Things you should put an egg on (or inside)

Published: Tuesday, October 15, 2013 @ 6:20 PM
Updated: Tuesday, October 15, 2013 @ 6:20 PM

Ahh, the humble egg. Few foods out there are as versatile as this inexpensive protein source. These little orbs are filled with nutrients, including lutein and zeaxanthin (essential for healthy eyes!) and omega-3 fatty acids (an important part of keeping hearts healthy) [1] [2]. And while the cholesterol content of egg yolks has caused some controversy, eating as many as four egg yolks per week shouldn't be a problem for most egg-lovers out there. With just 70 calories and 6 grams of protein per egg, incorporating eggs into any meal is an easy way to stay full for hours while also staying healthy.

From baked goods to omelets, pancakes to souflée, the possibilities are truly endless. And then there's one of the most beautiful ways to use an egg: Anything that allows the yolks to run free. Here are 27 recipes starring one of our favorite superfoods (and the best all-natural yellow sauce — the egg yolk)! 

Go ahead, put an egg...

1. In a crepe. 
Thin, buttery crepes make the perfect container for crumbled sausage and bright-yolked eggs in this simple weekend brunch recipe. Forego the sausage in favor of sautéed kale for a meat-free, iron- and calcium-packed version.

2. In multiples, on top of a sandwich.
Okay, so not everyone has quail eggs on hand. But if you did, why not top a chicken-egg sandwich with a dozen or so sunny side-up quail eggs, as in this "WTF Quail Egg Sandwich"? The best part? Runny yolk with every bite!

3. In a roll, baked.
You've likely seen "eggs in a hole" before, but this bready, eggy recipe brings it to another level. Scoop out the inside of a dinner roll, then fill it with an egg. Bake to perfection. Go with a whole-grain roll for added fiber, and serve alongside a bed of healthier salad greens for an easy and healthy brunch.

4. In a cheesy spinach sandwich.
Here’s an easy way to make a batch of sandwiches without too much hassle. A  mixture of eggs, spinach, and cheese gets baked all together and scooped onto rolls when cooked through. Voila! Simple sandwiches. Plus, the spinach-heavy filling is rich with superfood benefits, including a healthy dose of calcium and vitamin K. Make it even healthier by skipping the roll and enjoying the eggs atop fresh greens or on their own.

5. In a baguette for breakfast.
Sure, you’ve probably had eggs on top of baguette slices, but this recipetakes it one step further by placing the egg inside the bread. Opt for a whole-grain baguette for an extra serving of protein and fiber, and enjoy alongside some fresh fruit or a small salad.

6. Baked into an avocado.
Once the pit is removed, the remaining depression in an avocado half is the perfect place to crack an egg. Add some crumbled feta and fresh herbs and serve alongside some whole-grain toast for a healthy, simple, and filling meal.

7. Fried up, on top of some potato and herb hash.
Sure, it’s commonplace to make breakfast potatoes in a cast iron skillet, but the eggs are usually cooked separately and served on top or beside. Not in this simple one-pan dish! After the potatoes are cooked, crack the eggs right in there with the spuds, and sprinkle with a healthy dose of fresh herbs. (Try dill for a Scandanavian twist, oregano and parsley if you’re feeling Italian, or rosemary and thyme for some French flavor.) Aside from fresh flavors, herbs provide health benefits ranging from treating insomnia to providing a healthy dose of antioxidants.

8. In a cup made from bacon.
No frying pan needed here. Make eggs n’ bacon cups by lining a muffin tin with (wait for it) slices of bacon, and cracking an egg in each meat-lined cup. Bake until whites are set and yolks are shining bright, and still a bit liquid in the center. Serve alongside a slice of whole-grain toast or on top of sautéed veggies or greens.

9. Scrambled, in a boat (err… baguette).
Think of this as the quick way of making a scrambled egg sub sandwich. Hollow out sub rolls, fill them with eggs, cheese, and sausage, and bake. You can easily healthify this recipe by choosing a whole-grain roll, cutting back on the egg yolks, and adding some chopped veggies (like onions, peppers, and mushrooms) instead of sausage.

