Recipe: Baked Asparagus With Toasted Walnuts

Published: Monday, February 01, 2016 @ 11:50 AM
Updated: Monday, February 01, 2016 @ 11:50 AM


            Recipe: Baked Asparagus With Toasted Walnuts

Asparagus is more elegant when sprinkled with walnuts and given a hint of lemon. The baking time of the asparagus will vary with the thickness of the spears, tester Jeanne Besser says. When removing the nuts, test and gauge additional time necessary. 

Note: For Rosh Hashana and other holidays, dietary restrictions for Passover need not be observed as noted below. Regular margarine may be used. 

 

Hands on time: 20 minutes  Total time: 45 minutes  Serves: 8

Ingredients:

    4 tablespoons chopped walnuts 
    2 to 3 pounds thin-speared asparagus, woody stems removed 
    Salt and freshly ground black pepper for asparagus and topping, to taste 
    1 tablespoon kosher for Passover margarine, cut into small pieces 
    3 tablespoons walnut oil or olive oil 
    1 1/2 tablespoons lemon juice 

Instructions:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Spread walnuts on a cookie sheet and set aside. Spread asparagus on a separate cookie sheet; sprinkle lightly with salt and pepper and dot with margarine. Bake nuts until aromatic and golden, 8 to 10 minutes. Bake asparagus for 12 to 15 minutes, or until tender but still crisp. 
Meanwhile, in a small bowl, whisk together oil, lemon juice and salt and pepper to taste. Before serving, spoon topping over asparagus and sprinkle with walnuts. -- Adapted from “Fast & Festive Meals for the Jewish Holidays: Complete Menus, Rituals, and 
Party-Planning Ideas for Every Holiday of the Year” by Marlene Sorosky (William Morrow, $27, 1997)

Nutrition:

Per serving (based on 8): 96 calories (percent of calories from fat, 78), 2 grams protein, 3 grams carbohydrates, 1 gram fiber, 9 grams fat (1 gram saturated), no cholesterol, 18 milligrams sodium. 

Toddler with Down syndrome melts hearts on Valentine's Day

Published: Tuesday, February 14, 2017 @ 7:04 PM
Updated: Tuesday, February 14, 2017 @ 7:04 PM


            Toddler with Down syndrome melts hearts on Valentine's Day

The story of a boy with Down syndrome went viral after a local modeling agency rejected him for a clothing ad -- and now, he's melting our hearts even more this Valentine's Day. 

In July, Meagan Nash submitted her son's photos to a talent agency handling a casting call for OshKosh B'Gosh, the popular children's clothing brand owned by children's clothing retailer Carter's. She never heard anything back, and a few months later, she contacted the talent agency. 

>> Read more trending stories

>> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news

The agency told Nash that Asher's photos hadn't even been submitted because OshKosh "didn't specify that they wanted a baby with special needs."  

That didn't sit right -- and the internet took over. 

Related: PHOTOS: Toddler with Down syndrome melts our hearts on Valentine's Day

After Asher's story went viral, an OshKosh B'Gosh representative said, "We have extended an invitation to Asher to participate in an upcoming photo shoot and are excited to include him in our advertising.” 

Now, months later, Asher is still brightening the world with his adorable smile and making everyone wish he was their Valentine.  Photographer Crystal Barbee captured pictures of Asher Nash this Valentine's Day

"I love working with Asher, he's such a happy, loving, sweet little man," Barbee said on Facebook of her photoshoot muse.

Barack and Michelle Obama share sweet Valentine's Day messages to each other

Published: Tuesday, February 14, 2017 @ 4:59 PM
Updated: Tuesday, February 14, 2017 @ 4:59 PM


            Barack and Michelle Obama share sweet Valentine's Day messages to each other

Valentine's Day may be bittersweet for some, but it's filled with love for the Obamas.

Harper's Bazaar reported that the two shared affectionate messages with each other across their social media channels Monday.

>> Read more trending stories

"Happy Valentine’s Day, @michelleobama! Almost 28 years with you, but it always feels new," the former president said in a tweet to Mrs. Obama.

