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Things you should put an egg on (or inside)

Published: Tuesday, October 15, 2013 @ 6:20 PM
Updated: Tuesday, October 15, 2013 @ 6:20 PM

Ahh, the humble egg. Few foods out there are as versatile as this inexpensive protein source. These little orbs are filled with nutrients, including lutein and zeaxanthin (essential for healthy eyes!) and omega-3 fatty acids (an important part of keeping hearts healthy) [1] [2]. And while the cholesterol content of egg yolks has caused some controversy, eating as many as four egg yolks per week shouldn't be a problem for most egg-lovers out there. With just 70 calories and 6 grams of protein per egg, incorporating eggs into any meal is an easy way to stay full for hours while also staying healthy.

From baked goods to omelets, pancakes to souflée, the possibilities are truly endless. And then there's one of the most beautiful ways to use an egg: Anything that allows the yolks to run free. Here are 27 recipes starring one of our favorite superfoods (and the best all-natural yellow sauce — the egg yolk)! 

Go ahead, put an egg...

1. In a crepe. 
Thin, buttery crepes make the perfect container for crumbled sausage and bright-yolked eggs in this simple weekend brunch recipe. Forego the sausage in favor of sautéed kale for a meat-free, iron- and calcium-packed version.

2. In multiples, on top of a sandwich.
Okay, so not everyone has quail eggs on hand. But if you did, why not top a chicken-egg sandwich with a dozen or so sunny side-up quail eggs, as in this "WTF Quail Egg Sandwich"? The best part? Runny yolk with every bite!

3. In a roll, baked.
You've likely seen "eggs in a hole" before, but this bready, eggy recipe brings it to another level. Scoop out the inside of a dinner roll, then fill it with an egg. Bake to perfection. Go with a whole-grain roll for added fiber, and serve alongside a bed of healthier salad greens for an easy and healthy brunch.

4. In a cheesy spinach sandwich.
Here’s an easy way to make a batch of sandwiches without too much hassle. A  mixture of eggs, spinach, and cheese gets baked all together and scooped onto rolls when cooked through. Voila! Simple sandwiches. Plus, the spinach-heavy filling is rich with superfood benefits, including a healthy dose of calcium and vitamin K. Make it even healthier by skipping the roll and enjoying the eggs atop fresh greens or on their own.

5. In a baguette for breakfast.
Sure, you’ve probably had eggs on top of baguette slices, but this recipetakes it one step further by placing the egg inside the bread. Opt for a whole-grain baguette for an extra serving of protein and fiber, and enjoy alongside some fresh fruit or a small salad.

6. Baked into an avocado.
Once the pit is removed, the remaining depression in an avocado half is the perfect place to crack an egg. Add some crumbled feta and fresh herbs and serve alongside some whole-grain toast for a healthy, simple, and filling meal.

7. Fried up, on top of some potato and herb hash.
Sure, it’s commonplace to make breakfast potatoes in a cast iron skillet, but the eggs are usually cooked separately and served on top or beside. Not in this simple one-pan dish! After the potatoes are cooked, crack the eggs right in there with the spuds, and sprinkle with a healthy dose of fresh herbs. (Try dill for a Scandanavian twist, oregano and parsley if you’re feeling Italian, or rosemary and thyme for some French flavor.) Aside from fresh flavors, herbs provide health benefits ranging from treating insomnia to providing a healthy dose of antioxidants.

8. In a cup made from bacon.
No frying pan needed here. Make eggs n’ bacon cups by lining a muffin tin with (wait for it) slices of bacon, and cracking an egg in each meat-lined cup. Bake until whites are set and yolks are shining bright, and still a bit liquid in the center. Serve alongside a slice of whole-grain toast or on top of sautéed veggies or greens.

9. Scrambled, in a boat (err… baguette).
Think of this as the quick way of making a scrambled egg sub sandwich. Hollow out sub rolls, fill them with eggs, cheese, and sausage, and bake. You can easily healthify this recipe by choosing a whole-grain roll, cutting back on the egg yolks, and adding some chopped veggies (like onions, peppers, and mushrooms) instead of sausage.