10. On a pizza (for breakfast, lunch, or dinner). 
The best part about pizza is that, when it comes to toppings, pretty much anything goes. This one gets smothered in tomato sauce, bacon, thinly-sliced potatoes, ham, and whole eggs. If you’re not a fan of the double-meat topping, opt for sliced onions and bell peppers instead (You’ll get an extra dose of vitamin C , too!).

11. On top of Huevos Rancheros breakfast pizza.
Topped with beans, cheese, avocado, and eggs, this pizza is nothing to mess with. The eggs and beans provide a healthy dose of protein, whileavocado lends some vitamin E, which is essential for keeping our cells healthy and functioning properly. 

12. In quail form, on top of a roasted red pepper crostini.
This recipe can’t get simpler. Toast some baguette slices. Top with roasted red peppers (from a jar, or homemade), and top that with a fried quail egg.

13. Poached, atop a quinoa salad. 
Packed with protein and fiber, quinoa (one of our favorite superfoods) makes a great base for just about anything — especially in this salad. Toss it with some baby greens, sautéed mushrooms, and goat cheese, and top it with a poached egg or two, and you have a healthy, meat-free, and super-filling meal perfect for lunch or dinner. The runny yolk makes the quinoa mixture even more delicious.

14. In a baked potato.
This author has endless ideas regarding where to stick eggs. In fact, she wrote a cook book devoted to it! (Check it out here: Put an Egg on It: 70 Delicious Dishes That Deserve a Sunny Topping!) The sunny-side-up-topped baked potato makes a great breakfast, or breakfast-for-dinner. Garnish with chopped bacon, plain Greek yogurt, and green onions, or go full veggie-mode and whip up a mixture of greens or other seasonal veggies (Brussels sprouts would be great!) to stick beneath the egg. 

15. Smushed on a juicy burger.
No recipe needed for this one. The best burger topping (probably ever)? An over-easy egg, of course. Press the second half of the bun on top, and watch the yolk run down the sides. Keep in mind that this works equally well for beef, turkey, veggie, and basically any other type of burger. The health benefit? This one’s more about happiness, people.

16. On top of rainbow chard, potato, and pesto hash.
It might not get healthier than this take on the classic breakfast hash. Instead of greasy meat, the base of this hash is a few potatoes and heaps of rainbow chard, all flavored with a fresh chard and cashew pesto. (Can you say yum?) Both the hash and pesto use the Swiss chard stems, which studies show contain glutamine, an amino acid that helps boost the immune system [3].

>> For the full list of 27 things to put an egg on (and inside), go to Greatist.com.



Doctor takes to Facebook in search for new kidney

Published: Monday, October 23, 2017 @ 12:47 PM

Dr. Stuart Himmelstein is searching for a new kidney. Himmelstein has spent five years on dialysis. He is talking to the press and on his Facebook page, "New Kidney for Stu." "I am hopeful my walking angel is out there," he said.

Dr. Stuart Himmelstein has spent every night of the past five years on dialysis. Since learning he had a rare form of kidney disease, the primary care physician with a private practice in Delray Beach has been on the deceased donor transplant list with no success. So he decided to create a Facebook page titled "New Kidney for Stu." 

Himmelstein, who started the page in June 2016, has been getting a surge in likes on his page after a local news station recently ran a segment on his plight. "Since the segment aired, 19 people have reached out to contact me about my quest for a kidney," he said. "I was diagnosed in 2012 with tuberous sclerosis, which is a congenital abnormality. The sooner I get a kidney, the better. My energy levels are definitely down and if I'm healthier, I can continue to help others."

Having to explain to his 90-year-old mother that he needs a kidney is heart-wrenching for Himmelstein, who has been practicing medicine for 30 years and is affiliated with Delray Medical Center. "I have had the sweetest people including an 85-year-old man try to help me find a kidney," he said. "I have to help my own mother understand why she can't give her baby a kidney." 

His sister works in Manhattan, and he said friends and relatives in New York have been trying to share his Facebook page. "Anyone who potentially wants to be a donor has to undergo a screening process," Himmelstein, 58, said. "I've gotten close a few times where a donor was going to give me a kidney but then they had to back out for personal or medical reasons." 

