The Dana Show

Published: Friday, August 12, 2016 @ 12:16 PM
Updated: Friday, August 12, 2016 @ 12:16 PM

Dana hosts her award-winning, #1 rated, daily program from St. Louis and is on weeknights from 9 p.m. to Midnight on AM 1290 and News 95.7 FM News Talk Radio WHIO. 

Dana's original brand of young, punk-rock, conservative irreverence has found a fast-growing multi-media audience. She's feisty and fearless without being abrasive and shrill. 

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Meet the woman behind one of Dayton’s most beloved bakeries

Published: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 @ 6:00 AM

Dayton’s top 3 pick for Best of Dayton 2017 ‘Best Bakery’ category.

In 1982, Theresa Hammons was eight-and-a-half months pregnant with her first daughter, Ashley, when she and her husband Greg opened Ashley’s Pastry Shop in Oakwood.

Nestled in a building that has housed one bakery or another for more than 90 years, Ashley’s has been a household name in Dayton for generations when it comes to doughnuts, cakes, cookies and other fresh pastries. 

(Sarah Franks)

>> These cookies from Ashley’s Pastry Shop are so good that Allison Janney gets them delivered to the set

The key to the couple’s success is no secret at all. Sure, one Ashley’s butter cookie will give you an extra bounce in your step that will last the rest of the day. But most people in the community would agree that Theresa’s genuine kindness, which greets each person with who comes through the bakery’s door, is what has made the shop a local staple.

The building which houses Ashley's Pastry Shop has been home to bakeries for more than 90 years. From left to right, the shop has remained relatively unchanged throughout the years.(Sarah Franks)

Theresa met her husband, Greg, while they were both students at the University of Cincinnati, but moved to Detroit after graduation where Greg worked in the restaurant business. When the building on Park Ave. in Oakwood became vacant, the couple saw an opportunity to move back closer to family and jumped at it.

With Theresa’s marketing skills and Greg’s food production expertise, Theresa said they have been the perfect team ever since they opened shop. 

Ashley’s Pastry Shop won the Best of Dayton 2017 “Best Bakery” category, and Theresa Hammons is our Daytonian of the Week. 

>>Best of Dayton 2017 Winners:Food & Dining

🍩 What has been your biggest joy from running Ashley’s Pastry Shop?

“From the little kids who are on their way to school in the morning stopping by to get a doughnut, or that stop by after school because they got a great grade on their project. We get to see the beginning of generations right here, right before our eyes. There’s people that come in every single day — we can set our watch to it. 

>> Daytonian of the Week: Chris Harmon, Town Hall Theatre

It’s really neat because we have people that come back to our bakery when they’re in town for class reunions or visiting family and they walk in and one of the first things they always say is, ‘Oh, it smells just like I remember.’ Because we are truly a bakery that still does all our baking on premise. So, when you open our doors, you smell the bakery, you smell the aromas in the oven and you see the activity in the back of the shop. It’s just a great testament to that things change in life— and my gosh everything changes so very much— but it’s so wonderful that there are things that remain the same.”

Ashley's Pastry Shop sells hundreds of dozens of Butterscotch Rolls every Thanksgiving and ships them all over the country to people who want an authentic taste of Dayton on their holiday plate.

🍩 You studied marketing in college. After 36 years, have you been able to learn the ins and outs of the actual baking side of the business?  

“I can really do just about everything. The thing about running a small business, especially one that is service-driven, there’s not really any definition of ‘this is my job description’ and ‘this is all I’m gonna do.’ I think that’s what enables me to love what I do as much as I do, because each day is so different. I may be mixing, pulling things in and out of the oven, then running deliveries and then cleaning the pans. 

Especially when you’re working in a small business as close as we are with our employees. They know me and my husband are going to be right there beside them working with them. It enables a great sense of employee relationship with us.”

🍩 Are you ever overwhelmed with being surrounded by so much sugar every day? 

“It’s like you get almost a sugar high in a way. It’s almost like over stimulation. I find that if I come in the morning, if I don’t start to nibble, then I’m ‘okay’ throughout the day. But if I come in and I have a little cookie, or bread, or danish— I just find myself not being able to stop the rest of the day. 

