20 reasons why September might be the best festival month of the year

Published: Monday, September 04, 2017 @ 6:00 AM

A look at some of our favorite Dayton-area fall festivals.

September is full of festival fun! Mark your calendars for these festivals in Dayton or closeby.

>> Eat your way through September at these food events

The Ohio Renaissance Festival offers nine weekends of festival fun from September through the end of October. CONTRIBUTED

OHIO RENAISSANCE FESTIVAL

Sept. 2-Oct.29, Saturdays & Sundays, Sept. 2-Oct. 29 at Ohio Renaissance Festival, 10542 E. State Route 73, Waynesville.

Guests can step back in time in a 30-acre re-created 16th Century English village. The festival features nearly 100 shows daily on 12 stages, over 150 unique arts and crafts shops, food and drink, games of skill and human-powered rides to amuse all ages.

>> 5 things to love about the Renaissance Festival

It’s an annual feast at the Dayton Greek Festival. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO(Contributing Writer)

DAYTON GREEK FESTIVAL

Sept. 8-10, 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Friday & Saturday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday at Greek Orthodox Church, 500 Belmonte Park N., Dayton.

Authentic Greek food and patries, imports, jewelry, Greek Dancing, children’s activities, live Greek music, church tours, and free shuttle bus.

>> The festivals we cannot wait for

ANNUAL EGYPTIAN FESTIVAL

Sept. 8-10, 4-9 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday at St. Mina and St. Abanoub Church, 1531 King Richard Parkway, Miamisburg.

Enjoy the exquisite flavors of Egypt, shop for Egyptian jewelry, arts & crafts; live entertainment, raffle pries, carnival rides, face painting and more.

VANDALIA SISTER CITIES OKTOBERFEST

Sept. 8-9, 6-11 p.m. Friday & 12-11 p.m. Saturday at Vandalia Recreation Center, 1111 Stonequarry Road, Vandalia.

German bands, Bratwurst and Mettwurst, German Potato Salad, pretzels, beer, arts & crafts, children’s games and more. No pets allowed.

>> 4 Oktoberfest events we can’t wait for this fall

(Tom Gilliam Photography for Dayton.com)

ITALIAN FALL FESTA

Sept. 8-10, 6-11 p.m. Friday, 12-11 p.m. Saturday, 12-8 p.m. Sunday at Bella Villa Hall, 2625 County Line Road, Dayton. Weekend of Italian music, Italian food, and a fun game of Bocce on the spacious grounds of Bella Villa. Free admission and parking. Shuttle service from the Reynolds & Reynolds parkinglot.

SPRINGBORO OKTOBERFEST

Sept. 8-9, Opens at 5 p.m. Friday & 11 a.m. Saturday at Springboro United Church of Christ, 5 W. Mill St., Springboro.

Celebration of authentic German food, beer, wine and entertainment for the entire family.

>> Why this year’s Springboro Oktoberfest will be bigger and better than ever

The Beavercreek Popcorn Festival, now in its 29th year, takes place the weekend after Labor Day on Sept. 12 and 13.  (Source: Provided by the Beavercreek Popcorn Festival)

BEAVERCREEK POPCORN FESTIVAL
September 9-10, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday at the intersection of Dayton-Xenia and North Fairfield roads, Beavercreek.

Festival foods, continuous live entertainment, 5K popcorn run, treats, special services, creative crafts and specialties made with popcorn. Also, children’s area with games, inflatables, contests and other activities.

WAYNESVILLE SECOND SATURDAY STREET FAIRE

Sept. 9, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Waynesville, 97 S. Main St., Waynesville.

Festival includes Artists Booths where artists, crafters and authors display and sell their creations. Over 40 artisans will feature everything from woodworking to fiber arts. Local entertainers will perform in the Main Street Gazebo and other locations around town.

XENIA COMMUNITY FESTIVAL

Sept. 15-16, 4-9 p.m. Friday & 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday at Shawnee Park, 591 South Park Dr., Xenia.

Paddleboats on the lake, food, vendors, a parade, free entertainment and the return of field day for kids are part of the festival.