His friend Mary Milchikier is also trying to help him spread the word. Milchikier, an employee at Delray Medical Center, donated a kidney to her brother-in-law. Milchikier said she wishes she was born with three kidneys so she could give one to Himmelstein. 

"My husband had to have a liver transplant so I am very familiar with the donor and recipient process and I learned everything I could about transplants," Milchikier said. "My husband received his liver transplant through a woman who was in a tragic car accident, but my brother-in-law needed a kidney and couldn't find a donor, so I volunteered to give him mine." While a healthy person can live a normal life with just one kidney, she must now make sure she drinks at least of two liters of water a day and monitors her sugar and protein intake. "I have a special place in my heart for those in need of organ transplants and I really hope Stu gets a kidney," Milchikier said. "I wanted to pay it forward after everything I watched my husband go through." Himmelstein said most of the organ transplant donors he's met have a positive outlook on it, as Milchikier does. "Mary is so positive about her donation and has this eternal positivity," he said. "I am hopeful my walking angel is out there."

Embracing Life On Cancer’s Journey

Published: Monday, October 23, 2017 @ 11:50 AM


            Brenda Frey, a breast cancer survivor from Houston in Shelby County. CONTRIBUTED
Brenda Frey, a breast cancer survivor from Houston in Shelby County. CONTRIBUTED

Brenda Frey said her breast cancer journey has been energized by the power of prayer and a positive outlook.

It’s also been enhanced by those with whom she has interacted at Upper Valley Medical Center’s Cancer Care Center, where she received chemotherapy and radiation in 2014.

While discussing her diagnosis and treatment, the resident of the Houston area in Shelby County sported a T-shirt reflecting part of her philosophy. It read: “Life isn’t easy. Life isn’t perfect. Life is good.”

“It is hard. Life is hard,” Frey said. “You have to work at it, just like you have to work at a marriage. You just can’t sit back and let others do everything for you.”

Frey was in recovery from a 2012 stroke, learning how to walk and talk again, when her cancer was diagnosed in late 2013.

“I knew it was breast cancer before I went in. This had been growing in my chest,” she recalled. “I was standing in front of the mirror. I told my husband, ‘I think I had better go in. It is getting worse.’”

After her diagnosis and surgery at St. Rita’s Medical Center in Lima, Frey told her doctor it was too far to drive to Lima for treatments. At the recommendation of a relative, she asked for referral to Upper Valley and oncologist Mohan Nuthakki, M.D.

Among Frey’s first stops was a cancer class in which a nurse addressed four cancer patients as a group and then their specific form of cancer as well as what to expect during treatment. Frey was no stranger to cancer; it had killed her mother and maternal grandparents. Still, she had many questions.

She, like other cancer patients, became a regular at the Cancer Care Center, first receiving chemotherapy and then radiation treatments.

“The longer you go, the more you get to know people,” Frey said. She and husband, Tom, came to know the staff well along with other patents. “I enjoyed watching people and meeting people. Some people loved talking to you. I love to listen,” she said.

Tom, who she called her “biggest cheerleader,” befriended Cancer Care Center janitors, she said.

Frey said her faith gave her strength during treatment, and beyond, along with a positive attitude.

She took advantage of the hospital’s amenities for cancer patients, including the Cancer Care Center’s massage therapy services.

“My body is a thing of pain, but I deal with it. If you tell me what is wrong, I can deal with it,” she said. “People need to know their body. When something’s not right, doesn’t seem right, bring it up to the doctor.”

Self-advocacy also is important, Frey said. “You have to be your own advocate. You have to make sure that your questions, your concerns are addressed,” she said. “A question is not dumb. It is dumb if you don’t ask it. Write the questions down.”

A comfort level with the doctor is key. “At Upper Valley Medical Center, you are more than just a number. You are a person. To me, that makes a difference. They have great oncology, radiology departments,” Frey said.

People also need to be aware of local treatment options and consider them, if they can meet the individual patient’s needs, she said.

Frey would like to see more survivors. “But to see more, people need to have their mammograms, their colonoscopies, their prostate checks,” she said.

Dr. Nuthakki said Frey did well overall with her Stage 2 breast cancer treatment coupled with other health problems. She progressed through treatment, now is on oral medication and has a strong support system through her husband, he said.