>> Daytonian of the Week: Charlynda Scales, founder of ‘Mutt’s Sauce’

🍩 What product are you and your husband most proud of creating? 

“I probably would have to say the Sand Tart cookie, just because it’s been like a connection that’s enabled us, you know, it’s been a staple of this bakery forever so it just reminds people of their past from so many years ago. Keep in mind, the Orville home is right at the top of this street here. So there’s a couple of things that we make that they would come and get (at one of the bakeries preceeding Ashley’s). Being in this bakery and imagining, ‘Oh gosh, Orville and Wilbur (shopped here).’ 

Also, the Cronut is a trademarked name, so we call ours glazed croissants. Very similar, but we were making them long before the gentleman in New York. We just didn’t trademark it.”

🍩 How does a bakery know when they’ve got a great doughnut? 

“Freshness is of course the best thing ... One of the things we’ve started to do when we were in business 36 years ago, is what we don’t sell in a given day, we donate to Catholic Social Services. Because we want our product, when someone’s buying it, to be the freshest it can be.”

>> 8 local doughnuts to indulge in

(Ashley's Pastry Shop Facebook)

🍩 Why Did you and your husband want to make giving back to the community such an important part of Ashley’s?

“We’re very fortunate that we have the ability to give back to the community that has been so tremendous to us and has supported us for the last 36 years. That was just a big committment that my husband and I made. When you make that delivery down to St. Vincent’s, or you connect with House of Bread...and you see the ounce of difference we can give in terms of a loaf of bread, or a dozen cookies, or a few coffee cakes— the difference it really makes in the lives of people that really aren’t that far from us. You don’t really have to go that far to realize the need is so prevalent right here in Dayton, Ohio. ... My husband and I have to have a passion about the organization and then we’re on board full force.” 

🍩 Dayton: why do you love it so much?

“What’s making Dayton great is when we all rally around each other and support one another. ... There is so much and I think so much of the time, we’re surrounded by great cities like Cincinnati, Indianapolis and Columbus — I think sometimes we forget to look at how great our backyard is.” Want to go? WHAT: Ashley’s Pastry ShopWHERE: 21 Park Ave., OakwoodINFO: ashleyspastries.com

 

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Daytonian of the Week: Andy Rowe, the ‘Mayor of Fifth Street’

Published: Wednesday, January 31, 2018 @ 6:00 AM

Daytonian of the Week Andy Rowe in front of a Siegfried and Roy statue in Las Vegas?
Photo: Courtesy of Andy Rowe
Daytonian of the Week Andy Rowe in front of a Siegfried and Roy statue in Las Vegas?(Photo: Courtesy of Andy Rowe)

His name may have never appeared on a ballot certified by the Montgomery County Board of Election, but  Andy Rowe, the bearded assistant manager of Blind Bob’s in the Oregon District, could certainly make a case for claiming the title “Mayor of Fifth Street.” 

Below we catch up with Andy, a key organizer of a bingo night at Bob’s in support of employees impacted by the recent fire at Salar Restaurant and Lounge, and who has been crowned Daytonian of the Week. 

>> How this Oregon District business raised $2K for its neighbors damaged by fire

The father of three said he organized the Salar fund-raiser because it was the Oregon District thing to do. 

“When Blind Bob's opened 10 years ago,  I was surprised that instead of being adversarial and territorial, all the neighboring restaurants and bars were amazingly supportive, and I wanted to pay that forward,” he told us. 

>> 10 reasons we love the Oregon District, and why you should, too

Daytonian of the Week Andy Rowe with two of his daughter and son, Scarlett, and Gabriel, 4. His stepdaughter, Zora, is 15 years old.(Photo: Courtesy of Andy Rowe)

Q) What do you do and how did you get involved in it? 

 

A) I have been the assistant general manager at Blind Bob's since we opened in August of 2008. My close friend Nate approached me about managing a bar his family was looking at opening, and I was enthralled with the opportunity to build something focused on providing things I love (good food, good beer and local music). I was also elected to the non-profit Oregon District Business Association board in July 2016 and have served as its secretary since January 2017. 

