The History of Black History

Published: Wednesday, February 01, 2012 @ 9:08 AM
Updated: Wednesday, February 01, 2012 @ 9:08 AM

The History of Black History

Americans have recognized black history annually since 1926, first as "Negro History Week" and later as "Black History Month." What you might not know is that black history had barely begun to be studied-or even documented-when the tradition originated. Although blacks have been in America at least as far back as colonial times, it was not until the 20th century that they gained a respectable presence in the history books.

Blacks Absent from History Books

We owe the celebration of Black History Month, and more importantly, the study of black history, to Dr. Carter G. Woodson. Born to parents who were former slaves, he spent his childhood working in the Kentucky coal mines and enrolled in high school at age twenty. He graduated within two years and later went on to earn a Ph.D. from Harvard. The scholar was disturbed to find in his studies that history books largely ignored the black American population-and when blacks did figure into the picture, it was generally in ways that reflected the inferior social position they were assigned at the time.

Established Journal of Negro History

Woodson, always one to act on his ambitions, decided to take on the challenge of writing black Americans into the nation's history. He established the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History (now called the Association for the Study of Afro-American Life and History) in 1915, and a year later founded the widely respected Journal of Negro History. In 1926, he launched Negro History Week as an initiative to bring national attention to the contributions of black people throughout American history.

Woodson chose the second week of February for Negro History Week because it marks the birthdays of two men who greatly influenced the black American population, Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln. However, February has much more than Douglass and Lincoln to show for its significance in black American history. For example:
  • February 23, 1868:
    W. E. B. DuBois, important civil rights leader and co-founder of the NAACP, was born.
  • February 3, 1870:
    The 15th Amendment was passed, granting blacks the right to vote.
  • February 25, 1870:
    The first black U.S. senator, Hiram R. Revels (1822-1901), took his oath of office.
  • February 12, 1909:
    The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) was founded by a group of concerned black and white citizens in New York City.
  • February 1, 1960:
    In what would become a civil-rights movement milestone, a group of black Greensboro, N.C., college students began a sit-in at a segregated Woolworth's lunch counter.
  • February 21, 1965:
    Malcolm X, the militant leader who promoted Black Nationalism, was shot to death by three Black Muslims.

Kidnapping survivor Elizabeth Smart shows off new baby

Published: Sunday, May 28, 2017 @ 11:46 AM

Kidnapping survivor Elizabeth Smart is pictured here in an appearance on the ‘Today’ show in 2013. Smart and her husband, Matthew Gilmour, have welcomed a new baby boy to their family.
NBC NewsWire/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images

Kidnapping survivor Elizabeth Smart has posted photos of her new baby boy on Instragram.

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The photos feature her husband Matthew Gilmour, daughter Chloe, 2, and newborn son James.

“These people are my whole world,” Smart wrote in a caption of a family portrait. “Whenever I look at them I realize how fortunate I am. I hope I never forget what a blessing a safe, healthy, happy family is.”

Earlier this month, the proud parents took baby James to get a “special blessing.”

“The sunshine made today the perfect day for an adventure with great Granny and Grandpa, and great uncle Neville!” she wrote in a photo caption of the family visiting with Gilmour’s parents in Scotland, where he’s from.

Another photo shows Chloe and James snuggling.

“Nothing better then seeing my two babies love on each other!” Smart wrote.

Smart was kidnapped from her bedroom in her home in Salt Lake City in 2002 when she was 14 by a homeless man, who her father had employed as a handy man, and his wife. She was rescued nine months later by police just 18 miles from the family home. 

Suspect, Brian David Mitchell, and his wife, Wanda Ileen Barzee, were eventually convicted in the Smart kidnapping and assault case. 

 

 

Gal Gadot, Lynda Carter meet at ‘Wonder Woman’ premiere

Published: Sunday, May 28, 2017 @ 7:28 AM

Actors Gal Gadot and Lynda Carter embrace at the premiere of Warner Bros. Pictures'

Two are more wonderful than one.

Gal Gadot and Lynda Carter met, embraced and posed for photographs at Thursday’s premiere of “Wonder Woman” in Hollywood, ETOnline reported.

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Carter, 65, made the Wonder Woman character famous during its television series run from 1975 to 1979. Gadot is starring in the movie version, which debuts nationally on June 2. The two women reunited at the Pantages Theatre, along with the film’s director, Patty Jenkins.

"I am the bearer of the torch and now I'm passing it forward to Gal and to Patty," Carter told ET. "I spoke with Patty early on and I couldn't wait to meet Gal. The three of us share some sisterhood by living and breathing this character."

"I just love her very much so," Gadot told ET. "She is such a special women and a unique person and it's always great to see her, especially tonight where she's going to see the movie for the first time. And my heart is going crazy."

Carter admitted she was nervous before watching the film.

"I can't breathe. I am so excited," she said. "I really want you all to embrace this. This is another way to look at her. It doesn't mean to abandon me or abandon the way that I had her, the way that I played her. This is just another way to look at Wonder Woman.”

I'm in LA, so excited to be attending the premiere of the new Wonder Woman movie, directed by my friend, Patty Jenkins,...

Posted by Lynda Carter on Thursday, May 25, 2017

Jet owned by Elvis fetches $430,000 at auction

Published: Sunday, May 28, 2017 @ 3:39 AM

A plane once owned by Elvis Presley sold for $430,000 at auction on Saturday.
GWS Auctions Inc.

A red 1962 Lockheed Jetstar private jet once owned by Elvis Presley sold for $430,000 at a California auction featuring celebrity memorabilia on Saturday.

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The plane had been sitting on a New Mexico tarmac for 35 years before it was consigned for sale, GWS Auctions said. It was owned by Presley and his father, Vernon, according to Liveauctioneers.com.

The buyer was not disclosed, and auctioneer Brigitte Kruse told The Associated Press that she could not immediately release information about the buyer or the buyer’s plans for the plane.

GWS Auctions said Presley designed the interior of the plane, which sports gold-tone woodwork, red velvet seats, and red shag carpet. The jet no longer has an engine and its cockpit needs repair. Privately owned for the past 35 years, the jet has been sitting on a tarmac in Roswell, N.M., the auction house said. 

U2 makes post-concert stop at Whataburger in Houston 

Published: Sunday, May 28, 2017 @ 12:27 AM

Left to right,  The Edge, Bono, Larry Mullen Jr., and Adam Clayton of U2 perform in concert during The Joshua Tree Tour 2017 at NRG Stadium in Houston.
Rick Kern/WireImage

After another grueling concert on the road, U2 can be forgiven for acting in mysterious ways. The Irish rock ’n’ roll band finished their show in Houston on Wednesday night and decided to eat at a local Whataburger, KDFW reported.

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After arriving, members of the band posed for photographs with some police officers, including Adam Clayton, who was wearing a kimono.

Larry Mullen Jr. also posed in the photo. A Twitter user, Boomcha, posted “Meanwhile at Whataburger,” along with a photo of the police posing with band members.

There were no photos of Bono or Edge, but perhaps they still hadn’t found what they were looking for inside the fast food restaurant.