Interval training burns more calories in less time

Published: Tuesday, October 16, 2012 @ 1:31 AM

Don’t have time to exercise? That excuse no longer works. Increasing evidence, including new research presented this week, shows that even short workouts that include surges of very high intensity can boost fitness and potentially shrink the waistline.

In the new study, exercise physiology graduate student Kyle Sevits of Colorado State University and his team demonstrated that a mere 2.5 minutes of giving it your all on an exercise bike can burn up to 220 calories.

That doesn’t mean that you can do an entire workout during a commercial break. Instead, those 2.5 minutes should be divided into five 30-second sprint intervals, each followed by a four-minute period of light, resistance-free pedaling. All told, that is less than 25 minutes, during which you will burn more calories than if you did 30 minutes of moderate cycling.

"You burn a lot of calories in a very short time," says Sevits. "Nearly all the calories are burned in those 2.5 minutes; you burn very few during the rest period."

He also points to additional benefits that come from interval training, including increased insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance, both of which are important for overall good health.

“This kind of research could help motivate people to get fitter and burn more calories,” says Heather Gillespie, MD, a sports medicine specialist at UCLA Medical Center in Santa Monica. She was not involved in the research. “It’s a very small study, but it’s very promising and adds more evidence to the benefits of interval training.”

Sprinting in the Lab

For the study, Sevits and his colleagues recruited 10 healthy men with the average age of 25. For three days, the recruits prepared for the study by eating a strict diet based on their caloric needs so that the researchers could be sure they were neither overfed nor underfed. Then they were checked into the lab.

The rooms where they spent the next two days were outfitted with equipment that allowed the researchers to measure the number of calories each recruit burned during their stay. They stuck to the same diet while they sat in front of the computer or watched movies. On one of the days, though, they had to exercise.

The sprint interval workout went like this: After a two minute warm-up came 30 seconds during which each man had to pedal as hard and fast as he could against high resistance. Four minutes of relaxed riding followed. Then, he went all out for another half minute.

All told, the participants each did five bursts in which they pushed themselves to their limits. They each burned approximately 220 calories for their efforts.

Previous studies have shown that high-intensity interval training such as this can aid the heart, both in healthy people and in those already suffering from heart disease. But while its health benefits may be established, its effect on calories has been far from clear, according to the authors. This study provides preliminary evidence that this kind of exercise may help maintain a healthy weight and, potentially, help shed pounds.

Do Try This at Home -- With a Bit of Caution

Gillespie says that, like any workout, sprint interval training comes with caveats.

“Everybody’s 100% is different,” she says, so people should know their limits. “I want people to move, but I also want to prevent injury.”

She points out that interval training on a stationary bike is a low-impact exercise, which means it’s easier on the joints. People should be more cautious with higher impact exercises, like running, especially if they are overweight or obese.

Gillespie also cautions that no one should try to cram their workout into just a couple of minutes.

“You can’t sustain that high intensity for 2.5 minutes, and the rest period is just as important as the workout,” she says. “If you want, you can always check your email during those four minutes.”

When it comes to reaping the benefits of interval training, Sevits says people face some significant hurdles.

"The biggest barriers are the difficulty of this type of exercise and maintaining the commitment to do it," says Sevits.

He says that working with a personal trainer, who can encourage their clients to really push themselves, may be a way to go.

"That kind of coaching can be really motivating," he says.

Beginners, Sevits continues, should ease into interval training.

"First, build up your endurance, confidence, and comfort on whatever machine you have chosen before you start to really push yourself, then toss a few sprints into your regular 30-minute workout."

And if you find yourself struggling to maintain your max for those 30-second sprints? Don't sweat it too much.

"In reality, there's a whole continuum of benefits to reap as you get closer to your max," says Sevits.

The study was presented in Westminster, Colo., at a joint meeting of the American Physiological Society, the American College of Sports Medicine, and the Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology.

These findings were presented at a medical conference. They should be considered preliminary as they have not yet undergone the "peer review" process, in which outside experts scrutinize the data prior to publication in a medical journal.

SOURCES: Integrative Biology of Exercise VI meeting, Oct. 10-13, 2012, Westminster, Colo.Kyle Sevits, graduate student, exercise physiology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colo.Heather Gillespie, MD, sports medicine physician, UCLA Medical Center, Santa Monica.Kessler, H. Sports Medicine, June 2012.Guiraud, T. Sports Medicine, June 2012.CDC: "Physical Activity for Healthy Weight."