 

Q) What is your hidden talent? 

 

 A) Sleeping in. I've also been quietly teaching myself programming. Initially this was so I could make video games, but it actually led me toward my fascination with Bitcoin, which I've been obsessed with since 2013. 

 

Q) What do you love about life in Dayton? 

 

Andy Rowe and a friend Velentino Halton at Blind Bob's in the Oregon District.(Photo: Courtesy of Andy Rowe)

 A) Dayton is just small enough that most people are polite enough to still say hello to a stranger (when I'm in big cities it seems like nobody acknowledges people they don't know, even avoiding eye contact), yet Dayton is just big enough that there's always something new to discover, explore and do. 

 

Q) What would you do on a perfect date in Dayton? 

 

Daytonian of the Week Andy Rowe with his fiance, Eden Birnaum.(Photo: Courtesy of Andy Rowe)

A) In 2013 I took the love of my life, Eden, on our first date for tacos at Taqueria Mixteca, then we checked out the planetarium at Boonshoft, and finally we had coffee at Ghostlight. Actually she drove so I guess she took me? Either way she was putty in my hands after that day. 

 >> ON THE MENU: A burrito to end all burritos at Taqueria Mixteca

>> Dayton museum director stepping down 

Q) What makes the Oregon District a unique place? 

 

 A) Its history is pretty amazing. A lot of the buildings are quite old with more than a couple having been built in the late 19th century. Fifth Street was primarily a rail hub adjacent to the canal, and you can still see clues in areas around Fifth Street of the tracks that ran under where there's now roadway. I don't think it's coincidence that a few local business names allude to trains and trolleys either (Oregon Express, Trolley Stop). Presumably the railroad connected to tracks that would bring you out to the state of Oregon. The story of the neighborhood pulling together decades later to restore and preserve the district is inspiring. I was raised in East Dayton and got to see a bit of the tail end of the neighborhood's resurgence. I have fond memories from my youth visiting my uncle Butch, who tended bar at the American Saloon which operated where Lucky's Taproom is now. Butch lived above the saloon and had a huge pot-bellied pig. Also noteworthy when it comes to the pronunciation of Oregon is here many usually pronounce it ore-uh-GONE, while folks in the state of Oregon I'm told cringe unless you pronounce it more like AURA-gun. 

>> What are the oldest bars in downtown Dayton?

Q) What should people know about Daytonians? 

 

Daytonian of the Week Andy Rowe with his fiance, Eden Birnaum.(Photo: Courtesy of Andy Rowe)

A) Daytonians really are inventive. People know we invented airplanes (even if Kittyhawk has yet to get memo), but few realize how prolific Dayton is when it comes to the density of patents and the creation of new intellectual property. Search engines, pop- top cans, cash registers, digital scales, ice cube trays, chrome plating, artificial hearts and kidneys, microfiche, black lights, and that's just the tip of the iceberg. Describing the music that comes from Dayton as inventive too would be pretty accurate. 

 

Q) What inspires you about Dayton? 

Daytonian of the Week Andy Rowe.(Photo: Courtesy of Andy Rowe)

 

A) People from Dayton are determined. Dayton's teachers, artists and business owners are all stubborn and in the best way. It's evident in the people who never give up in the face of the continuous challenges the city seems to be constantly presented with, and that stubbornness is a sign of our strength. 

 >> Daytonians you are going to want to know 

Q) What do you think Dayton will look like in 10-15 years? 

 

A) I am optimistic Dayton will grow, continuing to invent and reinvent itself. It is my hope that city leaders will take a proactive approach to embracing the future. Increasing access to information by making a real commitment to bringing broadband access to the entire city would say to the world that Dayton really is a tech town. Embracing and exploring technology like Bitcoin Cash would put the city at the front of what's being made possible via open-source, programmable money. Lastly, and perhaps most important, a renewed and serious commitment to the education of Dayton's youth is needed. Teaching every student about our local history and being honest about the effects that the 1913 flood and desegregation had on Dayton and the surrounding communities is an important tool needed to help people understand and truly begin to undo the city's legacy of racial tension, which we all should agree belongs exclusively in our past. 