10. On a pizza (for breakfast, lunch, or dinner). 
The best part about pizza is that, when it comes to toppings, pretty much anything goes. This one gets smothered in tomato sauce, bacon, thinly-sliced potatoes, ham, and whole eggs. If you’re not a fan of the double-meat topping, opt for sliced onions and bell peppers instead (You’ll get an extra dose of vitamin C , too!).

11. On top of Huevos Rancheros breakfast pizza.
Topped with beans, cheese, avocado, and eggs, this pizza is nothing to mess with. The eggs and beans provide a healthy dose of protein, whileavocado lends some vitamin E, which is essential for keeping our cells healthy and functioning properly. 

12. In quail form, on top of a roasted red pepper crostini.
This recipe can’t get simpler. Toast some baguette slices. Top with roasted red peppers (from a jar, or homemade), and top that with a fried quail egg.

13. Poached, atop a quinoa salad. 
Packed with protein and fiber, quinoa (one of our favorite superfoods) makes a great base for just about anything — especially in this salad. Toss it with some baby greens, sautéed mushrooms, and goat cheese, and top it with a poached egg or two, and you have a healthy, meat-free, and super-filling meal perfect for lunch or dinner. The runny yolk makes the quinoa mixture even more delicious.

14. In a baked potato.
This author has endless ideas regarding where to stick eggs. In fact, she wrote a cook book devoted to it! (Check it out here: Put an Egg on It: 70 Delicious Dishes That Deserve a Sunny Topping!) The sunny-side-up-topped baked potato makes a great breakfast, or breakfast-for-dinner. Garnish with chopped bacon, plain Greek yogurt, and green onions, or go full veggie-mode and whip up a mixture of greens or other seasonal veggies (Brussels sprouts would be great!) to stick beneath the egg. 

15. Smushed on a juicy burger.
No recipe needed for this one. The best burger topping (probably ever)? An over-easy egg, of course. Press the second half of the bun on top, and watch the yolk run down the sides. Keep in mind that this works equally well for beef, turkey, veggie, and basically any other type of burger. The health benefit? This one’s more about happiness, people.

16. On top of rainbow chard, potato, and pesto hash.
It might not get healthier than this take on the classic breakfast hash. Instead of greasy meat, the base of this hash is a few potatoes and heaps of rainbow chard, all flavored with a fresh chard and cashew pesto. (Can you say yum?) Both the hash and pesto use the Swiss chard stems, which studies show contain glutamine, an amino acid that helps boost the immune system [3].

>> For the full list of 27 things to put an egg on (and inside), go to Greatist.com.



Here’s how much fruit juice children should drink, according to new guidelines

Published: Monday, May 22, 2017 @ 12:19 PM



KidStock/Getty Images/Blend Images

Next time you're grocery shopping for your kids, think twice before adding a carton of fruit juice to your basket. The American Academy of Pediatrics has updated its guidelines on all juices, advising parents to pull back on how much they serve their little ones.

» Related: What Atlanta dietitians feed their kids 

Previous recommendations said parents should wait to give their babies juice until after six months, but its latest update is suggesting that they wait one year. 

In fact, infants should only be fed breast milk or infant formula for the first six months. After six months, moms and dads can then introduce fruit to their diet, but not fruit juice. 

>> Read more trending news

“Parents may perceive fruit juice as healthy, but it is not a good substitute for fresh fruit and just packs in more sugar and calories,” said Melvin B. Heyman, MD, FAAP, co-author of the statement. “Small amounts in moderation are fine for older kids, but are absolutely unnecessary for children under 1.”

» Related: Should we slap a tax on sugary drinks? 

Scientists laid out instructions for older children, too. Toddlers who are ages 1 to 4 should only have one cup of fruit a day. Four ounces of that can come from 100 percent fruit juice, but it should be pasteurized and not labeled “drink,” “beverage” or cocktail.” 

For children ages 4 to 6, fruit juice intake shouldn't exceed four to six ounces a day. 