© 2012 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved.

Scientists engineer proteins that caused obese animals to lose weight and lower cholesterol

Published: Thursday, October 19, 2017 @ 3:03 PM

Oftentimes healthy eating and exercise are the first to go as life gets more and more hectic Nutrition is 80-90% of successful weight loss in your 30s You should eat 3 regular meals and 2 snacks per day Log your food intake and exercise to motivate you to move more and reassess the food you're eating Find time to make healthy eating and exercise work for you If you're trying to get back in the habit of training, don't overthink it. It's more important to get started Don't go and join a gym until you real

As the U.S. obesity rate has galloped toward 40 percent, doctors, drug designers and dispirited dieters have all wondered the same thing: What if a pill could deliver the benefits of weight-loss surgery, but without the knife?

New research brings that hope a notch closer.

Scientists from the biotechnology company Amgen Inc. report they have identified and improved upon a naturally occurring protein that brought about significant changes in obese mice and monkeys, including weight loss and rapid improvements on measures of metabolic and heart health.

The results, published Wednesday in Science Translational Medicine, approximate some of the mysteriously powerful effects of bariatric surgery, in which a surgeon reshapes the stomach and intestinal tract to reduce their capacity. Even before surgery patients lose a lot of weight, most see marked improvements in obesity-related conditions like insulin resistance, high circulating blood sugar and worrisome cholesterol levels.

>> How he came to weigh over 700 pounds — and then lose more than half of it

In mice who got a bioengineered version of the GDF15 protein, the researchers observed even more remarkable changes. These obese mice turned their noses up at extra-rich condensed milk — a treat that normally prompts mice to gorge themselves. Given the choice, the treated mice tended to opt for standard mouse chow instead, or at least lowered their intake of the fattening condensed milk.

After 35 days, obese mice treated with the bioengineered GDF15 proteins lost roughly 20 percent of their body weight, while mice getting a placebo gained about 6 percent over their starting weight, according to the study. When mice were offered the rich condensed milk, triglyceride levels remained at baseline or rose by about 20 percent in those who got the engineered proteins, while levels more than doubled in the untreated mice. Insulin levels and total cholesterol readings were also significantly better in treated animals than in their untreated counterparts.

The results suggest that the GDF15 engineered by researchers had the power to turn off the kind of reward-driven eating (think doughnuts, milkshakes or bacon cheeseburgers) that drives many of us to become obese, or to regain lost weight.

>> The sour truth about artificial sweeteners

Some of the weight-loss medications approved in recent years by the Food and Drug Administration — including Belviq, Contrave, Qsymia and Saxenda — appear to nudge the food preferences of obese patients in more healthful directions. But bariatric surgery has a pronounced effect in shifting patients’ preferences away from high-fat foods. Scientists just don’t know why.

The natural version of the GDF15 protein breaks down quickly in the blood. To be an effective weight-loss aid, it would need more staying power.

The Amgen researchers accomplished this by fusing the protein with other agents that would not break down so quickly. The two engineered versions of GDF15 remain biologically active in the blood for longer.

In the brains of the lab animals that received the treatment, the study authors detected activation in a population of brain-stem cells that transmits complex signals between the brain and gut.

In obese people, those signals — which urge us to eat when we’re hungry and to stop once we’ve eaten — become faulty, causing us to overeat and gain weight. Bariatric surgery appears to correct those signals.

So the suggestion that GDF15 might do the same is an exciting indication that a piece of bariatric surgery’s magic might be bottled up in a pill.

>> Woman's explicitly detailed grocery list leaves little room for error for husband

“This is a new system” involved in the regulation of appetite, said Dr. Ken Fujioka, a weight-loss specialist at Scripps Clinic Del Mar. “It’s not one we’ve seen before, and that’s a big deal.”

At the same time, the system manipulated by GDF15 is only one of the chemical signaling systems that goes awry in obesity, said Fujioka, an expert on brain-gut signaling who was not involved in the new research. If a drug is to help a wide range of patients with obesity — and to aid in the twin challenges of losing weight and keeping it off — it will need to activate many different systems at once.

While bariatric surgery has been shown to be effective in spurring weight loss and a broad range of other health improvements, it is invasive, costly and irreversible. And although about 196,000 Americans had the surgery in 2015, according to the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, that’s only a tiny fraction of the roughly 100 million adults who are now considered obese.

