Downtown business wins contest with giant octopus, mermaid in winter hat

Published: Friday, December 29, 2017 @ 12:53 PM

K12 Gallery and TEJAS won each category in the 2017 Whimsical Windows contest from the Downtown Dayton Partnership
Photo: Downtown Dayton Partnership
K12 Gallery and TEJAS won each category in the 2017 Whimsical Windows contest from the Downtown Dayton Partnership(Photo: Downtown Dayton Partnership)

A mermaid in a winter hat, her giant octopus pal and a bunch of starfish and creatively designed sea anemone helped a downtown business sweep all categories in a contest that teemed with whimsy. 

K12 Gallery and TEJAS won each and every category in Downtown Dayton Partnership’s Whimsical Windows contest.

>> PHOTOS: Whimsical Windows photo contest entrants

Val Hunt Beerbower said the gallery and art center at 341 S. Jefferson St. will receive $100 for winning each of the three categories — judge’s choice,  an online vote  hosted by Dayton.com and social media contest — for a total of $300. 

They really pushed hard and came up big,” Beerbower said. “It was a really tight race, but K12 pulled it off.” 

This writer served as a judge.  

A record 30 businesses took part in this year’s contest. 

“There are a lot more businesses in general (downtown). That is all good news,” Beerbower added. 

K12 Gallery and TEJAS won each category in the 2017 Whimsical Windows contest from the Downtown Dayton Partnership(Photo: Downtown Dayton Partnership)

Most of the holiday displays will be up through New Year’s. 

Talia Shade, K12’s art education and services manager, said the window was a collaborative effort. 

>> Oregon District restaurant to remain closed after fire

“We just thought an underwater theme would be an interesting take on whimsical,” she said. “It fell into place, then each artist added different things.” 
The display includes a backdrop designed by Jenny Campbell-Roux, a mermaid tail from Lisa Dineen and an octopus paper sculpture from Dayton artist and educator Delora Buford-Buchanan.

>> RELATED: This amazing local art teacher dressed more than a dozen Dayton funk bands

Shade said the money will likely be used to purchase art supplies for the center. 

She said the victories were great suprises. 

“Hopefully this will bring in more artists and more kids,” she said. 

>> New Year’s Eve Guide: The best places in and around Dayton to ring in 2018

K12 Gallery and TEJAS won each category in the 2017 Whimsical Windows contest from the Downtown Dayton Partnership.(Photo: Downtown Dayton Partnership)

K12 Gallery and TEJAS won each category in the 2017 Whimsical Windows contest from the Downtown Dayton Partnership.(Photo: Downtown Dayton Partnership)

K12 Gallery and TEJAS won each category in the 2017 Whimsical Windows contest from the Downtown Dayton Partnership.(Photo: Downtown Dayton Partnership)

Do you need 8 glasses of water per day? 6 myths and truths about drinking water

Published: Thursday, August 17, 2017 @ 1:49 PM
Updated: Tuesday, January 23, 2018 @ 11:56 AM

Here are six of the most prominent myths about drinking water Myth #1: Drinking lots of water will curb your appetite Fact: The only weight-loss benefit of drinking lots of water is that it keeps your mouth too busy to eat Myth #2: You might be thirsty when you think you're hungry Fact: You're probably hungry when you think you're hungry Myth #3: You need to chugalug water constantly or risk imminent dehydration Fact: A healthy diet and drinking when you're thirsty will hydrate you just fine Myth #4: You

Just like the old saying, "water, water everywhere," myths about drinking water are also everywhere. 

Some of them are hype from marketers or overzealous trainers, but most are just misconceptions that have been accepted into the culture. Knowing the truth can help you with healthy hydration and might even save you some anxiety or some hard-earned money.

» RELATED: Considering the water diet? Here’s what you need to know 

Certainly, staying hydrated does contribute to overall health, according to experts like Dr. Angie Eakin, a family medicine physician at Barnard Medical Center in Washington, D.C. 
"Every single cell in your body needs fluid to function properly," she told Health.com. "That's why even mild dehydration can make you irritable, foggy-headed, and headachy."
But numerous misconceptions have flowed from the basic principle that staying hydrating is a good thing.

