Guess how much Fifth Street Brewpub’s weekly giveback night has raised for local charities?

Published: Monday, July 31, 2017 @ 6:00 AM

Fifth Street Brewpub has raised $50,000 for local charities since it launched its giveback Monday program in 2013.  Tanya Brock is the pub's general manager.
Fifth Street Brewpub has raised $50,000 for local charities since it launched its giveback Monday program in 2013. Tanya Brock is the pub's general manager.

Slinging beer at this Dayton brewery is about more than just slinging beer.

Tanya Brock, the general manager of Fifth Street Brewpub, said on Monday night it is also about raising money and awareness for local nonprofits.

>> Fifth Street Brewpub hires former Carillon Brewery brewmaster 

Since 2013, the much-beloved co-op at 1600 E 5th St. in the St. Anne's Hill neighborhood has raised $50,000 for hundreds of local nonprofits through its FSB Gives Back program.

“It is a core piece of who we are, not just a program. It is part of our mission,” Brock said. “It is something we are super proud of and really hope it continues to grow.”

The business was the first of its kind to set up such a program in the area and helped start a trend among locally-owned bars and breweries.  

“There are a lot of copycats in Dayton and I think that’s cool,” Brock said.

The FSB’s slogan is “Building a community one beer at a time.” Indications are that its Monday giveback is doing just that. 

The program is so popular that all but a few dates are booked through next summer.

>> Where can you volunteer in Dayton

The FSB recently launched a brunch giveback program from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. the first and third Sundays of each month. 

Charities receive tips from the pub’s guests, 5 percent of net sales of food and drinks, and $1 from the sale of a pre-selected beer brewed at Fifth Street Brewpub.  

Fifth Street Brewpub has raised $50,000 for local charities since it launched its giveback Monday program in 2013. Tanya Brock is the pub's general manager.

Opened in 2012, FSB is Ohio’s first co-op brewery. It is open to the public. Each co-op member-owner has an equal share of the company.

Volunteers from a long list of nonprofits ranging from Antioch Writers' Workshop at University of Dayton to the Rubi Girls drag Troupe to FilmDayton to Paw Patrol Dayton to the Greater Greene Co. Chapter of the American 
Legion Riders to Alzheimer's Association have served as guest bartenders. 

>> Fifth Street Brewpub captures two golds in beer competition

They serve drinks, but really, their mission is bigger than that. 

“More importantly, they are talking to everyone at the bar or on the patio about the great things they do,” Brock said.

Most nonprofits will raise a few hundred dollars through tips alone. 

Brock said the program allows FSB to give back to the community and exposes FSB customers to charities and nonprofit supporters to the pub. 

>> When Fifth Street Brewpub threw itself a fifth birthday bash

Supporters can show their love for nonprofits and what they do to make Dayton better, Brock said. 

“It is a constant loop,” she said. “It is not just for Suzie’s birthday fund or Joe’s beer drinking fund.” 

Fifth Street Brewpub has raised $50,000 for local charities since it launched its giveback Monday program in 2013. Tanya Brock is the pub's general manager.
Fifth Street Brewpub has raised $50,000 for local charities since it launched its giveback Monday program in 2013. Tanya Brock is the pub's general manager.

When is Beggars Night in your city?

Published: Friday, October 14, 2016 @ 11:20 AM
Updated: Thursday, October 12, 2017 @ 8:44 AM

No Tricks, Just Treats: How to Have a Safe Halloween

It's almost time to gets the kids out for this year’s Beggars Nights (aka trick-or-treating).

It's time to plan your perfect costume, grab a bucket for all of those treats and be adorable. 

>> RELATED: Halloween Guide 2017

We've compiled Beggars Night dates and times in communities across the region.

When is Beggars Night in your community?

>>> FOR KIDS: Halloween fun for the kids all month long

>>> FOR ADULTS: More than 10 of the best Halloween events (for adults)

Why are more black women dying of breast cancer compared to white women?

