WHIO-TV’s Otte inducted into Broadcasters Hall of Fame tonight

Published: Wednesday, March 15, 2017 @ 12:33 PM
Updated: Thursday, September 21, 2017 @ 2:18 AM

WHIO-TV reporter Jim Otte interviews Kevin Burch, president of Jet Express in Dayton and the American Trucking Association. Otte will be inducted into the Dayton Area Broadcasters Hall of Fame in September. CONTRIBUTED
WHIO-TV reporter Jim Otte interviews Kevin Burch, president of Jet Express in Dayton and the American Trucking Association. Otte will be inducted into the Dayton Area Broadcasters Hall of Fame in September. CONTRIBUTED

UPDATE @ 9:40 p.m.

WHIO-TV reporter Jim Otte, who also is the host of “WHIO Reports,” was unducted tonight into the Dayton Area Broadcasters Hall of Fame.

Jim Otte, WHIO-TV reporter was inducted Sept. 21, 2017, into the Dayton Area Broadcasters Hall of Fame

EARLIER REPORT

WHIO-TV reporter Jim Otte and the host of WHIO Reports is among those slated this year to be inducted into the Dayton Area Broadcasters Hall of Fame.

The hall announced in March its 2017 slate of inductees. This year, six broadcasters will be inducted along with four broadcasting “pioneers” and a Community Service Award honoree.

SOCIAL MEDIAFollow Jim Otte on Facebook. 

The 10 inductees will be honored at a ceremony at the Marriott at the University of Dayton tonight.

These honorees are:

Christopher Geisen: A popular co-host of the No. 1 rated “Kerrigan & Christopher Morning Show” on WTUE ratio from (1988 to 1999). First introduced to broadcasting in 1973 in Erlanger, Ky., he has continues working in radio, as well as volunteering to charity events including: Big Brothers/Big Sisters, breast cancer awareness, the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society and animal well-being shelters, the organization said in its announcement.

Joe Smith: Smith is the long-time host of “Clubhouse 22” on WKEF-TV from 1970-1979 and vice president of production from 1980 to 1986. Smith is working today on-air in Portland, Ore., the hall said.

John King: With 30 years of radio broadcasting experience, King served as regional president, senior vice president, general manager, operational manager, program director and on-air talent at stations in Dayton and around the country. Today, he is the senior vice president/market manager at Alpha Media USA in Dayton.

Natasha Williams: Presently, anchor and reporter at WKEF Television, Natasha has a history in the broadcasting industry dating back to 1990 in Jackson, Tenn. where she began her career.

“Along with her extensive career in broadcasting, her commitment to the community is equally as dedicated,” the hall said. “Williams enjoys mentoring aspiring journalists, as well as volunteering countless hours annually to lend her voice to local not-for-profit organizations.”

Jeff Stevens: Today, he is senior vice president of programming for iHeartMedia/Dayton, program director at WMMX and morning show co-host of the “Jeff, Gina and Dave Show.” He is also the host of the Time Warp Cafe weekdays at noon and host of the 80’s Show, which is broadcast on over 40 iHeartRadio stations across the country.

James (Jim) Otte: Otte is the reporter and producer of the WHIO I-Team at WHIO-TV and the host of “WHIO Reports,” a weekly public affairs program. His tenure with the station dates back to 1988. He began his broadcasting career on Ohio Public Radio in 1982.

“Jim is known for his investigative work covering the Ohio Statehouse, government and politics,” the hall said. “At WHIO-TV, he began the ‘Wastebusters’ segment covering government waste, fraud and abuse of taxpayers’ dollars in Dayton.”

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And those named “pioneers” include:

Dick Bieser: He began his broadcasting career in 1952, in his hometown of Centralia, IL. He rose to the position of news director and managed the station for nearly two years before getting back into news.

He joined the WHIO-TV news department as daytime assignment editor before he became news director. He worked as a contributing reporter on-air and anchored the newscasts Saturday evenings. Dick worked at WHIO-TV from 1965 to 1993.

Ed Hamlyn: Hamlyn was the former news director at WDTN Television. He was born in Hamilton in 1917. He began his broadcasting career with stops in Connecticut, Pennsylvania and Texas, before landing in Dayton.

“He knew the importance of giving back to community and served on numerous boards and community committees including: the Montgomery County Historical Society, Aviation Trail board and The League of Woman Voters,” the hall said.

Joe Rockhold: Rockhold hosted one of the first live entertainment television shows in the Dayton area on WHIO-TV. He created the popular character “Uncle Orrie,” entertaining thousands of Miami Valley young people. In addition to his work as “Uncle Orrie,” Joe Rockhold hosted various public affairs programs on WHIO.

Jack Jacobson: Jacobson created many popular characters, including “Nosey the Clown.” Both Jacobson and Rockhold made television history at a time in the early 1950s when television was just coming of age.

Every two years, the hall names someone who “has been a friend of the media, as well as a dedicated and innovative leader in the community.”

This year’s Community Service Award will be given to Judge Alice O. McCollum.

Judge McCollum is the first woman to serve on the Montgomery County Court of Common Pleas Probate Division, having been first elected in 2002 and re-elected in 2008. Prior to sitting on the bench in the Probate Division, she was the first and only woman elected to the Dayton Municipal Court bench.