The amount increases just slightly for children ages 7 to 18. They can have up to two and a half cups of fruit servings, but only eight ounces of it should be juice. 

Top 15 crusaders for health in America's food industry

Published: Tuesday, June 25, 2013 @ 10:59 PM
Updated: Tuesday, June 25, 2013 @ 10:59 PM

Wondering how this year's list stacks up against the last? Check out Top 15 Crusaders for Health in the Food Industry 2012.

Amongst all the junk food commercials and donut sandwiches, there are a handful of health heroes. These aren’t just people who eat organic greens for lunch and free-range eggs for dinner; they’re moving and shaking the way we think about our food, including where it comes from, the implications it has on our environment, and what our meals mean for our bodies. Here, we recognize 15 superstars (in no particular order) that have devoted themselves to improving American’s relationship with food.

 

1. Marion Nestle
Nestle has got her hand in nearly every facet of America’s food industry. Her blog, Food Politics, covers topics from nutrition and biology to health policy and food marketing. She’s been teaching nutrition for nearly four decades and currently teaches sociology, food studies, and public health at NYU. Nestle is the author of many books, but her latest — “Why Calories Count: From Science to Politics” — is all about understanding the intersection of health and food amidst all the mass marketing and misinformation put forth by major food manufacturers. Currently, Nestle updates her blog regularly and presents at universities and conferences on topics such as genetically modified foods and the role food companies play in our food system. (Photo: www.foodpolitics.com)

 

2. Michael Pollan
As one of the foremost activists for change in the overwrought food industry, Pollan is an outspoken and often controversial figure in the food and farming space. Though probably best known for his book “The Omnivore’s Dilemma” (which hung out on The New York Times Bestseller list for more than three years), Pollan has continued to write. In his most recent book, “Cooked”, Pollan explores how cooking connects us to plants, animals, farmers, and culture (amongst other things). (Photo by Ken Light)

 

3. Michelle Obama
After launching the Let’s Move! campaign at the start of 2010, the First Lady has made healthifying America’s eating habits (especially for kids) her job. The ultimate goal is to eliminate childhood obesity and help kids live healthier lives with good food and a little extra physical activity. This year, Obama held the second annual “Healthy Lunchtime Challenge,” where she asked children ages eight to 12 to whip up nutritious, tasty, and affordable recipes. Unfortunately, we weren’t invited to the White House kids’ “State Dinner” with the winner of this year’s challenge. (Photo: www.whitehouse.gov)

 

4. Mark Bittman
As an author and New York Times writer,Bittman likes to weigh in on what’s wrong with the American diet. A part-time veganhimself, Bittman is an advocate for the “flexitarian” diet — which means eating vegan during the day, but allowing for more flexible consumption after 6 pm. His super popular book, “How to Cook Everything”, is a go-to resource for basic kitchen skills. Not only does he push for humans to stay healthy, Bittman relentlessly encourages us to keep the environment happy and healthy, too. Oh, and in his spare time, he runsmarathons(Photo: www.markbittman.com)

 

5. Mike Bloomberg
As the mayor of New York City, Bloombergtakes his role seriously, making waves in the name of public health. From smoking bans tosoda bans, Bloomberg’s initiatives aren’t without controversy and backlash. Passionate about combating obesity, he’s pushed for salad bars and healthier menus in school cafeterias. Plus, he’s managed to eliminate trans fats from tons of restaurant items, and make it mandatory for chain restaurants to clearly post calorie counts on menus. We’re excited to see what goals Bloomberg sets (and reaches) next. (Photo: www.nyc.gov)

 
For the full list of 2013's top health crusaders in the food industry, go to Greatist.com.

Turns out social media can make exercise contagious

Published: Saturday, May 13, 2017 @ 6:53 PM

We love a good workout buddy. You know, that ride-or-die friend who gives you an extra dose of motivation to roll out of bed for a 6 a.m. boot camp class. But what about those of us who’d rather sweat solo? Good news: You don’t necessarily need to work out with your friends to tap into the benefits, just as long as you have friends in your circle who work out.