“She is doing well. When you see her, your heart thinks, ‘Why do they have so many problems?’ Yet, she is upbeat. She is very positive,” he said. “Sometimes when I get down looking at all the problems, she lifts your spirits up. She is that kind of person.”

15 things everyone battling cancer must do

Published: Saturday, October 21, 2017 @ 6:00 AM

On July 14 — two days before her double mastectomy and the day before her son, Kier Dorman of Cincinnati, was deployed — the pair went skydiving at Start Skydiving, 1711 Run Way, in Middletown, Ohio. CONTRIBUTED
Contributing Writer
On July 14 — two days before her double mastectomy and the day before her son, Kier Dorman of Cincinnati, was deployed — the pair went skydiving at Start Skydiving, 1711 Run Way, in Middletown, Ohio. CONTRIBUTED(Contributing Writer)

To those embarking on the cancer journey, know there is hope. You will find strength you never knew you had. You will grow in patience, love, faith and gratitude. You’ll learn what’s truly important and how to more deeply savor every moment. You will inspire others to do the same.

>> PERSONAL JOURNEY: The gift of cancer: Why I’ve never been luckier 

 Here are 15 things I’ve learned in my journey that I share with you — 15 things everyone with cancer should know and do.

1. Laugh — a lot. 

Humor can increase the antibody IgA (immunoglobulin A), helping fight disease. Vigorously amuse yourself. The boob jokes never got old. Neither did the hair jokes. At one point during chemo, I looked like Powder, that bald, pale-faced kid with ESP from the ʼ90s movie. I now have super-short hair, and the easiest Halloween costume ever: Eleven from “Stranger Things.” 

2. Cry — a lot. 

This is a wild and emotional ride. Peer support from the women I met through the Noble Circle Project helped immensely, and I’m still seeing a therapist. Writing in my journal also helped me unpack and process the many feelings, some of them surprising, that arose.

3. Know that everything is going to be OK. 

Call on your faith, beliefs, support network and everything that will help you stay positive and focused on healing.

4. Accept and appreciate your journey for what it is.

No one’s is the same. Be kind and patient with yourself and understand your body will heal in its own time.

Friends wore bald head caps from Foy’s costume store during Kristen Wicker’s head-shaving shindig at Derailed Hair Salon in the Oregon District. Pictured left to right: Katie Wedell, Alexis Larsen, Anthony Shoemaker, Kristen Wicker, Amelia Robinson, Mindy Finch, Amy Forsthoefel. CONTRIBUTED(Contributing Writer)

5. Rally your crew. 

One of my BFFs set up an account on Lotsa Helping Hands to organize a meal train, flower brigade and other opportunities to help me out, as well as give updates on my progress. When people offer to help, make sure you have their contact info — and don’t be shy about calling upon them. People truly want to help you, and it brings them joy to do so. It’s a win-win.

6. Gather your caregivers. 

Identify your primary non-physician caregivers, such as a spouse, partner or friend. Provide them with your physicians’ contact information, a schedule of your appointments and details about your type of breast cancer so if you go down, they can step up with all the info they need in hand.

Kristen Wicker (right) shortly after going bald and her partner and primary caregiver, Matthew Leclaire, at home in Dayton. CONTRIBUTED(Contributing Writer)

7. Plan your coming out. 

Decide with your family how to tell others about your diagnosis. I had my hair cut short and when people complimented me, I’d say something like, “Wait until you see my wigs” as a way to lightheartedly break the news. Once my family knew, I posted something on social media — with a plea for all women to check their breasts and get regular mammograms.

8. Consider a fundraiser. 

I was resistant to this idea at first, but one of my BFFs created a Go Fund Me campaign and it’s been a lifesaver when it comes to those medical bills. Breast cancer is a very expensive venture.

9. Be your own best advocate. 

You are in charge of your body and care. The human body and medicine are so complex, there’s no way every doctor can know every single thing. Do your own research on credible websites and read books by those with the best credentials. I spent a lot of time researching, asking about and trying such complementary therapies as massage, acupuncture, aromatherapy, meditation, yoga, nutrition, supplements and the Qigong I learned through Noble Circle. You also can get a temporary handicap parking tag if you develop mobility issues.