On Wednesday, Amgen called the new research “early,” but said its focus on obesity fits with its interest in drugs to treat cardiovascular disease.

New findings like these help put effective treatment in reach for a growing number of the obese, Fujioka said. Obesity is a diabolically complex disease with many contributing factors, “but someday I personally think we really will be there,” he added.

Boy sleeps for 11 straight days, baffling doctors

Published: Thursday, October 19, 2017 @ 2:55 AM

Boy Falls Asleep for 11 Straight Days, Doctors Don’t Know Why

When a 7-year-old boy fell asleep following a late-night wedding party, his mother expected him to be tired, but she could never fathom what would unfold.

>> Watch the news report here

WDRB 41 Louisville News

The boy, Wyatt Shaw, was admitted to Norton Children’s Hospital in Louisville, Kentucky, during the first week of October after his mother tried and tried and tried to wake up him following the exciting Sunday night wedding festivities.

“Monday I tried to wake him up, and he fell back to sleep,” the boy’s mother, Amy Shaw, told WDRB. “[I’d say], ‘Wyatt, Wyatt, Wyatt!’ And he fell back to sleep again.”

Wyatt slept for 11 consecutive daysAccording to WTVR, medication usually used to treat seizures finally woke the boy up, but doctors are mystified by what happened. Every test performed on Wyatt came back clear.

>> On Rare.us: 'Nothing brings me more joy': Artist brings smiles to sick children with beautiful tattoos

“[The doctors] said, ‘We’ll probably never know, but we’re just going to treat him now with rehab to get him better,’” Amy Shaw said.

>> On Rare.us: Anthony Rizzo breaks down in tears at Chicago hospital

Wyatt is having some trouble talking and walking, but he’s improving and is well aware of his story, WDRB reported. The only thing he doesn’t understand is the same thing the doctors don’t — what happened to him.

>> Read more trending news 

His mom hopes he’s back to showing off the energy he’s always exhibited, especially that night cutting up the dance floor at the wedding.

A benefit concert is being held for Wyatt and his family from 6 to 10 p.m. Oct. 26 at Northside Hall in Radcliff, Kentucky.

The blessing inside my sister's Alzheimer's disease

Published: Sunday, March 05, 2017 @ 12:56 PM

Jennifer Palmieri's sister Dana Drago, who was diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer's. MUST CREDIT: Courtesy of Jennifer Palmieri.
Handout
Jennifer Palmieri's sister Dana Drago, who was diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer's. MUST CREDIT: Courtesy of Jennifer Palmieri.(Handout)

Last month my sister passed away from early-onset Alzheimer's. She was 58 and probably had the disease for well over a decade. 

Awful. Anyone I share this news with has a visible physical reaction to it. They shudder. Take a deep breath. It's the disease everyone fears. Alzheimer's doesn't just kill you, they are thinking, it robs you of the person you are long before it has the mercy to kill you. 

Every day, more Americans receive the devastating news that someone in their family has this affliction. For now, there is not a lot of hope for recovery. It can make you envious of cancer patients; their families get to have hope. Having come through this experience with my sister, I am afraid that I can't offer these new Alzheimer's families hope for a recovery. But I do hope that by relaying the story of my sister's journey, I can offer them some peace. 

My sister Dana was brilliant, beautiful, full of positive energy, a force of nature. She was not an easy person. She was driven and successful, and, as the disease progressed unbeknown to all of us, it became harder to connect with her. Ironically, that began to change once she got the diagnosis. 

When she called each of us with the news, she already had it all figured out. We were all to understand that, really, she saw the diagnosis as a blessing. It was going to allow her to retire early. It would motivate our family to spend time together we would not have otherwise done. It would shorten her life, but she would make sure the days she had left were of the highest quality.  

For my part, I had a hard time reconciling her optimistic attitude with the knowledge there was no hope for recovery. I envied those cancer patients. But I eventually learned one of the gifts that came with this illness: It strips away your notions of how life is supposed to be and forces you to reassess what it means for a moment, a day, a life to have value. 

Equipped with a more realistic set of expectations, I saw that families fighting cancer faced their own torment. Debilitating treatments, anxiety over whether you are pursuing the right treatment, unrealistic hopes and crushing disappointments. It could ruin whatever time the person has left. My family was spared that particular kind of torment. Dana was true to her word about how she was going to spend her time. In the end, she had far fewer days than we expected, but she brought our family together in ways we never would have enjoyed had she not been ill, and in ways we could not have enjoyed if she was in endless treatments. That was a blessing. 

