4 carb-filled breakfast foods that won't ruin your diet

Published: Tuesday, August 22, 2017 @ 12:12 PM
Updated: Tuesday, August 22, 2017 @ 2:12 PM

Add these carb-filled foods to fuel your morning Switch white bread for whole-grain bread with protein like peanut butter, avocados, or an egg for more energy Load your old-fashioned oatmeal with nutrient-dense foods, like chopped nuts, berries, chia seeds or hulled hemp seeds Pick out a whole-grain cereal high in fiber, low in sugar and big on vitamins Start your morning with a whole grain English muffin topped with an egg, leafy greens, fresh tomato and cheese

With all the fad diets out there, it's hard to know what to eat in the morning.

Although some experts suggest that eating a low-carb diet could help you lose weight more quickly, some carbohydrates are actually good for you and can give you the sustained energy you need to get through the day.

RELATED: Considering the Paleo Diet? Here's what you need to know

According to Clemson University, a nutritious breakfast contains small amounts of protein and fat, with the bulk of the meal consisting of complex carbohydrates, like whole grains. If you've been shunning carbs in order to drop a few pounds, but feel lethargic and exhausted by lunchtime, adding a few back into your diet could give you the nutritional boost your body's craving.

 Add these carb-filled foods to fuel your morning:

Give whole grain toast a punch of power by adding an avocado or an egg.(Courtesy of megh28/Flickr/For the AJC)

Whole-grain bread with protein

Switch your morning white bread to a healthier, heartier, whole-grain counterpart, and add a little protein and fat, like peanut butter, almond butter, mashed avocado or an egg, which will give you more energy and leave you feeling satisfied for hours.

Eat old-fashioned oatmeal in the morning for a boost of long-lasting energy.(Courtesy of Jonathan Wilhoite/Flickr/For the AJC)

Loaded old-fashioned oatmeal

The soluble fiber in slow-cooked, old-fashioned oatmeal actually helps slow down how fast your body absorbs carbohydrates. This keeps your blood sugar levels more consistent and even throughout the day. Instead of having it plain, load your old-fashioned oatmeal with nutrient-dense foods, like chopped nuts, berries, chia seeds or hulled hemp seeds.

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Whole grain cereal with fruit

Starting your day with a bowl of cereal might seem like a no-no, but it's all about which cereal you pick. Avoid sugary, refined cereals, and pick out a whole-grain cereal high in fiber, low in sugar and big on vitamins. Top your bowl off with some fresh fruit that's high in antioxidants, such as raspberries or blueberries, and you'll have an early morning winner.

Homemade breakfast sandwich

Although a breakfast sandwich from a fast food restaurant might not provide you with the energy-filled morning you're hoping for, making your own homemade breakfast sandwich just might. Start with a whole grain English muffin, which contains complex carbs that digest slowly in your system, topped with an egg, leafy greens, fresh tomato and cheese.

Still confused about what to eat? Get the answers to the questions you were too afraid to ask about healthy eating here.

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6 easy side dishes anyone can make for Thanksgiving Day

Published: Wednesday, November 22, 2017 @ 3:18 PM
Updated: Wednesday, November 22, 2017 @ 3:18 PM

Here are 6 easy side dishes anyone can make for Thanksgiving Day Homemade Cranberry Sauce French Green Beans with Garlicky Almond Breadcrumbs Martha's Mini Cornbread Puddings Sweet Potato Casserole with Pecans Giada's Roasted Potatoes, Carrots, Parsnips and Brussels Sprouts Prosciutto Wrapped Asparagus

Although the turkey will surely take center stage at your Thanksgiving table, a few unforgettable side dishes can't hurt.

These simple Thanksgiving sides won't take very much time or effort to pull together, but look (and taste) like a million bucks.

RELATED: The ultimate guide to a budget-friendly Thanksgiving dinner

This Thanksgiving Day, give your family a feast they won't forget by including a few of these easy-to-make dishes to accompany the big star.