>> 10 things that truly helped me through my cancer journey

10. Get organized. 

Even if you just put stuff in a pile and sort through the details later, keep all your medical bills and records in one place. You might have a nurse navigator who can help walk you through the journey as well. You’ll be loaded up with a lot of information at your first appointment. Don’t get overwhelmed: Call on your support network to help you sort through and read everything.

11. Be patient with and love on yourself. 

I had to drop all volunteer work, which was difficult for me to do. But I now know there’s no way I could have kept up. Your No. 1 job now is healing.

12. Ask lots of questions. 

Do your homework before doctor’s appointments and come with a list of questions. Lists of suggested questions are on breast and other cancer websites. Always ask, “What can I do to help myself?” Take notes at each appointment and record your conversation with your docs. Bring one or two family members or friends along to milestone appointments. They often think of questions you’re too overwhelmed to imagine and remember things you forget.

13. Keep a journal. 

Whether verbal or written, digital or on paper, this is a good place to take notes from appointments and keep a list of medications, vitamins and supplements. Mine included blood pressure readings, daily notes about how I felt, poems and emotional purges.

14. Eat well and exercise.

It can be a struggle to get out of bed some days, but keep physically active as much as possible. Take advantage of available fitness resources. Focus on eating a healthy, whole food diet, avoiding sugar and processed foods.

15. Create a morning ritual of hope. 

Even on the days when I felt like dog poo, I tried to start with a positive affirmation or prayer. Sometimes, that was simply telling myself, “I’m going to have the best day possible and love myself today.”

Contact contributing writer Kristen Wicker at kristenmariawicker@gmail.com.”

10 things that truly helped me during my cancer journey

Published: Saturday, October 21, 2017 @ 6:00 AM

Friends wore bald head caps from Foy’s costume store during Kristen Wicker’s head-shaving shindig at Derailed Hair Salon in the Oregon District. Pictured left to right: Katie Wedell, Alexis Larsen, Anthony Shoemaker, Kristen Wicker, Amelia Robinson, Mindy Finch, Amy Forsthoefel. CONTRIBUTED
Contributing Writer
Friends wore bald head caps from Foy’s costume store during Kristen Wicker’s head-shaving shindig at Derailed Hair Salon in the Oregon District. Pictured left to right: Katie Wedell, Alexis Larsen, Anthony Shoemaker, Kristen Wicker, Amelia Robinson, Mindy Finch, Amy Forsthoefel. CONTRIBUTED(Contributing Writer)

When folks learned I’d been diagnosed with breast cancer, their first response was almost always to offer help. Not everyone diagnosed knows what she might need or wants help from others — but I did. One of my BFFs joked I was going to become too lazy to ever do anything for myself again. I fear that may have actually happened.

Here are some things that helped me and ideas for how you can help others during a breast cancer journey.

1. Visit.

It gets lonely when you’re home sick, especially after the initial surge has waned. Indeed, the feelings of isolation and missing out were perhaps the most difficult part of this whole journey for me. Please, don’t just drop by — schedule a visit if possible. And know it might be canceled at the last minute, even as you’re ringing the doorbell. Many of us on breast cancer journeys don’t know how we’re going to feel from minute to minute, and even carefully made plans sometimes have to be rescheduled. Offer to be an on-call visitor: It’s nice to have people willing to visit on short notice when you need a lift. I wish I’d created a code word to text my BFFs, something like “goose poo,” that would mean, “Someone visit me now: I’m on the floor in my jammies sobbing.”

2. Randomly drop off something loved.

One of my absolute very favorite things is fresh flowers and receiving them really perked me up. For others, a fave thing might be chocolate or scented lotions. Whatever it is, bring it to us — but please don’t expect to visit when you’re dropping off. We might be sleeping, in too much pain or just not in the mood to talk.