Here are six of the most prominent myths about drinking water, followed by the icy cold truths:

6 myths about drinking water, debunked

Myth: Drinking lots of water will curb your appetite.
Fact: The only weight-loss benefit of drinking lots of water is that it keeps your mouth too busy to eat.

As part of coverage on the "Top 10 Fitness Myths," Fitness magazine experts crushed the dieting myth that drinking lots of water makes you less hungry. "Sorry to tell you this," the Fitness editors wrote. "You may eat less, because you're too busy trucking back and forth between the bathroom and dinner table, but that's about it."

Myth: You might be thirsty when you think you're hungry.
Fact: You're probably hungry when you think you're hungry.

While boredom, habit or stress might make you eat when you're not hungry, your body is unlikely to mix up hunger and thirst, Penn State nutrition professor Barbara Rolls, Ph.D., told Health.com. The sensations aren't even similar. "They feel different and are regulated by separate mechanisms in your body," Rolls said. When you need hydration, cell and blood volumes tank, giving you an unpleasantly dry, tacky-feeling mouth. There's little chance you'll mistake that for the sensation of hunger, which takes cues from gut hormones, nutrients and glucose and is signaled with a rumbling stomach and a sensation of emptiness.

Myth: You need to chugalug water constantly or risk imminent dehydration.
Fact: A healthy diet and drinking when you're thirsty will hydrate you just fine.

There's no need to constantly gulp down water, according to Rolls. As she told Health.com, the moisture in food alone provides about 20 percent of the fluid you need. Instead of randomly chugging water throughout the day, Rolls recommended avoiding dry foods like heavily processed crackers and filling up on hydrating produce like cucumbers, which are 97 percent water. Do that and drink water when you're thirsty, and your hydration levels should be fine, Rolls said.

Myth: You can overhydrate easily.
Fact: It's unusual to drink too much water.

People commonly worry about the risk of drinking too much water, but that's low on the list of concerns, said Nicole G. Morgan, a registered dietitian and nutritionist who practices in Atlanta.
She said overhydrating is much more difficult than most people think. "You would have to consume your full water requirement for the day in a short time frame for it to become dangerous." To avoid even this slight danger of drinking too much water, Morgan recommended spreading out an increase in water intake over the course of a day. "That approach to hydration is generally regarded as safe and healthy," she said.

Myth: Bottled water fortified with electrolytes is healthier.
Fact: Most Americans don't need fortified drinks.

In a 2015   evaluation of coconut water and other sports drinks, Consumer Reports concluded that most Americans don't need fortified bottled water. The consumer watchdog noted that the labels on the drinks said they contained added electrolytes, minerals that help regulate muscle function and water balance, which can be lost during long intense workouts. CR then concluded that few people in America exercise so vigorously as to need to replenish electrolytes. 
CR also quoted Leslie Bonci, a dietitian and director of sports nutrition at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, who said, "Any liquid is going to be hydrating, even coffee. Do vitamins and minerals add to hydration? No. What's hydrating is the fluid."

Myth: Everyone needs eight 8-ounce glasses of water a day.
Fact: There's no basic rule about how much water you need to stay hydrated.

This is one of the most widespread myths about drinking water, but on closer examination it really doesn't hold up, according to diet and nutrition experts at Consumer Reports on Health in a recent report on "How to Stay Hydrated." They noted that an appropriate amount of water per day can vary "a good bit" from person to person. In general, people who are heavier or taller or more active need to take in more water to cover their losses. In addition, hot or humid weather might increase a person's need for water intake.
 To make sure you get enough water, CR experts recommended taking these steps:

  • Drink before you feel parched. 
  • Sip small amounts throughout the day, instead of worrying about downing a full glass of water all at once.
  • Carry a water bottle with you so you can drink when you're thirsty.
  • Remember that all beverages count towards hydration, except for the ones that contain alcohol.
Even caffeinated drinks count towards hydration, Janet Mentes, Ph.D., a professor at the UCLA School of Nursing, told CR. While coffee and tea and some sodas are mild diuretics that can cause you to urinate more often, they add more to your liquid stores than you'll lose from extra urination, she said.