>>  Currency of the future? Some argue it’s bitcoin

Daytonian of the Week Andy Rowe.(Photo: Courtesy of Andy Rowe)

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The top Daytonians of 2017 

Published: Monday, January 01, 2018 @ 6:00 AM

Here are the Top 10 Daytonians of 2017. Video by Amelia Robinson.

A city is only as good as the people who call it home. 

The Dayton area is teeming with incredible people. We are fortunate to have featured 52 of them in 2017 as part of our ongoing Daytonian of the Week feature. 

There were artists, restaurateurs, an Emmy-winner,  entrepreneurs, activists and four women calling their own shots in downtown Dayton.

>> RELATED: TOP DAYTONIANS OF THE WEEK FOR 2016

Here are the top 10 most-read Daytonian of the Week stories for 2018 in reverse order.

10)  ERIC JERARDI

Blues guitarist, founder of the Eric Jerardi Band, wine expert and owner  of Jerardi’s Little Store at 7325 Peters Pike in Butler Twp.

Daytonian of the Week Eric Jerardi is musician, deli owner and wine expert. CONTRIBUTED(Staff Writer)

“People don’t realize how great they have it here in Dayton. You have to travel a lot to understand that. I live north and really love it here — no traffic issues, and I love the airport being so close. We are picking up direct flights all the time, and that’s nice for weekend getaways.”

>> RELATED: WHY ERIC JERARDI LOVES DAYTON 

9) EMMY FABICH AND KATIE NORRIS 

Downtown residents and outdoor advcocates. Emmy works for Bike Miami Valley, the region's only bicycling advocacy organization and Katie runs the program education for Link: Dayton Bike Share. Katie works for the City in the Department of Water, Division of Environmental Management.

>> MORE: The 5 best Miami Valley bike trails (and how to make the most of them) 

Daytonians of the Week: Emmy Fabich and Katie Norris(Photos: submitted)

Emmy: “People should know that Dayton is so lucky to have so many places to get outside, get active, explore and have local adventures right here. You don't need to spend tons of money or move to Denver: you could do a local bike touring trip on the nation's largest paved trail network, go whitewater kayaking on our national water trail system, or rent a bike at MetroParks Mountain Bike Area (MoMBA) and ride in the woods, or do a weekend backpacking trip on the Twin Valley Trail. The opportunities are endless! Dayton's got it going on. And I just love seeing the reaction on people's faces when you tell them all of the things that they can experience here.”

 

Katie: “Don't assume the perception you have of Dayton from five years ago holds true today. If you think there isn't something fun to do in Dayton for any age, on any day, then you're not looking hard enough. Also, Dayton isn't perfect, but if you see a challenge, ask yourself how can you work together with others to start addressing that challenge. We all have to take pride in where we live or work, and actively work to make it even better.”

>> RELATED: WHY EMMY FABICH AND KATIE NORRIS LOVE DAYTON 


8) TERRY ADKINS  & SUSAN AND JOE BAVARO  

The trio own the Oregon Express Bar & Restaurant in Dayton’s Oregon Historic District. 

Terry Adkins (left), Susan and Joe Bavaro, owners of the Oregon Express Bar & Restaurant in Dayton’s Oregon Historic District. SUBMITTED(Staff Writer)

Terry: “The Oregon District has always been a popular and successful business and entertainment destination and neighborhood of Dayton for the last 30 years. The recent explosion of additional interest and investment in the district and the whole downtown Dayton area bodes well. It all points to a future center city of multiple choices of where to live, work and play in a dynamic urban center for the Miami Valley region.”

>> RELATED: WHY TERRY ADKINS  & SUSAN AND JOE BAVARO LOVE DAYTON 

>>  Your guide to the best Dayton-area pizza

7) DAVID SUTER 

Force behind the Instagram accounts @IGersDayton and @entropic.

David Suter, the eye behind the Instagram accounts @IgersDayton and @entropic, thrives on showing the beauty in the darker views of Dayton and its residents. (contributed)

“Dayton has faced a lot of challenges as a community but what inspires me is the sheer number of individuals committed to making it better. Everywhere you look are small business owners working hard to get by because they are passionate about our city. It's that dedication and loyalty that continuously amazes me.”