McCollum served the Dayton Municipal Court for 24 years and has served on many community boards.

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Moldy comforter among latest product recalls

Published: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 12:32 PM

Moldy comforter among latest product recalls

The latest product recalls include a potentially moldy comforter, an unstable bassinette, and snow globes that could potentially cause a fire, according to the Consumer Product Safety Commission. 

 

The Hudson comforters by UGG under recall were sold at Bed Bath & Beyond and may contain mold which could pose a risk of infection or respiratory issues in people with a mold allergy or compromised immune system. 

The comforters come in four colors: garnet, navy, grey and oatmeal. They were sold between August 2017 and October 2017. 

No injuries have been reported. 

If you have one don't use it and return it to the store for a full refund. Call Bed Bath & Beyond at 800-462-3966 for more information. 

 

The latest product recalls include a potentially moldy comforter, an unstable bassinette, and snow globes that could potentially cause a fire, according to the Consumer Product Safety Commission.

The Multipro Baby Cradle N Swing bassinet sold on Amazon.com poses a fall and entrapment hazard for babies. 

The Consumer Product Safety Commission reports the bassinets fail to meet mandatory federal safety standards. 

It is recommended that you take the bassinet apart and throw it away. No injuries have been reported. 

Amazon has contacted purchasers and issued full refund gift cards. 

If you have one of these products and did not yet receive a refund contact Amazon at 888-280-4331. 

 

The latest product recalls include a potentially moldy comforter, an unstable bassinette, and snow globes that could potentially cause a fire, according to the Consumer Product Safety Commission.

Two Coldwater Creek snow globe models pose a fire hazard. 

The Consumer Product Safety Commission reports light refraction through the globes may melt or singe things placed near them. 

Once incident of damage has been reported. 

The Reindeer snow globe has the model number XC7484. 

The Vintage charm snow globe contains a silver snowman and has the model number 3WGL120. 

They were sold in Coldwater Creek stores and online. 

Stop using the snow globes and contact Coldwater Creek at 888-678 5576 to return the product for a full refund. 

 

The latest product recalls include a potentially moldy comforter, an unstable bassinette, and snow globes that could potentially cause a fire, according to the Consumer Product Safety Commission.

Fujifilm is recalling some digital camera power adapters because they could shock you. 

The adapter plug can break or crack exposing live electrical contacts, according to the Consumer Product Safety Commission. 

The AC-5VF power adaptors were sold with six Fujifilm digital camera models in stores and online. 

Don't use the adapter and contact Fujifilm at 833-613-1200 for a free replacement. 

No injuries have been reported. 

Spectrum reports TV streaming app service issues

Published: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 3:54 PM

FILE
FILE

Spectrum customers are reporting service interruptions while attempting to use the Spectrum TV app, the company said on Friday afternoon.

“Spectrum customers are experiencing a service interruption while attempting to use the Spectrum TV App. This is causing errors including incorrect login information. Technicians are working diligently to restore the service as soon as possible. We apologize for the inconvenience,” the company said on social media.

The issue was first reported by the company around 1 p.m. on Friday.

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Spectrum TV Stream customers can watch select TV content through the Spectrum TV app using Roku, Xbox One, Samsung Smart TV or other compatible mobile device. Spectrum TV Stream customers can also view programming on SpectrumTV.com.

This news organization has reached out to Spectrum to see if any credits will be offered to impacted customers.

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Chamber welcomes new board members

Published: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 3:51 PM

THOMAS GNAU/STAFF
THOMAS GNAU/STAFF

The Dayton Area Chamber of Commerce is welcoming new board of trustees members while thanking retiring members.

The new chamber board members are:

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Doug Anspach, Leadership Dayton chair and partner in Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP; Doug Barry, president of BarryStaff Inc.; Randy Domigan, director of Brady Ware; Cindy Gaboury, owner of Audio Etc.; Andy Horner, vice president, University of Dayton; Tami Kirby, of Porter, Wright, Morris & Arthur; Dan McCabe, chair, EPI Foundation; Mary Mierzejewski, chair, Generation Dayton; Anne Marie Singleton, consultant and shareholder, McGohan Brabender; and Steve Tieber, owner of the Dublin Pub

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The retiring board members are: Jerad Barnett, of Mills Morgan Development; Niki Chaudhry, Eric Joo, of Schueler Group; Brady Kress, president and CEO of Dayton History; John McCance, McCance Consulting Group, LLC.

The board consists of up to 50 local business leaders who carry out the business of the chamber according to its bylaws. The board meets quarterly in February, May, August and November. Members may serve up to three, two-year terms.

The chamber has about 2,700 members in nine counties around Dayton.

Amazon raises monthly Prime membership rate

Published: Friday, January 19, 2018 @ 3:09 PM

Amazon Announces Cities Still In Consideration For Second Headquarters

The monthly membership fee for Amazon Prime rose Friday from $10.99 to $12.99.

Company officials said the annual membership will remain at $99 dollars.

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Monthly customers do not get access to Amazon Video, which costs $8.99 a month.

The last Prime subscription hike came in 2014, when Amazon increased its yearly membership from $79 to $99.

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The e-commerce company did not give a reason for the price increase.