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Lose the belly pooch: 7 do’s and don’ts to accomplish a flat stomach 

Published: Friday, August 18, 2017 @ 4:15 PM
Updated: Tuesday, January 23, 2018 @ 11:43 AM

Even after you've managed to drop some pounds, your stomach may still have a persistent pooch Fat in this location has been linked to an increased risk of serious issues With the Flat Belly Diet, reduce belly fat by increasing your consumption of monosaturated fatty acids The diet's emphasis on magnesium may reduce inflammation and the level of bad bacteria in your stomach In addition to taking a look at the Flat Belly Diet, consider these dietary changes to help reduce abdominal fat Peppermint and chamom

When you're trying to lose weight and get in shape, belly fat can be one of the hardest problems to address. 

Even after you've managed to drop some pounds, your stomach may still have a persistent pooch.

In addition to making it harder to get into your jeans, belly fat may also have a negative impact on your overall health. Fat in this location has been linked to an increased risk of serious issues such as diabetes, heart disease and some types of cancer.

RELATED: Considering the paleo diet? Here’s what you need to know

The Flat Belly Diet

If you're looking for a diet that helps you achieve a flat stomach, there's one designed just for that purpose – the Flat Belly Diet. Created by a former Prevention magazine editor and a registered dietitian, the diet aims to reduce belly fat by increasing your consumption of monounsaturated fatty acids. The diet's creators say these types of fats target abdominal fat and promote fullness, so you'll lose overall weight as well as belly fat.

You'll find monounsaturated fats in foods like olive oil, nuts, seeds and chocolate.

FILE — Sliced almonds (Karsten Moran/The New York Times)(KARSTEN MORAN/NYT)

WebMD doubts claims that the diet specifically targets belly fat, but the site’s experts note that if assists in overall weight loss, you should also lose belly fat. Dr. Oz, on the other hand, said that the diet may work. He touts the diet's emphasis on magnesium, which he says may reduce inflammation and the level of bad bacteria in your stomach. This type of bacteria has been linked to weight gain.

What to add to your diet

In addition to taking a look at the Flat Belly Diet, consider these dietary changes to help reduce abdominal fat.

 Peppermint and chamomile tea: These types of tea help ease digestion and help your body dissolve gas, which can reduce bloating, according to Health.com.

Constipation distends your belly, so a daily dose of fiber in the morning can keep your digestive system moving.. (AP Photo/David Duprey, File)

 Fiber-rich cereal: Constipation distends your belly, so a daily dose of fiber in the morning can keep your digestive system moving. Prevention.com says high-fiber cereals that contain two types of fiber – insoluble (from bran) and soluble (from psyllium) – are good choices.

 Yogurt: It contains probiotics, which can help balance the bacteria in your stomach and prevent bloating. Health.com says yogurt is also packed with protein, so it can help you feel full.

File photo. (Photo illustration by Joern Pollex/Getty Images)(Joern Pollex/Getty Images)

 Cucumbers: According to Health.com, cucumbers help reduce swelling and bloating due to their high water content and quercetin, a flavonoid antioxidant.

What to limit

 

Alcohol: Some types of alcohol are loaded with calories. According to Time.com, these calories can't be stored for later, so your metabolism has to focus on the alcohol rather than on burning fat.


Sodium: Sodium makes you retain water, which increases your belly bloat. Stop salting your food, but also look at the salt content on pre-packaged foods, which are an even greater source of sodium for most people, according to Prevention.com.

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5 questions every woman in her 40s should ask her doctor

Published: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 10:36 AM

Women are waiting longer on average to have babies. Now there’s a push for women in their 20s and 30s to spend thousands of dollars to have their eggs stored. So they can improve their chances for pregnancy later in life. Freezing tiny embryos is also an option. At Reproductive Biology Associates, a fertility clinic in Atlanta, lab workers fertilize patients’ eggs, one by one, with sperm. This lab worker uses a tube and the suction of her breath to hold the material in place for the delicate pro

Women who are in their 40s are in many cases reaching a new stage in their lives. Your children may be more independent, and you might have a well-established career. It can also be a time of change, when it's easier to gain weight, and you may start to see the first signs of menopause.