Pigs, Pork chops and People were all plentyful Saturday at the Preble County Pork Festival in Eaton, Ohio. In it's 41st year the festival will cater to 100,000 visitors a day. With over 500 crafters, food vendors and even pig races there is something for everyone.(Martin Wheeler III)

PREBLE COUNTY PORK FESTIVAL

Sept. 16-18, 6:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. each day at Preble County Fairgrounds, 722 S. Franklin St., Eaton.

Lots of pork inspired food, over 400 arts and crafts vendors, parade, live pig displays, hands-on activities and cooking demonstrations, camel and pony rides, petting zoo and more. No pets, please.

ANNUAL WOOL GATHERING SHOW

Sept.16-17, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday & 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday at Young’s Jersey Dairy, 6880 Springfield-Xenia Road, Yellow Springs.

Observe sheep, llamas, alpacas, cashmere goats, Angora rabbits and other wool-bearing animals at the show. There will be shearing demonstrations, wool spinning, weaving and much more to see and learn. More than 100 vendors from several states.

Daytonians of Hispanic heritage joined the rest of the Gem City's international community in a day of fun, food, music and education at the 16th Annual Hispanic Heritage Festival on Saturday, Aug. 20. (TOM GILLIAM/CONTRIBUTED)

HISPANIC HERITAGE FESTIVAL

Sept.16, 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. at RiverScape MetroPark, 111 E. Monument Ave., Dayton.

Featuring a parade, live Latin music and authentic Latin food, cultural performances and activities for the entire family.

POLISH FALL FESTIVAL

Sept.17, 3-7 p.m.; Gates open at 1 p.m. at Polish Picnic Grounds, 3690 Needmore Road, Dayton.

Featuring food & beverages, dancing, games and music, including Randy Krajewski and his polka band. No coolers, please.

ARTFEST

Sept. 17, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Beavercreek Community Park, 760 Factory Road, Beavercreek.

ArtFest is a creative festival with local artists of all genres, performers and Miami Valley food trucks. Visitors can help create ‘hands on’ art installation projects, shop for homemade items and enjoy stage and strolling performances by musicians and artists. Parking is available at Nutter Park on Factory Road with direct access to the bike path leading to the festival.

The 2009 Tipp City Mum Festival was held this weekend in Tipp City. The Tipp City Mum Festival started in 1959 which makes it the oldest festival in the Miami County. Mum is an abbreviation of Chrysanthemum, a hearty fall flower.(Jim Noelker)

TIPP CITY MUM FESTIVAL

Sept. 22-24, 4-10 p.m. Friday, all day Saturday & Sunday at Third Street, Tipp City.

Friday night Cruise-in, Saturday the Mum Festival Parade followed by festival activities at the City Park, Sunday festival activities. Live entertainment both Saturday and Sunday.

Scenes from Dayton Art Institute's Oktoberfest, which took place Sept. 24-25, 2016. PHOTOS BY TOM GILLIAM, CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

OKTOBERFEST AT DAYTON ART INSTITUTE

Sept. 23-24, 12-11 p.m. Saturday; 12-7 p.m. Sunday at Dayton Art Institute, 456 Belmonte Park North, Dayton.

Presented by Miller Lite, the community event includes artisans, unique international foods, selection of domestic, international and craft beers, family-friendly art activities, live music, a Weingarten with a variety of international wines and more. There will also be a fully covered main stage viewing area, an expanded craft beer tent with big-screen TV’s to view football, and live music on two stages throughout the weekend.

The second day of Apple Fest took place at Aullwood Audubon Farm. The event included animals, games, live music and various types of food.(Ron Alvey)

AULLWOOD APPLE FEST

Sept. 23-24, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday & Sunday at Aullwood Audubon Farm, 9101 Frederick Pike, Dayton.

Featuring food, live entertainment, free children’s activities, meet farm animal friends, tractor or draft horse pulled wagon rides and more. A variety of artisans and craft exhibitors will offer soaps, jewelry, woven items, sand art, garden ornaments, etc.

HERITAGE OF FLIGHT FESTIVAL

Sept. 29-October 1, Friday, 2-11 p.m., Saturday, 7 a.m. to 11 p.m., Sunday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at Main Street, New Carlisle.

