger at Dayton (Ohio) Children’s Medical Center, to bring you the facts about everything from physicals to vaccinations for your child.

Q: Back-to-school time is quickly approaching. What do parents need to think about in regards to their children and health before kids head back to the classroom?

A: Have your kids received all required immunizations? Have you discussed with your child’s physician the vaccines that may not be required but are recommended by the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) and AAP (American Academy of Pediatrics)?

Have you filled out any forms that the school has sent home, such as emergency contact and health information forms? Remember to complete all of the parent portions of the form.

Do the school nurse and teachers know about any medical conditions your child may have, particularly food allergies, asthma, diabetes and any other conditions that may need to be managed during the school day? Have you made arrangements with the school nurse to administer any medications your child might need?

Do the teachers know about any conditions that may affect how your child learns? For example, kids with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) should be seated in the front of the room, and a child with vision problems should sit near the board.

 

Q: When should parents start preparing their children for the school year, in regards to health concerns?

A: Starting in July or early August, you should contact your child’s doctor office to set up an appointment. It may take up to six or eight weeks to schedule a physical. Your insurance provider will only pay for one physical every 12 months. However, if you have concerns, problems or chronic health issues, then it is advisable to set up a visit before your child returns to school to discuss any limitations or restrictions.

Q: How often should children get physicals?

A: Annually.

Q: Why are physicals important for children?

A: Physicals are important for children because it is often the only time the child might see a doctor all year. This is a time for the physician or designated health care provider to touch base with both the child and their parent regarding growth issues and any questions they might have. They are also important for students participating in sports, to possibly address any health concerns related to that specific activity. A yearly physical with the same doctor also allows a relationship to be formed, which makes the child feel more comfortable, and the doctor is able to identify medical concerns because they are familiar with the child’s medical history.”

Q: How do vaccinations work?

A: “Vaccinations work by administering a dead or weakened version of the virus to the child. The body is then able to produce antibodies to fight this weakened virus. If you are ever exposed to the real disease, then your body will use the antibodies. … This is called immunity.

Q: Why should children get vaccinations?

A: To protect children from potentially serious or deadly illnesses. We have been pretty successful in the U.S., drastically reducing the incidence of certain illnesses such as mumps, rubella, polio and diphtheria with vaccination campaigns. Unfortunately, there is still more work to be done, and even with the vaccine successes, the absence of an illness in the U.S. does not mean that it is no longer an issue. Even if the virus is no longer present in the U.S., it is still important to get vaccinated to prevent the illness because of travel. There are numerous other countries that still have a high number of cases of vaccine preventable illnesses, and if your child comes into contact with one other person carrying the illness, without a vaccine they could be quickly be affected. There are also children that your child may go to school with who are unable to receive vaccines because of an underlying illness. These children become very vulnerable to an outbreak of an illness. We provide those children with more protection if we are able to vaccinate as many children around them as possible.

Q: What are the potential side effects of vaccinations?

A: Possible side effects include pain, fever, swelling at the injection site, rashes, hives, difficulty breathing and extreme irritability. Some side effects such as encephalopathy (a disease, damage or malfunction of the brain) or Guillain-Barre [syndrome] (a disorder in which the body’s immune system attacks part of the peripheral nervous system) are more serious but luckily more rare as well. I realize that if your child has a severe reaction to a vaccine, then in your world, complications from vaccines are not rare. However, if your child is infected with a vaccine preventable illness and becomes extremely ill or has complications from that illness, then in your world, the risk of infection from an illness that could have been prevented is not rare either. Parents should contact their child’s pediatrician if their child experiences any of these after a vaccine.

Q: What are the common myths about vaccinations? Why are these myths wrong?

A: Myth 1: “Vaccines don’t work.” — This is false. Most occurrences of diseases like polio, diphtheria, tetanus, measles, mumps and now chicken pox have dramatically decreased since the introduction of the vaccines preventing each disease. The numbers of deaths related to influenza and whooping cough have declined as well; however, we still have too many of these cases as well.

Myth 2: “Vaccines aren’t necessary.” — Diseases that are prevented by vaccines still occur in the United States. If a child is not vaccinated against that disease, they are more likely to contract it. High immunization levels explain the dramatic decrease in outbreaks. If children are not properly vaccinated, the immunization level will decline, and outbreaks of the disease will increase. We have seen this occur with various illnesses worldwide when there is some trigger to vaccine avoidance.

Myth 3: “Vaccines aren’t safe.” — While some parents may worry about the side effects of vaccines, it’s important to note that pharmaceutical companies are under the strict supervision of the FDA (Food and Drug Administration). Vaccines are tested for years before they are approved, and all recommended vaccines are considered safe. Observation of vaccines and their safety in children also continues after the vaccine is in use. Anyone can report adverse events related to vaccines at the website vaers.hhs.gov.