Homemade Cranberry Sauce

Delish dishes up an easy-to-make cranberry sauce that turns out right every time.

Time required: 25 minutes

Serves 6-8

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 (12-ounce) package fresh cranberries
  • 2 teaspoon orange zest
  • Pinch of salt

Directions:

     
  1. Combine sugar and water in a small saucepan, and place over low heat until sugar dissolves.
  2. Pour in cranberries, and cook around 10 minutes until berries burst.
  3. Add in orange zest and a pinch of salt.
  4. Remove from heat, and allow mixture to cool completely.
  5. Refrigerate before serving.

French Green Beans with Garlicky Almond Breadcrumbs

Just because a dish looks fancy, doesn't mean it's complicated to make. Country Living raised the bar with this elegant and easy French green bean side.

Time required: 30 minutes

Serves 8-10

Ingredients:

  • 3 tablespoons butter
  • 1 1/2 cups sourdough breadcrumbs
  • 1/2 cup almonds, sliced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/4 cup chives, chopped
  • 1 1/2 pound haricots verts (French green beans)
  • 2 tablespoons butter or olive oil

Directions:

     
  1. Melt butter in a saucepan over low to medium heat.
  2. Add in sourdough breadcrumbs and sliced almonds, stirring for 5 minutes.
  3. Add in minced garlic, and stir for 2 more minutes.
  4. Remove saucepan from heat, and stir in chopped chives, salt and pepper.
  5. Steam French green beans, then toss in butter or olive oil, adding salt and pepper to taste.
  6. Move green beans to a serving dish, then cover with seasoned, garlicky breadcrumbs.

Martha's Mini Cornbread Puddings

Martha always knows how to add flavor and simplicity to any Thanksgiving feast. Her Mini Cornbread Puddings will steal the show at this year's event.

Time required: 40 minutes

Serves 24

Ingredients:

  • Butter for greasing 
  • 1/2 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup yellow cornmeal
  • 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 1/2 cups sour cream
  • 1 (10 ounce) package frozen corn kernels, thawed

Directions:

     
  1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees Fahrenheit, and butter muffin tin cups.
  2. Combine flour, cornmeal, sugar, baking powder, salt and baking soda in a mixing bowl.
  3. Make a well in the center of the mixture, and whisk egg, sour cream and corn together inside the well.
  4. Continue mixing until just combined.
  5. Spoon mixture evenly into muffin tin cups, and bake for 10 to 15 minutes until browned and an inserted toothpick comes out clean.
  6. Allow puddings to stand for 5 minutes in tin before removing them.

Sweet Potato Casserole with Pecans

This nutty, buttery sweet potato casserole recipe from Taste of Home truly symbolizes a Southern Christmas dinner.

Time required: 1 hour 10 minutes

Serves 12

Ingredients:

  • 2 cans (40 ounces each) sweet potatoes, drained
  • 8 eggs
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • For the topping:
  • 1 cup brown sugar, packed
  • 1/3 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup pecans, chopped
  • 1/4 cup cold butter

Directions:

     
       
    1. Mash canned sweet potatoes in a mixing bowl, then add in eggs, sugar, flour, vanilla and salt. Combine completely.
    2. Grease a 13-by-9-inch glass baking dish, and pour in sweet potato mixture.
    3. Combine brown sugar, flour and pecans in a separate mixing bowl, and cut in butter with a pastry cutter until crumbs form.
    4. Sprinkle sugar mixture over sweet potato mixture, and bake for 60 to 70 minutes until an inserted knife comes out clean.

Giada's Roasted Potatoes, Carrots, Parsnips and Brussels Sprouts

Giada De Laurentiis with Food Network created this delicious and hearty root vegetable recipe that will satisfy even the pickiest palate.