>> RELATED: WHY  DAVID SUTER LOVES DAYTON 

6) BRYAN STEWART 

Legislative aide to Dayton City Commissioner Christopher Shaw and founder of The Longest Table Dayton.

City of Dayton Legislative Aide Bryan Stewart founded The Longest Table Dayton, an UpDayton project. He is a Daytonian of the Week. Photo: submitted(Submitted)

“Faux, forced, urban environments are being rejected by millennials. We’re moving downtown, we’re moving closer to cool amenities we can walk or ride a bike to and there’s huge potential in this trend. ‘Outsiders’ should start more businesses and offices in this space because it’s only going to grow.”

>> RELATED: WHY BRYAN STEWART LOVES DAYTON 

5) THE DOWNTOWN BROWNS 

Lisa Scott of Beaute Box Lashes Dayton; Kate Rivers of Twist Cupcakery; Juanita Darden-Jones of Third Perk Coffeehouse and Wine Bar and Jasmine Brown of De’Lish Cafe.

The Downtown Browns are made up of Lisa Scott of Beaute Box Lashes Dayton; Jasmine Brown of De’Lish Cafe, Kate Rivers of Twist Cupcakery and Juanita Darden-Jones of Third Perk Coffeehouse & Wine Bar.

Jasmine: “We really are showing our people the importance of supporting each other... We are black women and we are working together.”

>> RELATED: WHY THE DOWNTOWN BROWNS LOVE DAYTON 

4) MICHAEL SHUBERT

Owner of the Red Carpet Tavern

Michael Shubert, owner of the Red Carpet Tavern in Dayton. PHOTO BY JIM INGRAM/STAFF

“I got me a big boy job when I was about 20 years old and stayed here. I did the family thing. I moved away briefly to Daytona. (I) came back. I like it here in Dayton. I like the Belmont area. I like to bring our neighborhoods back.”

>> RELATED:  WHY MICHAEL SHUBERT LOVES DAYTON 

3) BILL CASTRO 

Equestrian and co-owner of El Meson, 903 E Dixie Dr., West Carollton 

Bill Castro with one of his show horses. File photo by LISA POWELL/STAFF(Staff Writer)

(Dayton) is small enough to get around and yet unique in the gem of restaurants we have.

>> RELATED: WHY BILL CASTRO LOVES DAYTON 

2) ROB STRONG 

Owner of Thai 9, 11 Brown St., and Canal Street Arcade & Deli, 308 E 1st St.

Rob Strong stands in the future Canal Street Arcade & Deli in November 2016, shortly after renovations to the interior began. The arcade-deli-craft beer bar could open as early as late April. MARK FISHER/STAFF(Staff Writer)

What inspires me about Dayton: “The many entrepreneurs I personally know in Dayton and its history of innovators with the visions and the willingness to see those visions through.”

>> RELATED: WHY ROB STRONG LOVES DAYTON 

1) ALLISON JANNEY 

Award-winning film and television actress and current star of “CBS’ “Mom” 

The former star of “The West Wing” has a long list of film credits  that includes roles in “The Help,” “Drop Dead Gorgeous,” “Hairspray,” “American Beauty,” “The Girl on the Train,” “The Hours,” “Finding Nemo,” “Big Night” and “Juno.” 

>> RELATED: Famous Dayton actress reacts to big Golden Globe nomination for role in Tonya Harding film 

The 2017 Dayton Region's Walk of Fame induction ceremony at Sinclair Community College on Thursday, Sept. 28th, included a few stars. Pictured here is 2017 inductee and seven-time Emmy winner Allison Janney taking photos with attendees. AMELIA ROBINSON/STAFF(HANDOUT)

“We are salt of the Earth. We are the people who are grounded and know what’s important about life and know that treating people with respect and kindness (is important).... I’ve always felt that the people I’ve met from Dayton are great people.”

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Daytonian of the Week: Etana Jacobi 

Published: Wednesday, January 03, 2018 @ 6:00 AM

Etana Jacobi  of Dayton
Photos: submitted
Etana Jacobi  of Dayton(Photos: submitted)

It is not how long you live in a place that counts, but the impact you make while there. 