»RELATED: 30 minutes of daily exercise enough to shed pounds

As it turns out, exercise is kind of contagious. That’s the conclusion from a recent study published in the journal Nature Communications, which incorporated five years of data from about 1.1 million runners. That length of time and large sample size means the study is legit; however, there’s one hiccup: The study participants don’t exactly represent the population as a whole, since the data came from a particularly fit subset consisting of people who run and wear fitness trackers. Still, the findings are interesting.

Participants used an app with social sharing abilities so their friends could see the details of every run they went on (and vice versa). Researchers found the social media snooping served as motivation to get moving. If runner 1 ran an extra .62 miles, runner 2 felt inspired to run more too. And if runner 1 ran 10 minutes longer, runner 2 would go for a few extra minutes. The influence was strongest most immediately and seemed to cool over time. For example, runners were more influenced by what their friends did that day than by what they did three days ago.

The "contagiousness" of exercise wasn’t the same for everyone across the board. The correlation was strongest between men. Women also influenced guys, but to a lesser extent, and only women felt the positive peer pressure from other women.

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So does this mean that most of us push ourselves harder to compete with those who are more athletic than us? Or are we more motivated to maintain our dominance over the people we’re better than? Researchers found both upward and downward comparisons at play, but the latter—the downward comparison—was stronger.

What does this mean IRL? Having friends who are healthy and fit (and willing to share the deets about what they do to remain healthy and fit) could give you extra incentive to exercise. “Who are the people you can surround yourself with who are going to push you to do better?” says Christian Koshaba, founder, CEO, and lead trainer at Three60Fit in Arlington Heights, Illinois. “You don’t have to be physically there together—it can be calling each other, sharing your Fitbit data, really anything that’ll push you like, ‘Oh there’s that number? Now I’m going to do better than that.’” 

Just make sure you find friends who are around the same fitness level as you. The study's researchers found competing on a close-to-level playing field had the strongest influence. Plus, trying to compete with someone who’s out of your league could backfire if you end up injured, Koshaba says. In general though, “the positives outweigh the negatives when you’re striving to be better,” he says.

Of course, to make the findings of this study work for you, you have to be willing to share your stats. Koshaba says some of his clients track how much they’re lifting and how fast they’re running in a shared Google doc. Or you can embrace the social features of your favorite exercise apps so you know how you measure up. Here are three we’re fans of:

  • Nike+ Run Club: Pace, elevation, heart rate, splits—all of your stats are logged within the app. Follow up the workout by sharing your run (plus any photos you took along the way) with your entire social network or just with those within your Nike+ circle. The app’s leaderboard feature also lets you tag your miles against challenges to see where you stand.
  • Runkeeper: Start a virtual running group (which is easy to do, thanks to this app’s community of 50 million runners) and knock out the running goals you set as a team, such as running twice a week for one month.
  • Strava: Your workout will be recorded on your Strava feed, where friends can cheer you on and where you can see what others are up to. That’ll come in handy on those days when you’re tempted to skip the workout altogether.

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The Bottom Line

At the end of the day, it's cool to look into the science behind something that's so relevant and relatable, but it all comes down to what motivates you. Posting about fitness on social media isn't always vain; it's an easy and accessible way to hold yourself accountable and give or get inspiration to move. If you're the type of person who's motivated by competition or numbers, great! But if following your friends' fitness habits turns toxic, causes you to compare yourself in a negative way, or makes you feel bad about your own performance, then it's time to unfollow for your own good.

Related

VIDEO: This is how colorblind people see the world

Published: Monday, May 01, 2017 @ 10:37 AM



Ian Waldie/Getty Images

Approximately one in 12 men and one in 200 women in the world are colorblind, according to the Colour Blind Awareness organization.

>> Read more trending news

Though colorblind people are usually able to see things as clearly as everyone else, they’re unable to fully see red, green or blue light, according to the Colour Blind Awareness website.

Business Insider put together a video using Colblindor’s online color blindness simulator to show you how people who are colorblind see the world.