Time required: 1 hour

Serves 6

Ingredients:

  • 1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 3 medium carrots, sliced into 1 1/2-inch thick pieces
  • 1/2 pound Brussels sprouts, halved
  • 1 pound red potatoes, sliced into 1 1/2-inch thick pieces
  • 3 medium parsnips, sliced into 1 1/2-inch thick pieces
  • 1 pound sweet potatoes, sliced into 1 1/2-inch thick pieces
  • 1 tablespoon oregano
  • 1 tablespoon rosemary
  • 1 teaspoon thyme
  • 1 teaspoon basil
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon ground black pepper

Directions:

     
       
    1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit, and grease an 11-by-17 glass baking dish with olive oil.
    2. Place sliced and chopped vegetables into the dish, along with herbs, salt and pepper.
    3. Toss until evenly coated, drizzling with additional olive oil if needed. Bake for 35 to 40 minutes.

Prosciutto Wrapped Asparagus

Not only are these tasty wraps from Damn Delicious damn good, they're super easy to make and take only 15 minutes to prepare.

Time required: 15 minutes

Serves 4

Ingredients:

  • 6 ounces prosciutto, sliced and halved horizontally
  • 1 pound asparagus, trimmed
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil

Directions:

     
       
         
      1. Wrap a slice of prosciutto at an angle around an asparagus spear. Repeat to wrap all asparagus spears with prosciutto.
      2. Pour olive oil into a large skillet, and cook wrapped asparagus over medium high heat until asparagus is tender and prosciutto appears crispy.
Don't want to miss the big parade this year? Here are 5 things to know about the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade before you head out.

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Dreams come true: Dunkin' Donuts combines holiday cookies with donuts

Published: Wednesday, November 15, 2017 @ 1:53 PM

This year, Dunkin' Donuts decided to make all your dreams come true On Nov. 20, the eatery will release its holiday menu It includes the Frosted Sugar Cookie Donut, Gingerbread Cookie Donut, and Snowflake Sprinkle Donut The brand promises its special holiday treats will evoke "warm memories of beloved baking favorites." Additionally, the donut shop will welcome back its seasonal Peppermint Mocha and Brown Sugar Cinnamon flavored coffee beverages

It's that time of a year, again, when holiday decorations start popping up everywhere and your favorite food places launch special seasonal treats.

This year, Dunkin' Donuts decided to make all your dreams come true, combining two delicious treats into one. Instead of choosing between a yummy holiday cookie and tasty donuts, you can have both.

RELATED: Weight Watchers debuts diet wine to toast the holidays

That's right, Dunkin' Donuts has outdone itself, bringing together the sugary deliciousness of holiday cookies with its mouthwatering donuts, the company revealed in a press release.

On Nov. 20, the eatery will release its holiday menu including the Frosted Sugar Cookie Donut, the Gingerbread Cookie Donut, the Snowflake Sprinkle Donut and MUNCHKINS donut hole treats.

The brand promises its special holiday treats will evoke "warm memories of beloved baking favorites."

Additionally, the donut shop will welcome back its seasonal Peppermint Mocha and Brown Sugar Cinnamon flavored coffee beverages. Each flavor will be available as hot or iced coffees, lattes, macchiatos and Frozen Dunkin' Coffee.

"Special cups and packaging with a festive design and the simple word, 'Joy,'" will also be released with the holiday menu, according to the company.

Some Twitter users are already getting excited about trying the seasonal treats.





But a few social media users weren’t so sure about the holiday cheer.



But hey, haters are gonna hate.

If the holiday offerings excite you, you’re in luck. Beyond the unique holiday options, Dunkin' Donuts promises to "announce special holiday promotions later this month." These will include holiday merchandise, gift ideas and value offers to be made available throughout the season.

With so many special offers, it seems that the holiday season, just like America, certainly runs on Dunkin'.

Stuffing vs. dressing: Is there really a difference?