Patti Eilbacher has Alzheimer's. AJC reporter Zachary Hansen demonstrates a simple test that can indicate a cognitive disease. (BOB ANDRES/AJC)

I should be clear that my sister did not give up her own hope of recovering from Alzheimer's. Early on, she spoke of changes she had to make in her life until "they" found a cure for "this disease." I admired her resolute refusal to see the disease as part of herself. She would not let it define her. 

For years she vigilantly fought her decline and sought to protect her independence. Eventually she ended up in hospice. But she needn't have worried that leaving her home meant losing herself. It was in that hospice room that I saw her refined - not reduced but refined - to her most essential self, a person full of grace and love. Of all the moments in my life I had with my big sister, the ones with the most value, the most intimacy, the most joy, were the ones I spent simply holding her hand in her hospice room. No distractions, no expectations or pressures, a time to simply be present, to simply be sisters. My other two sisters, Dana's best friend and I would sit with Dana and repeat her own mantra back to her - all is well. And it was.  

Even after she largely lost the ability to speak, I could look into her eyes and see she was still there. She was still Dana. I would tell her so. "I see you. I see you in there." She would nod in response. Once or twice, I would even get a smile. Those were days of true value. 

I wish no other family ever had to lose someone to "this disease." But for all those on this path, please know that it does not mean you must be robbed of your loved ones before they leave this earth. They are still there, and the time you spend with them can be a gift of grace you might otherwise never have known. My hope for you is that you get to share the heavenly peace and love our family was able to share with our sister while she was with us. It is a blessing.  

- - -  

Palmieri served as White House communications director from 2013 to 2015 and was communications director for Hillary Clinton's 2016 presidential campaign.

Grandmother adopts healthy habits and loses more than 100 pounds

Published: Thursday, July 13, 2017 @ 1:59 PM

Time Inc.
Time
Time Inc.(Time)

Laura Hyman is proof that it’s never too late to make a change.

After losing both her mother and mother-in-law in short period of time, the 54-year-old grandmother decided it was finally time to lose weight.

“My mother was only 70 years old [when she died] and I was 50 years old. I got scared and I did not want to miss out on my kids and my grandkids,” said Hyman, who was used to “taking care of everyone else but myself.” At her heaviest, she weighed 264 lbs.

RELATED: 12 weight-loss secrets from Atlantans who shed 100-plus pounds

A self-described “emotional eater,” Hyman started the Isagenix weight loss program with her husband Myron in September 2015. Swapping fried foods and carb-heavy meals in favor of organic foods like chicken, quinoa and vegetables and enjoying the program’s shakes helped the retired Indio, California-based couple lose 100 pounds each in less than a year.

“[Isagenix] gave us a time schedule for our meals and snacks,” says Hyman, who now weighs 161 lbs. and eats five times a day: two shakes, two snacks and one full meal. “This system taught us that not only the food we are eating counts but the timing of when we are eating is so important.” Now after dinner, Hyman says, “the kitchen is closed.”

RELATED VIDEO: 5 small diet changes that can help cut calories

5 small diet changes that can cut calories | Rare Life

The couple also started the IsaBody Challenge, a 16-week body transformation program, at the beginning of their weight loss journeys.

“It became a great support system through the Isabody Facebook page,” says Hyman. “I could go on there daily and get workout ideas and meal ideas, and when I put my first before-and-after pictures in there, I could not believe how much love and support I got. It was unlike anything I have ever experienced.”

RELATED: Here's one weight loss tip for every day of the week, according to Atlanta dietitians

Since October, Hyman has also amped up her workouts, hiring a trainer and going to the gym 3 to 4 times a week. “I’ve gained 8 lbs. of lean muscle, which is different because I’m used to the scale going down,” she says. “But now it’s going up and I’m seeing where it is, in muscle. I’m still able to get rid of the visceral fat with the system and it’s amazing.”

Now on her sixth IsaBody Challenge, Hyman was just picked as a finalist out of more than 30,000 applicants Myron received an honorable mention, and she feels better than ever.

RELATED: 9 things no one tells you about weight-loss surgery

“I fuel my body and don’t eat for emotional reasons,” she says. “I feel better than I did in my 20s.”

And being able to do it with her husband has made it even more rewarding.

“We’ve both invested in each other, cheered each other on and never let the other feel like a failure,” says Hyman. “Accomplishing this weight loss together has made our relationship so much stronger.”

Related