Featuring the Annual Parade of Planes, and an array of events and activities on Main Street.

Apples for sale at the Black Barn booth during the Country Applefest in downtown Lebanon Saturday, Sept. 28, 2013. NICK DAGGY / STAFF(www.todayspulse.com)

COUNTRY APPLEFEST

Sept. 30, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. at Warren County Fairgrounds, 665 N. Broadway, Lebanon.

Fairgrounds will be filled with homemade crafts, food and entertainment. On-site free parking and handicap access.

HUBER HEIGHTS FAMILY FALL FESTIVAL

Sept. 30-Oct. 1, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., Saturday and Sunday at Chambersburg and Brandt Pike, Huber Heights.

Featuring food, music, fall crafts, 2-day cruise-in, bands, hay rides, pony rides, bouncy house, face painting and more.

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Score some amazing vinyl for your collection at the Dayton Record Fair

Published: Thursday, September 14, 2017 @ 6:00 AM
Updated: Thursday, February 08, 2018 @ 6:00 AM

The Dayton Record Fair was held Saturday, Feb. 25 at the Yellow Cab in downtown Dayton. PHOTO / TOM GILLIAM PHOTOGRAPHY
The Dayton Record Fair was held Saturday, Feb. 25 at the Yellow Cab in downtown Dayton. PHOTO / TOM GILLIAM PHOTOGRAPHY

The allure of vinyl records endures much like an old school crush, for better or worse. This once-pronounced dead media has risen from the ashes to serve far more than a niche audience. 

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According to Billboard, vinyl sales have increased more than 250 percent in the last eight years. 

>> 10 popular hip-hop songs that sample Dayton funk music

Capitalizing on that rising tide is Dayton’s record fair, happening Saturday, Feb. 10 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Yellow Cab Building, 700 E. 4th St. 

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The event is presented by the new Skeleton Dust Records, co-owned by Luke Tandy, and Cincinnati’s Northside Record Fair. The Drunken Waffle food truck will be serving, and DJs include James Downing, Jack Davidson and Tim Dylan.

>> Skeleton Dust Records opens in downtown Dayton 

Vendors include Ron House, Rob Coyle, Torn Light Records, Greg Biggs, Vinyl Shock Records, Jorin Edgerly, Leroy Purcey, Neil Sharrow, Jeff Bruce, Rob Kopfer, Jon Lorenz, Steve Spatt, John Papanek, Greg Durica, Doug Smith, Paul Tescher, Jeremy Wright, Scott Ferguson, Scott Simpson, Tim Rawlings, Jaren Lykens, Skeleton Dust Records, Mike Inlow and Jay Madewell. 

>> NEW DETAILS: Restaurant eviction lawsuit at The Greene is escalating

The Dayton Record Fair was held Saturday, Feb. 25 at the Yellow Cab in downtown Dayton. PHOTO / TOM GILLIAM PHOTOGRAPHY

>> The 12 best restaurants in the Dayton area

That’s more than 20 vendors from Dayton and throughout the Midwest who will be offering up more than just vinyl. Tapes, CDs, T-shirts, posters and more will be up for grabs as DJs spin music from various genres throughout the day. If you’re a hardcore collector, you can buy an early bird pass to get first dibs an hour ahead of the rest. 

>> 8 Dayton acts you should give a funk about

WHAT WE SCORED FOR $20

This got us thinking about Dayton’s own record store, Omega Music, located at 318 E. Fifth St., which offers deals on vinyl year round. Say you had $20 on you just burning a hole in your pocket? What could you get for that Andrew Jackson? Here’s what we found on a trip to the store.

ELVIS PRESLEY 

“The Wonder of You”/“Mama Liked the Roses”

$2.99

(Jim Ingram)

Written by Baker Knight and recorded by several, including Ray Peterson, Ronnie Hilton and the Platters, “The Wonder of You” had long been a hit by the time The King released a live version in 1970. Elvis’ was the highest-charted version, reaching #9 — as did the B-side “Mama Liked the Roses”.