Myth 4: “Infants are too young to be vaccinated.” — Many vaccine-preventable diseases strike children under the age of 2, so they are one of the most important groups to vaccinate.

Myth 5: “Vaccines weaken the immune system.” — Natural infections of certain viruses like chicken pox and measles without a doubt weaken the immune system; however, the viruses in vaccines are different from the ‘wild’ virus of the natural infection. Viruses in vaccines have been altered to the point where they will not weaken the immune system.

Myth 6: “Vaccines cause autism.” — This claim has recently been retracted, and there is no longer a link between the MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) vaccine and autism. Studies found that the only connection between these events is age. The MMR vaccine is usually given to children around 15 months old, and the early signs of autism generally begin to show at about 2 years of age.

 

Q: What else should parents know about preparing their children for school health wise?

A: Prepare your children for adequate sleep each night. Discourage TV, computer or telephone use after a specific time in the evening so that children are not distracted by these electronic devices when they should be sleeping. If your child has become a night owl, then you will need to make them wake up a couple of hours earlier each day until they are mimicking their school schedule. Discourage naps.

Encourage your children to eat three meals a day and include milk, fruits and vegetables into their daily intake. Discourage skipping meals at any point in time. Ask your children about their eating habits when they are not with you. Encourage them to drink water.”

Encourage regular, daily exercise for at least one hour every day for your children.

Highlighter hues fuel back-to-school neon trend

Published: Thursday, August 09, 2012 @ 3:16 PM
Updated: Thursday, August 09, 2012 @ 3:16 PM

Neon is a fashion trend that might be best suited to the cool kids — or real kids.

Unlike so many looks that trickled down from designer runways to mass retailers and into teenagers' closets, the almost electrifying shades of pink, green, yellow and orange have been hanging out in high school hallways for a while. And they're back again for the new school year.

"Teens stayed with neon because for them, it's so easy to wear. It taps into youth, emotion and standing out, which they like doing," says Seventeen senior fashion editor Marissa Rosenblum.

The highlighter colors have evolved this season into accessories, beauty products and outerwear. There are still the T-shirts, colored jeans, hoodies and athletic apparel, but Rosenblum says the way to wear neon is as a single bright pop, not head to toe. (It's probably a safe bet that lots of pint-sized athletes will buy into the bright footwear that has made Nike's track and field sneakers one of the most buzzed-about looks of the Olympics.)

"This is the season of color: color on color, color back to neutrals. Neons are just one of the amazing colortrends that are important right now," says Anu Narayanan, vice president of women's merchandising for Old Navy.

She'd like to see mint green jeans with a yellow neon tank with a gray cardigan. "Neon looks best as a surprise within a look."

For its largely grade-school customer, The Children's Place will pair neon with navy as the cooler weather moves in. The brand started introducing neon through bright accents for its summer products but "you'll see even more for the holidays," says TCP senior vice president of design Michael Giannelli. "And it will continue into the spring and probably into next fall. ... We grabbed onto it because we have more freedom in kidswear to play with bright color."

He adds, "The children have a sense of humor about their clothes."

Elena Klam is creative director and co-owner of the jewelry brand Lia Sophia, which is launching a fashion jewelry collection called Sisters aimed at the tween and teen set. It includes neon, preapproved by Klam's teenage daughters and their friends.

"They can be a tough crowd. They're changing all the time, reinventing themselves all the time, trying new things. It's an age of experimentation, but they're also a part of the population who knows what's going on," she says. "They're very savvy."

If everyone is wearing neon, they'll also want it for their accessories, says Klam, adding that schools with strict dress codes will likely allow superbright friendship bracelets or earrings. Her uniform-wearing girls don't get a lot of variety in their school-day clothes, so "they change up their jewelry for a little bit of self-expression."

She expects neon citrus yellow-green to be particularly popular with kids and — as with everything — neonpink. "You don't have to be the 'pink girl' when it's neon. That has a bit of an edge to it," Klam says.

Neon, however, isn't just a chick thing. Giannelli points to the 1980s, when it was a staple in every kid's wardrobe, and he says the skater-snowboarder-surfer look has brought brights back into favor for boys. "Skater kids and surfer dudes are wearing bright pinks and deep purples, and they're also getting into orange and banana."

These colors work surprisingly well in snow gear, particularly fleece, which often is done in one color and trimmed in another, Giannelli says.

Neon hues are probably more traditional for warmer months — and that's what makes them so fresh for fall, says Old Navy's Narayanan. Each year, it seems there are deep shades of brown and purple in stores, but shoppers might not have seen them with a top that has neon pink, she says. "The rules are out the window."

A word of caution, though, from Rosenblum: You might need to be a little more selective about a neon shade than you would a neutral.

"You have to choose the color that looks good on you. That funny off-green is definitely an important color but it's not for everyone. But all the colors for teens are very popular so you can find one."