Published: Friday, October 20, 2017 @ 12:58 PM

What You Need to Know: Breast Cancer

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, black women under 60 years old are more likely to die from breast cancer than white women in the same age group. In fact, data from 2015 showed black women had a 39 percent higher breast cancer death rate.

>> Read more trending news

New research from Emory University, the American Cancer Society (ACS) and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute points to differences in health insurance as the culprit.

The findings, published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, included data from the National Cancer Data Base on 563,497 black and white women between the ages of 18 and 64 who had been diagnosed with stage I to stage III breast cancer between 2004 and 2013.

The researchers examined five factors for the study:

  • Demographics (age, stage, state, year of diagnosis, etc.)
  • Comorbidities (other health conditions)
  • Insurance (lack of insurance, private insurance, Medicare/Medicaid, etc.)
  • Tumor characteristics (size, type, stage, etc.)
  • Treatment (chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, surgery, etc.)

The findings

They found that insurance explained one-third of the additional risk of death among the black women compared to white women diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer.

Additionally, almost three times as many black women (22.7 percent) were either uninsured or had Medicaid insurance compared to white women (8.4 percent).

“Lack of insurance is a barrier to receipt of timely and high-quality treatment and screening services,” study authors wrote.

Other major factors that explained the differences: tumor characteristics (23.2 percent), comorbidities (11.3 percent) and treatment (4.8 percent).

Nearly 80 percent of the women in the study had the most common type of breast cancer (hormone receptor-positive breast cancer) and according to the researchers, when matched for factors such as insurance, comorbidity and others, those factors accounted for a combined 76.3 percent of the total excess risk of death in black patients.

The authors noted that when it came to treatment differences, black and white women contrasted most for hormone therapy, which, according to ACS, is typically used after surgery to help reduce the chance of recurrence.

“Several studies reported that black women are less likely to complete chemotherapy and hormone therapy,” study author Ahmedin Jemal told the ACS. “This could be for many reasons, including problems with transportation or the inability to pay for medicine.”

Additionally, previous research has shown that black women get lower quality mammograms and are less likely to have a follow-up appointment after receiving abnormal mammograms.

(Scott Barbour/Getty Images)

And insurance is vital for both high-quality cancer care and for early detection.

“We know so much about cancer prevention and control,” Jemal, who is also vice president of the ACS surveillance and health services research program, said. “But we’re not applying it to the whole population equally. We have to make the standard of care available to everyone, including people with low income. And blacks are disproportionately represented in that group.”

Read the full study at ascopubs.org

Can you master this Dayton mega hiking challenge?

Published: Thursday, October 19, 2017 @ 6:00 AM

Here are Dayton's top places to take a hike (video by Tabatha Wharton)

Camaraderie, calorie burning and even creativity – the Every Trail MetroPark Challenge Series can provide it all.

“Hiking is a great way to clear your head, reset, refocus and find inspiration,” avid hiker Michelle Coleman said.

It was, in fact, while Michelle and her husband Brian were on a hike a few years ago that the concept of the challenge series came to life.

“We went hiking on Thanksgiving Day and thought, ‘wouldn’t it be great to hike every park,’ ” she said. “By the end of our three-mile hike, we had it all figured out.”

The first challenge got underway four years ago with Michelle and Brian leading the hikes. Another series was held the following year. Last year’s challenge was derailed a bit as Michelle was sidelined with a stress fracture. But she will be back on the trail for this year’s Every Trail MetroPark Challenge Series, which gets underway on Sunday at Hills & Dales.

>> The best hiking trails in Dayton

The goal of The Every Trail MetroPark Challenge Series is to thru-hike every trail color and non-color coded trails, except for mountain and bridle trails in every Five Rivers MetroPark in one season. Those who complete the challenge will receive a thru-hiker patch. CONTRIBUTED(Contributing Writer)

The goal of the series is to thru-hike every trail – color and non-color coded trails, except for mountain and bridle trails – in every Five Rivers MetroPark in one season. Those who complete the challenge will receive a thru-hiker patch. An occasional time conflict is not a problem as participants who miss a group hike can complete it on their own and still earn the patch.