>>You have to see this local woman’s massive Elvis collection

GEORGE CARLIN

Take-Offs and Put-Ons

$4.99

(Jim Ingram)

This particular album is a bit misleading, based solely on the cover. Originally released as the iconic comic’s second stand-up album in 1967, it was re-released with an entirely different cover in 1972, following the smash success of his FM & AM album, which won a Grammy Award that same year. 

>> Did you know George Carlin has Dayton connections?

LOUIS JORDAN

I Believe In Music

$4.99

(Jim Ingram)

Louis Jordan was once called “The King of the Jukebox” for the hits he churned out in the 1940s. Songs like “Is You Is or Is You Ain’t My Baby?”, “Caldonia Caldonia” and “Saturday Night Fish Fry” were considered early influences on rock ‘n’ roll’s pioneers. Though not as in demand by the time I Believe in Music was released in 1973, Jordan was still a name. However, it would be his final album, as he died just 15 months later.

WINGS

“Silly Love Songs”/“Cook of the House”

$3.99

(Jim Ingram)

It’s an admittedly sappy pick, but its melody is hard to shake. Paul McCartney told Billboard Magazine in 2001 he didn’t write “Silly Love Songs” as a way of thumbing his nose to critics who deemed him too soft, contrary to popular belief. He simply loved love songs. Tough to argue with a master about his methods. McCartney’s late wife, Linda, shared writing credits on the B-side.

>>Rose Music Center more than $800k ahead in ticket revenue

BILLY PRESTON

“I Wrote a Simple Song”/“Outa-Space”

$1.99

(Jim Ingram)

Speaking of former Beatles, Billy Preston — who played on the Get Back sessions and was among several considered as a “Fifth Beatle” — thought his funky 1972 instrumental “Outa-Space” would be a hit. However, the suits at A&M Records made “I Wrote a Simple Song” the A-side. But enterprising DJs discovered the B-side anyway, making “Outa-Space” a huge hit, while its lead single skimmed the lower end of the Billboard Hot 100.

The total comes to $18.95 (before tax), leaving you with some excellent finds for a little bit of cash.

WANT TO GO?

What: Dayton Record Fair

When: Saturday, Feb. 12, 11 a.m.-4 p.m.

Where: Yellow Cab Building, 700 E. Fifth St., Dayton

Cost: $5 ($10 for early bird tickets)

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These EPIC displays from the Ohio Chinese Lantern Festival will take your breath away

Published: Thursday, December 14, 2017 @ 6:00 AM

Chinese Lantern Festival

You’ve never seen holiday lights like THIS before! 

(Well, unless you went last year, of course!)

The Ohio Chinese Lantern Festival has returned to the Ohio Expo Center and State Fairgrounds with brand new light sculptures, more exciting performances and more cultural experiences. 

>> How to go to the Ohio Chinese Lantern Festival this year

It’s definitely worth the drive to take part in this enchanting and immersive cultural experience. 

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The 200-foot-long Chinese dragon (which, for some context, is longer than four school buses) has returned this year. New this year is a group of color-changing dinosaurs that are 3 stories high. Together, with an additional 35 sets of whole new lights, the lanterns illuminate the fairgrounds. 

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Still need some convincing? Take a look for yourself. 

Ohio Chinese Lantern Festival is returning to the Expo Center with bigger and brighter lights this winter!(Allegra Czerwinski)

Ohio Chinese Lantern Festival is returning to the Expo Center with bigger and brighter lights this winter!(Allegra Czerwinski)

Ohio Chinese Lantern Festival is returning to the Expo Center with bigger and brighter lights this winter!(Allegra Czerwinski)

Ohio Chinese Lantern Festival is returning to the Expo Center with bigger and brighter lights this winter!(Allegra Czerwinski)

Ohio Chinese Lantern Festival is returning to the Expo Center with bigger and brighter lights this winter!(Allegra Czerwinski)

Ohio Chinese Lantern Festival is returning to the Expo Center with bigger and brighter lights this winter!(Allegra Czerwinski)

Ohio Chinese Lantern Festival is returning to the Expo Center with bigger and brighter lights this winter!(Allegra Czerwinski)

Ohio Chinese Lantern Festival is returning to the Expo Center with bigger and brighter lights this winter!(Allegra Czerwinski)

Believe us when we say to witness these incredible lantern displays in person is far more breathtaking. 