Etana Jacobi is certainly making her mark on the Gem City. 

The Hooksett, N.H. native is the Dayton manager of the Hall of Hunger Initiative, an effort supported by the United Way of the Greater Dayton Area and the Jack W. and Sally D. Eichelberger Foundation, aimed at reducing food insecurity and increasing food access.

The resident of Dayton’s South Park neighborhood is our latest Daytonian of the Week. 

>> MORE: Guardian angels ‘adopt’ 400 local kids for Christmas

What is your passion and why? 

PEOPLE. I'm passionate about a lot of political issues, but really at the core of what I care about most in this world is how the decisions we make individually and collectively affect those around us. Humans are complex, imperfect, funny and strange strange creatures, and I am consistently amazed and challenged by what we're capable of -- both the good and the not-so-good. I figure you come into this life alone and you leave it alone, so why not invest your time on this planet with and for others? 

>> MORE: These 3 winning UpDayton ideas want to change Dayton for the better 

What do you love about life in Dayton? 

I love that this city is filled with folks who are passionate about their home and committed to making it better. I also love that you can have the benefits of life in the city with the feel of a small town. Not only is there always something to do, but there is a good chance you are going to run into someone you know while doing it. Also, the donuts. 

>> MORE: You have to try these Dayton donuts 

Etana Jacobi  of Dayton(Photos: submitted)

Why did you decide to move here? 

I moved here in the fall of 2015 for a job at the Kettering Foundation with no intention of staying very long. I have spent the majority of my adult life bouncing between major cities on the east coast and a small city in the Midwest where I knew no one was not the most appealing. Fortunately, I found a community of people here who are kind, committed and willing to share their home with me. I'm deeply grateful for the opportunity to be a Daytonian and excited to put some roots down here. 

What would you do on a perfect date in Dayton? 

There are so many things going on in Dayton, I feel like there is no one perfect date. Perfect date options might include going to a festival in the summer or fall, walking downtown for a movie at the Neon followed by dinner at one of the many awesome locally-owned restaurants, a picnic and hike in one of our fabulous Five Rivers MetroParks, biking on our great bike trails, taste testing delicious donuts at all of the local spots on my personal quest to find the best donut in the region. The possibilities are endless.

>> MORE: The Neon’s Jonathan McNeal shares his can’t miss movies of 2017  

Q) What would you change about Dayton? 

Dayton is a small city with big city problems. It is also a place filled with tremendous assets, a rich and complicated history, and infinite opportunities for growth. I believe in our capacity to build a stronger city for ALL Daytonians, and I think we can only do it with an intentional community-wide focus on issues of equity and justice in our own backyard. 

What should people know about Dayton? 

Hunger is real in Dayton. Almost a third of households with children struggle with food hardship in our community. Most of the west side has been classified as a food desert by the USDA. Thirty-eight percent of clients served by The Foodbank report having to choose between paying for food and paying for utilities/heating fuel. It is simply unacceptable. We cannot have a healthy and vibrant community if our neighbors cannot afford to eat. 

>> RELATED: Meet the top Daytonians of 2017 

What is your hidden talent? 

If I have a hidden talent, it is hidden even to me.

What do you think Dayton will look like in 10-15 years? 

In 10 to 15 years, I see a strong food ecosystem in Dayton, generating an abundance of healthy, affordable and culturally appropriate food, grown and sold locally with care for the well-being of the workers, animals and environment that sustain it. 

I see worker and community-owned businesses, like the Gem City Market, thriving throughout the city. I see every child attending quality Pre-K programs and our students hitting their third-grade reading and eighth-grade math targets. I see young families living throughout the city and sending their children to Dayton Public Schools with pride. I see a vibrant downtown on the nights and weekends with locally-owned businesses filling up our store fronts. I see the Hope Center serving as an anchor institution in NorthWest Dayton, disrupting cycles of poverty and empowering families.

>> RELATED: Dayton co-op grocery store gets $220,000 donation

Etana Jacobi  of Dayton(Photos: submitted)

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