Published: Friday, November 03, 2017 @ 11:15 AM

Is it stuffing, dressing or something else entirely? Lifestyle expert Martha Stewart says there's no real difference between stuffing and dressing Southern Living says the difference between stuffing and dressing may come down to geography If you're in the South, you're likely to look for dressing recipes. Northern states are the biggest searchers for stuffing recipes Both dressing and stuffing have the same ingredients If you're a purist, you may insist that dressing is cooked outside the bird and stuff

Almost everyone agrees that the traditional mix of spices, bread and other ingredients that's served at Thanksgiving is delicious. 

But when it comes to what to call this yummy dish, people are divided. Is it stuffing, dressing or something else entirely? And does the way it's prepared make a difference in what it's called?

RELATED: 6 easy side dishes anyone can make for Thanksgiving Day

Below, liftestyle experts from Martha Stewart to writers at Southern Living weigh in and take sides in the stuffing vs. dressing debate:

Lifestyle expert Martha Stewart says that although she can't remember anyone in her family actually stuffing the bird, she still calls it stuffing and argues there's no real difference between stuffing and dressing. Of course, she also describes its consistency as somewhere between a pudding and a custard, so Martha may not be the best source for this debate after all.

Southern Living says the difference between stuffing and dressing may come down to whether you say "y’all." Using Google Correlate, the site looked at the which states search for dressing recipes vs. stuffing and found that they don't overlap. If you're in the South, you're very likely to look for dressing recipes. Northern states are the biggest searchers for stuffing recipes. Needless to say, Southern Living declares itself as firmly on Team Dressing.

This is Christina Terriquez’ fig, walnut and dried cranberry cornbread dressing. Laura Skelding / American-Statesman(American-Statesman Staff)

Reader's digest notes that the National Turkey Federation says the terms are used interchangeably.

Food Network mentions the traditional view of stuffing being cooked inside the bird and notes that both dressing and stuffing have the same ingredients. In a nod to regional differences, the article's author, who's from Michigan, says that her family's table always had several selections of what they called stuffing, although none were stuffed inside the bird.

In a Food & Wine article, Michelle Darrisaw, who grew up in Georgia, remembers having cornbread dressing at her family's table and says that boxed Stove Top stuffing is definitely dressing. When she went to college in Atlanta, she learned that some people – her peers from northern, northeastern or West Coast states – used the term stuffing. To further muddy the water, all her friends from Pennsylvania call it "filling."

Butterball even commissioned an infographic on the matter that shows the difference doesn’t necessarily come down to region.


The verdict

Ultimately, if you're a purist, you may insist that dressing is cooked outside the bird and stuffing is cooked inside of it. If you're a Southerner, you probably call it dressing, no matter how it's prepared. And if you're from outside the South, you'll probably enjoy a serving of stuffing this Thanksgiving.

Some people consider stuffing to be only what's cooked inside of the turkey.(For the AJC)

The following recipes show how to make the dish, cooked inside and outside the bird:

Cornbread Dressing

From: Food Network

Ingredients

  • 8 tablespoons butter, divided
  • 1 large Vidalia or Spanish onion, chopped (about 1 cup)
  • Kosher salt and freshly cracked black pepper
  • ¾ cup water
  • 6 cups cubed (1-inch pieces) store-bought or homemade cornbread (about 1 pound)
  • 1/3 cup fresh sage leaves (about 12) with stems removed
  • 2 large eggs, beaten

Directions

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.

In a large skillet over medium heat, melt 2 tablespoons of the butter; add the onions and season with salt and pepper, to taste. Cook, stirring often, until light golden-brown, about 6 to 8 minutes, and remove from the pan to a small plate. Raise the heat to medium-high and add the water, scraping up the brown bits from the bottom of the skillet and allowing the water to simmer just a couple of minutes to infuse the onion flavor. Remove from the heat.

Put the cornbread in a large mixing bowl.