The festival will light up the Natural Resources Park at the Ohio State Expo Center and Fairgrounds, located at 717 E. 17th Ave., Columbus from Nov. 17, 2017 to Jan. 7, 2018. 

It’s open nightly from 5:30-10:00 p.m with the ticket booth opening at 5 p.m. and closing at 9:30 p.m.

Tickets range from $10-15 per person, and will be available for purchase at the festival entrance, or online at ohiolanternfestival.com. There are also family 4-packs available for $40 and a special VIP package for $25 per person. 

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Macy’s Day Parade 2017: 5 things to know about the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade

Published: Thursday, November 23, 2017 @ 10:54 AM
Updated: Thursday, November 23, 2017 @ 10:54 AM

Macys Thanksgiving Day Parade - 5 Fast Facts

There are a number of things associated with Thanksgiving− turkey, pilgrims, big dinners and family. One of them is the tradition of the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade.

RELATED: The least and most affordable places to spend your holiday vacation

Since 1924, Macy's has helped thousands of families celebrate the holidays with its annual parade. 

If you plan to travel to New York to see the spectacle for yourself this year or will be tuning in, here are five things to know about the parade:

Spider-Man at the Macy's Thanksgiving Day parade in New York.(Mike Coppola/Getty Images)

Where is the parade route and where can I view it?

The parade steps off at 9 a.m. sharp from 77th Street and Central Park West and travels south. Once the procession hits Columbus Circle, it turns east onto Central Park South and marches until turning south again onto 6th Avenue. The parade continues south until reaching 34th Street, where it turns west and ends at 7th Avenue. The last of the balloons and performers touch 7th Avenue around noon.

(Macy’s)

While there is no seating available for the public, anyone is welcome to bring blankets or chairs and find a spot along the parade route at no charge. Since these spots are first-come, first-serve, some families camp out several hours before the parade begins. Plan to arrive early to snag good seats.

Many regular parade-goers recommend avoiding Macy's official parade viewing area on 34th Street, since it's the most crowded. One balloon handler on Reddit suggested that Columbus Circle also might not be a good viewing area, since the winds are more unpredictable and the procession moves more quickly through that spot. He added that the first few blocks south of 77th Street tend to attract smaller crowds because that street is farther from the train stations.

What is included in the parade procession?

In addition to more than two dozen inflated balloons, the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade features floats, clowns, performers and marching bands from across the country. The Peanuts gang appear on their float, Snoopy's Doghouse, alongside McDonald's Big Red Shoe, Mount Rushmore, Winter Wonderland by Delta Airlines and more, including Macy's many floats.

Macy's website also lists the participating clown troupes with themes like Breakfast Clowns, Arrsome Pirates and Viking Clowns. Marching bands in the procession include several high schools and colleges, the U.S. Air Force, New York Police Department, and, of course, Macy's Great American Marching Band.

In addition to the parade procession, the event features performances that are held in the official Macy's viewing area on 34th Street. Check the Macy's website for updates to the lineup and more information on these performances.

The Harrison High School Marching Band from Kennesaw performed Thursday, Nov. 24, 2016 in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade.(Jim Galloway / AJC)

Is Macy's unveiling anything special this year?

Among Macy's novelty balloons is a special tribute that deserves recognition. As a nod to the 70th anniversary of "Miracle on 34th Street," Macy's is recreating "Harold the Baseball Player," a balloon that was featured in the classic black-and-white film set in New York.

Though the original balloon appeared in full color during the 1946 Macy's Thanksgiving Parade, the recreation is black, white and gray as a throwback to the movie, which was shot on location and featured the parade. 

Can I see the balloons outside of the parade?

All of the balloons are inflated on Wednesday, November 22, and the event is open to the public. Head to Central Park West between 77th Street and 81st Street, near the American Museum of Natural History.

The balloons are inflated between 3 and 10 p.m., but the bulk of them are done in the evening, so it's best to be late to this event.