»RELATED: 4 questions every woman in her 30s should ask her doctor

Being informed about the changes you may face during your 40s is an important way to protect your health for many years to come. It pays to have regular checkups and discuss any potential issues or concerns with your doctor. In addition, you may want to undergo some health screenings to confirm or rule out problems that may be more common after age 40.

The following are five questions every woman in her 40s should ask her doctor:

What supplements should I take?

It's common for women in their 40s to be deficient in nutrients such as vitamin D, according to DoctorOz.com, so it's important to ask your doctor if you should be taking any supplements. This vitamin helps your body absorb calcium, which protects against osteoporosis-related bone loss – a particular concern as you get older.

A blood test can check your vitamin D levels, and if they're low, you may be advised stop smoking, start resistance training and add a supplement to your daily routine.

Should I be tested for diabetes?

Your risk of developing type 2 diabetes increases with age, especially after you're 45, according to Healthline. A blood test can determine whether your body is using insulin efficiently enough to help your body maintain consistent blood glucose levels.

You're at particular risk of developing type 2 diabetes if you're overweight, have a family history of the disease or have a history of gestational diabetes. If you have this disease, you're at an increased risk of developing heart disease, blindness and depression.

How can I control my weight?

Women's metabolism slows after age 40, and as a result, you'll need to eat less and exercise in order to maintain the same weight, according to DoctorOz.com. You may also have hypothyroidism – an underactive thyroid gland that can result in weight gain. If you're gaining weight, it's worth asking your doctor about, especially if you have dry skin, feel tired and are less able to tolerate cold temperatures.

Your doctor can treat hypothyroidism and also suggest an appropriate fitness plan that takes into account your age, weight and health history.

Should I keep taking birth control pills?

If you're in your 40s, you may think you've left your child-bearing years behind, but that's not necessarily true. Unless you've been menopausal for more than a year, you'll still need to take birth control. The second highest rate of unintended pregnancy is for sexually active women who are age 40 to 50, JoAnn Pinkerton, executive director of The North American Menopause Society, told the Chicago Tribune.

Doctors have differing opinions on whether you should keep taking birth control pills after age 40, so talk to your doctor to find out what form of contraception he or she recommends for you.

What about menopause?

You may not be thinking about menopause yet, but it's normal for this process to occur at any age from 40 to 59, according to familydoctor.org. For an indication about when this might happen, look to when the older women in your family reached menopause. Although this can influence when you enter menopause, it's not guaranteed.

After menopause, your body produces less estrogen, and this may increase your risk of heart disease, the American Heart Association says. Heart disease is the number-one threat to women's health. Talk to your doctor about symptoms that could indicate your may be headed toward menopause and whether hormone replacement therapy is recommended.

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'Tide Pod Challenge': Georgia teen among those sickened in dangerous trend

Published: Sunday, January 21, 2018 @ 6:04 AM

‘Tide Pod Challenge’ On Social Media Alarms Doctors, Parents Warned

Don’t do the Tide Pod Challenge. Seriously.

>> Watch the news report here

That’s the message poison control officials are urging people after a bizarre trend spread like wildfire online.

The challenge involves people popping the small laundry detergent packs in their mouths and posting videos online of themselves chewing and gagging on the oozing product.

Dozens of people have been taken to the hospital after doing the challenge. 

>> Doctors warn parents about dangerous 'Tide Pod Challenge'

Dr. Gaylord Lopez, the director of Georgia's Poison Control Center, confirmed to WSB-TV that the center has handled one case involving a teen.

“This year, we had a call about a 13-year-old. In fact, it was the mother who called us because the kid was getting sick and vomiting,” Lopez said.

While there's only been one confirmed “Tide Pod Challenge” case in Georgia, Lopez said this is a good reminder about the dangers of detergent pods in general.

There are still hundreds of children under the age of 5 getting sick from them.

“When you’ve got a young child picking up a packet, like I have in my hand, thinking it might be candy or food, you could see why kids are attracted to them,” Lopez said.

>> Read more trending news 

Lopez also wants parents to be aware of the latest social media craze.

“Parents need to know that if their young teens are getting into them, they can easily have problems ranging from just mild upset of the stomach to this stuff getting into their lungs and causing far more problems,” Lopez said.

Last week, YouTube and Facebook announced they are removing “Tide Pod Challenge” videos from their sites.