Melt the remaining 6 tablespoons butter in a small pan over medium heat and let it bubble until the milk solids to start to turn golden. Add the sage leaves and briefly fry until they begin to crisp, about 30 seconds. With a slotted spoon, remove sage and put on top of cornbread to drain and crisp. Remove the butter from the heat.

Add the eggs and cooked onions to the cornbread and pour the browned butter over the mixture. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Add the onion infused water, a tablespoon at a time, gently folding, until cornbread is evenly moistened but not soggy.

Pour the dressing into a 9 by 11-inch baking dish and bake in the preheated oven until the top is golden brown and the dressing is set in the middle - about 30 minutes.

Roast Turkey with Wild Rice, Sausage and Apple Stuffing

From: Food Network

Ingredients

Stuffing

  • 1 cup wild rice
  • 3 cups water
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 1 cooking apple, such as a Golden Delicious, Gravenstein or Rome, peeled, cored and chopped
  • 2 ribs celery with leaves, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves, minced
  • Pinch ground mace or nutmeg
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2 pound fresh Italian-style turkey sausage, casings removed
  • 1/2 cup pecan pieces, toasted
  • 1/4 cup freshly chopped flat-leaf parsley                              Turkey
  • 1 (8 to 10 pound) turkey, fresh or thawed
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter (1/2 stick)
  • 2 teaspoons poultry seasoning
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

Directions

Stuffing

Combine the wild rice, water, and 1/2 teaspoon salt in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low, cover, and simmer until the rice is tender and just bursting, about 30 minutes. Drain and set aside.

Adjust an oven rack to the lowest position and remove other racks. Preheat to 325 degrees.

Melt the butter in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the onion, apple, celery, garlic, thyme, mace, remaining 1 teaspoon salt and pepper. Cook until the vegetables soften, about 5 minutes. Stir in sausage and cook about 5 minutes more. Stir the cooked wild rice, pecans, and parsley into the vegetable mixture. (This can be made the day before.)

Turkey

Remove turkey parts from neck and breast cavities and reserve for other uses, if desired. Dry bird well with paper towels, inside and out. Melt the butter together with the poultry seasoning. Salt and pepper inside the cavity. Loosely add the stuffing to the cavity, set the bird on a rack in a roasting pan, breast-side up, and brush generously with the seasoned butter, then season with salt and pepper. Tent the top of the bird with foil.

Roast the turkey for about 2 hours undisturbed. Remove and discard the foil. Baste with the remaining butter. Increase oven temperature to 425 degrees and continue to roast until an instant-read thermometer registers 165 degrees when inserted into the thickest part of the thigh, about 20 to 25 minutes more. Remove turkey from oven and tent with foil for 15 minutes before carving.

The internet is discussing how strawberry pizza is the pizza nobody wanted

Published: Tuesday, October 31, 2017 @ 2:35 PM

Most people like fruit. Most people like pizza. But combine the two, and the results can be controversial — to say the least. Over the past year, the question of serving pineapple atop pizzas has been hotly debated, online and beyond. And now, thanks to Twitter, another question popped recently the fruit debate: what about strawberries as an ingredient atop a savory pie?

Although some people with particular palates may be in favor of the combination of berry, cheese and dough, most of the internet is unequivocally opposed. The response was summed up nicely by one Twitter user, who proposed a detente in the still-raging pineapple battle to focus energies instead on ridding the universe of the disturbing concoction that is strawberry pizza.

"Pineapple and non-pineapple pizza eaters must put our differences aside and join forces to defeat this evil," @lebaenesepapi wrote in a now-viral tweet.

>> Pizza delivery driver refuses to back down from attacker

Technically, the strawberry-cheese ingredient combo is not such a stretch: fruit and cheese have long been a culinary pairing, with the acid of the fruit tempering the creaminess of cheeses. And dessert pizzas with strawberry sound perfectly tasty. But a basic cheese pizza plus heated strawberry slices? That unappealing image seems to be getting the full force of the internet's ire.