>> 15 things everyone battling cancer must do

Kristen Wicker relaxes at home in Dayton during her cancer treatment. CONTRIBUTED(Contributing Writer)

3. Share healthy food.

If a meal train has been organized, use it to avoid “over-fooding.” We received so much food, especially at the beginning of my journey, we had to move “buy fridge for basement” from No. 27 on our to-do list to No. 1. Drop off portions in several small containers so some can be frozen. The meal train also will help you learn what the person likes, as well as what she can’t eat. During chemo, many of us can’t eat raw food, such as sushi or even salad, or anything spicy. And while there’s certainly a temptation to eat nothing but macaroni and cheese and beer during chemo, our bodies need healthy whole, rather than processed, food.

4. Keep in touch.

Send cards, emails, texts, social media messages and make calls. Several friends, family members and co-workers sent me cards on the regular, and every card I received brightened my mood. We almost had to buy more furniture where I could prop my cards. I also loved receiving drawings from my friends’ kids. Nothing says “happy” and “live to the fullest” like a child’s coloring. Send anything funny, no matter how corny, that elicits a laugh. Anything hopeful and inspiring is great, too. Just hearing from folks and knowing they were rooting for me was so empowering. During some of my less-than-optimistic moments, I’d re-read the cards on my mantel and scroll back through Facebook posts and texts. It would remind me I had an A-list team walking with me.

5. Help with chores.

Grocery shopping, cleaning, laundry, yard work — all the things you just love to do at your own home can be especially hard for a cancer patient to complete. One of my neighbors would text me as she was headed to the grocery, and I’d reply with a list and then just repay her. My yard will never look good as it did this summer after a crew of friends helped with landscaping and planting.

On March 1, during her first time receiving chemo at the Kettering Cancer Center, Kristen Wicker colored what she felt was a very appropriate page in her dirty words coloring book. CONTRIBUTED(Contributing Writer)

6. Give from the heart.

I now have a collection of things I will always treasure from friends I just adore: a hand-knitted shawl, a rock with the word “courage,” artwork, stuffed animals, a thin silver bracelet with “never give up” stamped on top and one with a bead for each of my Noble Circle sisters, a medal with a pink ribbon that reads: “I kicked cancer’s butt: What’s your superpower?” I also received Reiki, restorative yoga and meditation sessions, and a foot massage from friends who are healers. A list of books, movies, TV shows and anything to stream on Netflix you love and think we might enjoy is also a useful and thoughtful gift. 

>> Ways to join the fight against cancer

7. Offer rides.

I couldn’t drive for long periods of time thanks to being on pain medications or just being in pain. Some of my trips to doctor appointments turned into lunch or shopping dates, adding a dose of fun to something that is anything but.

Kristen Wicker (left) is taking her first-time wig shopping seriously with friends (L-R) Mindy Finch, Alexis Larsen and Amelia Robinson at Beauty Outlet, 4599 Salem Ave. CONTRIBUTED(Contributing Writer)

8. Make a play date.

Offer to take us out for some fun times so we can get out of our Hobbit hole and back into the real world. My adventures included pedicures and manicures, lots of wonderful meals, and attending a poetry class, festivals and art exhibits. Invite us out to do things you think we’ll enjoy, but that aren’t too physically taxing. If we can’t get out of the house, bring the adventures to our door. For example, two of my main gals brought over brunch stuff and cooked for me one day when I was really sick. It was such a relief to laugh with them without having to leave the comfort of my sleep recliner.

9. Help with organizing.

One thing’s for sure: Cancer patients have a lot of paper, whether it’s bills, receipts, care instructions or manuals about caring for wigs. It’s almost too much for one brain, especially one in a chemo fog, to process. Staying on top of things is tough when you’re sick. One of my friends helped gather addresses for thank you notes (which reminds me I still need to write those … ) and another created a Lotsa Helping Hands page for me to organize the assistance I needed to come out strong on the other side.

Kristen Wicker (right) shortly after going bald and her partner and primary caregiver, Matthew Leclaire, at home in Dayton. CONTRIBUTED(Contributing Writer)

10. Offer to help the primary caregiver.

Whether a spouse, partner, friend or family member, it’s likely one or two people are doing the bulk of the dirty work. And it’s definite those folks are stressed, too. My partner went to a lot of rock shows, played cards and went to movies with his friends to blow off steam. Drop off something for the primary caregiver along with those flowers.