The same message was posted to his Instagram page. Accompanying each message was a photo of Barack Obama leaning into Michelle Obama, who has clasped arms and a beaming smile.

Michelle Obama shared a photo of the two with their feet in the sand, captioning social media posts with, "Happy Valentine's Day to the love of my life and favorite island mate, @BarackObama."

Happy Valentine's Day to the love of my life and favorite island mate, @barackobama. #valentines

A post shared by Michelle Obama (@michelleobama) on

The Obamas were seen vacationing with Virgin Group founder and billionaire Richard Branson in the British Virgin Islands.

The former first couple took a break after leaving the White House and following the inauguration of President Donald Trump.

Waffle House to host romantic Valentine's Day dinner

Published: Thursday, January 28, 2016 @ 8:08 AM
Updated: Thursday, February 09, 2017 @ 12:14 PM


            Waffle House to host romantic Valentine's Day dinner

Trending on Facebook

More popular and trending stories

Candlelight, white tablecloths and ... waffles?

Waffle House is promoting itself as a romantic destination for Valentine's Day, especially for couples who have to stick to a budget. 

>> Read more trending stories  

This year's theme is: "Valentine's Day with BAE" (bacon and eggs.)

Select locations across the country aim to show that bacon, waffles and eggs can be just as romantic as roses and chocolates. The candlelit dinner will include specials along with traditional menu favorites, and plenty of candy.

The special night is expected to be so popular that some locations are accepting reservations.

5 things you didn't know about Groundhog Day

Published: Monday, January 30, 2017 @ 1:09 PM
Updated: Wednesday, February 01, 2017 @ 12:28 PM


            5 things you didn't know about Groundhog Day

The desire to forecast the weather dates back thousands of years. Long before there were meteorologists with state-of-the-art technology for tracking atmospheric patterns, humans have relied on many things -- including furry little critters -- to help them determine changes in the weather and seasons.

>> Read more trending stories  

Thursday, Feb. 2, is Groundhog Day, and according to lore, the groundhog will emerge from his hole after a long winter’s nap. If it’s a sunny day, he’ll become frightened when he sees his shadow and skedaddle back into his burrow for six more weeks of winter. However, if it’s cloudy and he doesn’t see his shadow, it means spring is just around the corner.

Here are five things you may not know about Groundhog Day:

1. The holiday has its roots in the ancient Gaelic festival of Imbolc, held halfway between the winter solstice and the spring equinox. It was the day when a female weather deity called the Cailleach, which means hag, was close to running out of firewood. If she wanted a nice, long winter, she’d make it a bright, sunny day that was good for going outside and gathering lots of firewood. But if it were cloudy, it meant the Cailleach was snug in her bed and sleeping and didn’t need to gather any more firewood because spring was on its way. Over time, Imbolc became Christianized and became St. Brigid’s Day, which was followed by Candlemas on Feb. 2.

2. The first reference to Groundhog Day in America was in 1841 in a diary entry by James Morris, a storekeeper in Morgantown, Pennsylvania. He quoted old poems -- from England, Scotland and Germany -- that equate a sunny Candlemas with a long winter.

3. The modern Groundhog Day tradition, however, really got started in 1887. Clymer H. Freas, a savvy businessman and the editor of the Punxsutawney Spirit newspaper in Pennsylvania, promoted the town’s very own groundhog as the official Groundhog Day meteorologist, thus turning Groundhog Day into a newsworthy event.

4. Groundhogs hibernate over the winter, and the males actually do come out of their burrows in February, interested in lining up future mating partners. They check out the burrows of the lady groundhogs, then go back into their burrows and hibernate until around early March, when it’s time to mate.

5. Groundhogs aren’t the only creatures thought to predict winter. Back in the late 1940s, Charles Howard Curran, an entomologist and the curator of the American Museum of Natural History in New York, began studying woolly bear caterpillars, which are tiger moth in its larvae stage, in early autumn. The woolly bear’s front and end are black, and the midsection is brown. Curran believed the wider the brown band, the milder the winter would be. Present-day entomologists say there’s no science to back up Curran’s claim.