What if I can't get to New York?

If you can't get to the Empire State for Thanksgiving, there are still plenty of ways to experience the parade in your pajamas. Watch the procession at 9 a.m. EST on NBC to see the balloons, floats and performers without fighting any crowds.

For a behind-the-scenes experience, Macy's has created a series of 360° videos that take the viewer on a tour of its parade studio. See the magic behind the Thanksgiving tradition and learn about how the balloons are made, from sketch to inflation.

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How one of Dayton's biggest dinner parties of the year came to be

Published: Tuesday, November 24, 2015 @ 12:00 AM
Updated: Tuesday, November 24, 2015 @ 12:00 AM

In 1969 Arthur Beerman hosted the largest dinner party the city had ever seen: a turkey feast. It was the first Beerman Annual Thanksgiving Day Dinner.

In 1969 Arthur Beerman hosted the largest dinner party the city had ever seen: a turkey feast.

 

It was the first Beerman Annual Thanksgiving Day Dinner.

The first Beerman Thanksgiving dinner for the community was held in 1969 at Wampler Ballarena.. DAYTON DAILY NEWS FILE
 

The founder of Elder-Beerman Stores Corp. had suffered a heart attack earlier that year and received mountains of cards from well-wishers. He returned thanks by starting what became one of Dayton’s most endearing traditions. He put Jeanne Betty Weiner in charge.

 

Beerman had just been discharged from the hospital when Weiner got tasked with the job.

Jeanne Betty Weiner, pictured in 2007, carried out Arthur Beerman's vision to throw a dinner party for the "hungry, the lonely and the needy." DAYTON DAILY NEWS ARCHIVE(Contributed photo)
 

He told her: “You are the only person crazy enough to do what I want,” said Weiner in a 2015 interview, then the store’s radio and television spokeswoman.

 

>>> PHOTOS: Beerman Annual Thanksgiving Day Dinner through the years

 

Weiner got little instruction beyond that the dinner had to be the same as the one Beerman enjoyed at his own house on Thanksgiving.

 

Weiner, who now lives in Sarasota, Florida, said she told Beerman she would be happy to orchestrate his dinner for the “hungry, the lonely and the needy.”

 

She found a caterer who would cook the food, arranged to have the event held at Wampler’s Ball-Arena and found musicians who donated their talent to perform big band music on the holiday. “I wanted it to be a fun party,” she said.

Denise Kelly and her daughter Arlane, 4, and nephews Jamahl and Avon Stokes enjoy the 1990 Beerman Thanksgiving dinner. DAYTON DAILY NEWS ARCHIVE
 

More than 3,000 people attended that first year. School buses picked up the guests in downtown Dayton and drove them to the event where they were welcomed by volunteers. “They were greeted just like they were coming into someone’s home,” said Weiner.

 

More than 1,300 pounds of turkey, 500 pies, 90 gallons of gravy and 90 steam pans of dressing were served that first year. Clowns entertained the children and folks danced to the Hal Harris band.

 

“It hit the national news,” said Weiner. “There was nothing like it in the country. Someone giving a private party for thousands of people was just an amazing thing,” she said.

 

“The dinner was delicious and the music was wonderful,” she said. “It was what he wanted it to be — a good party.

In 1977, Bertha Allen, 88, said she had attended all nine of the Beerman Thanksgiving dinners to date. DAYTON DAILY NEWS ARCHIVE
 

Beerman told Weiner he would continue the Thanksgiving dinner and wanted it to grow. He died the next year but his family and The Beerman Foundation kept the tradition going.

 

In 1988 organizers moved the event to the convention center downtown to reach more people in need. In 2008 the foundation ended the observance after serving more than 200,000 turkey dinners in 40 years.

 

The annual feast found new sponsorship the following year. In recent years volunteers served at each event more than 8,000 guests 2,800 pounds of turkey, one ton each of potatoes, green beans and stuffing and 1,000 sliced pies.

 
“Every Thanksgiving I still think about what a wonderful thing the dinner is. I think it’s remarkable it is still continued today,” said Weiner. “I still think of it as mine and Arthur’s wonderful party.”
 

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