“Year one far exceeded anyone’s expectations in terms of participation, so we upped the ante a bit and went at a little faster pace the second year,” Coleman said. “We will do the same this year.”

From a 3.5-mile excursion through Hills & Dales on Week 1 to an 18-mile trek through Germantown in early March, the distance will increase with each hike. That hasn’t been a deterrent, as close to 20 people signed up for the challenge the first day it was posted online.

>> Meet the local guy who hiked 1,400 miles across Ohio

The goal of The Every Trail MetroPark Challenge Series is to thru-hike every trail color and non-color coded trails, except for mountain and bridle trails in every Five Rivers MetroPark in one season. Those who complete the challenge will receive a thru-hiker patch. CONTRIBUTED(Contributing Writer)

“I think people need something to look forward to in the winter,” Coleman said.

Ben Kendrick – who completed the challenge two years ago – agrees.

“It’s great motivation, getting out and hiking with a group,” he said.

The Huber Heights hiker enjoyed the camaraderie and the variety.

“I signed up so I could check out all of the MetroParks,” Kendrick said. “I frequented quite a few of them, but others were new to me.”

>> How Metroparks has made planning your hikes a piece of cake

Kendrick’s love of hiking has grown steadily over the years and he is now a hike leader with the Dayton Hikers.

Coleman is hopeful that this series will spark that enthusiasm in other novice or experienced hikers.

“We’re very excited to be able to help keep them motivated,” she said.

For more information or to register for the hikes, visit the Dayton Hikers Meetup page at www.meetup.com/DaytonHikers/.

Those who complete The Every Trail MetroPark Challenge Series will receive a thru-hiker patch. CONTRIBUTED(Contributing Writer)

EVERY TRAIL METROPARK CHALLENGE SERIES

Oct. 22 2 p.m.: Hills & Dales — 3.5 miles

Nov. 5 10 a.m.: Cox Arboretum — 4 miles

Nov. 12 2 p.m.: Aullwood/Englewood South — 4.8 miles

Nov. 26 2 p.m.: Carriage Hill — 6.5 miles

Dec. 10 2 p.m.: Sugarcreek — 6.6 miles

Dec. 16 10 a.m.: Island/Deeds/RiverScape — 7 miles

Jan. 14 1 p.m.: Possum Creek — 8 miles

Jan. 21 1 p.m.: Twin Creek — 9.7 miles

Feb. 4 1 p.m.: Englewood — 10.5 miles

Feb. 11 1 p.m.: Eastwood-Huffman & back — 9+ miles

Feb. 18 10 a.m.: Taylorsville — 16 miles

March 4 10 a.m.: Germantown —18 miles

To be determined, Wesleyan and Wegerzyn

Trick-or-treating: Top Halloween safety tips

Published: Friday, October 13, 2017 @ 6:35 PM

No Tricks, Just Treats: How to Have a Safe Halloween

Halloween should be about treats, but some tricks such as dangerous situations can quickly ruin the fun. The following trick-or-treating safety tips can help you and your kids avoid issues.

COSTUME SAFETY

Costumes and other components can create hazards if you’re not careful. The following tips from the Centers for Disease Control and the National Safety Council will help you make sure your child’s disguise doesn’t cause any hazards:

  • Look for light-colored, flame-resistant costumes
    Look for masks, wigs, costumes and other components that are labeled as flame-resistant or made of flame-resistant fabrics such as polyester or nylon. Also choose light-colored costumes when possible since they’re easier for drivers to spot at night.
  • Look for a proper fit
    Make sure all masks, shoes and other parts of your child’s costume fit well. He or she should be able to see well and walk without tripping over a costume that drags the ground or because of shoes that are too large. 
  • Take care with makeup
    Buy only nontoxic Halloween makeup, and always test it in a small area first, the CDC recommends. Remove it before bedtime to help prevent irritation.
  • Use safe accessories
    Use swords, knives and other accessories made of soft materials that won’t cause injury if your child falls on them.
  • Make your child more visible.
    The CDC suggests adding reflective tape to your child’s costume and treat bag to make him or her more visible.
  • Protect their eyes
    Skip wearing decorative contact lenses to avoid injuring your eyes, and don’t let your kids wear them.

ROAD SAFETY

Drive carefully and keep your kids safe as they navigate neighborhood streets with the following tips:

  • Slow down and be cautious
    If you’re driving on Halloween, slow down in residential neighborhoods and watch out for trick-or-treaters who may unexpectedly dart into the street. Especially if they’re wearing dark costumes, they can be difficult to see. 
  • Be visible
    Turn your headlights on, even if it’s still light outside, so you’ll be more visible to trick-or-treaters.
  • Arm trick-or-treaters with flashlight
    Make sure your trick-or-treaters carry a flashlight with fresh batteries, but teach them to carry it facing downward so they don’t temporarily blind oncoming drivers.
  • Stick to sidewalks
    Walk on sidewalks when possible, and if they’re not available, walk on the left side of the road so you’re facing traffic.
  • Cross the street safely
    Cross streets only at the corner, and never cross between parked vehicles.
  • Make sure kids are supervised
    If you’re not accompanying your kids, ensure that they’re going with another adult or an older, responsible young person if they’re under 12. 

    CANDY SAFETY
    Make sure you child’s candy doesn’t cause any harm with the following tips:
  • Inspect your child’s candy
    Tell your kids to wait until you can look through their candy at home before they eat any. Tampering is rare, but it does happen. Look for any tears in wrappers, tiny pinholes, or anything that looks discolored or unusual. Throw out anything that isn’t commercially wrapped, unless it’s a homemade treat from someone you personally know well.
  • Check for allergens
    If your child has a food allergy, read the ingredient label of commercially wrapped treats to make sure it doesn’t contain any allergens. Skip homemade treats, since you can’t be sure of what they contain.
  • Look for teal pumpkins
    If you see a teal pumpkin at a home, that signifies that it’s safe for trick-or-treaters with food allergies since the homeowners offer non-food treats like small toys. Look for homes that display these if your child has allergies, and provide this welcoming sign of safe treats for kids who visit your home.
  • Check for choking hazards
    Check through non-candy treats to make sure they’re not a choking hazard to your child if he or she is younger. Also go through their candy and eliminate any hard candies or any other items they could choke on.

SAFE TRICK OR TREAT LOCATIONS

Choose the safest locations for your child to visit with the following tips:
  • Visit ‘trunk or treat’ events
    Organizations such as churches often hold trunk or treat events where people decorate their opened trucks and hand out candy. This helps children stay in a confined area and avoid streets and traffic.
  • Hit the mall
    Malls sometimes have Halloween events where stores give out candy to children in costume. You’ll avoid traffic and other outdoor hazards while ensuring that weather won’t be a factor.
  • Check with neighborhood associations
    If you live in a community with a neighborhood association, these organizations often have information about which houses are handing out candy. The association may also host a clubhouse party for the holiday.
  • Use Nextdoor’s treat map
    The social network site for neighborhoods has a Halloween treat map that lets you and your neighbors “advertise” that you’ll be handing out Halloween candy. You can use it to plan the best route for your trick-or-treaters.
  • Know which houses to avoid
    Several states prohibit registered sex offenders from handing out candy on Halloween, and at least one, Maryland, requires them to post “No candy at this residence” signs. You can also check the U.S. Department of Justice’s website for links to your state’s sex offender registry or download a mobile app that you can use along the way to tell you which homes to avoid.