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STORE CLOSINGS: Gander Mountain files for bankruptcy

Published: Monday, March 13, 2017 @ 1:20 PM

Find out what stores are closing down.

Sporting goods retailer Gander Mountain Company, which has a location in Huber Heights, has filed for bankruptcy.

The outdoor sporting goods retailer, which sells guns and rifles, operates 162 and announced that 32 “underperforming” stores will shut down in the next several weeks. No Ohio stores were on that list of impacted stores.

» RELATED: 9 retailers closing stores nationwide this year

Gander Mountain and some of its subsidiaries filed voluntary petitions for relief under Chapter 11 of the United States Bankruptcy Code earlier this month after the retailer “experienced traffic patterns and shifts in consumer demand resulting from increased direct-to-customer sales by key vendors and accelerated growth of e-commerce,” according to a company statement.

The chain has a store located at 8001 Old Troy Pike in Huber Heights, but store workers said the location was not in the process of closing.

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Gander Mountain is in active discussions with a number of parties interested in a going-concern sale and expects to solicit bids prior to an auction to be held in late April 2017, according to the company. The company expects to submit the winning bid to the court for approval in early May and anticipates a closing of the sale by May 15.

Gander Mountain has stores in 26 states, including eight in Ohio.

CONTRIBUTED(Staff Writer)

Stores slated for closing:

Alabama (4) – Gadsden, Mobile, Montgomery, Tuscaloosa

Georgia (3) – Augusta, McDonough, Snellville

Illinois (3) – Champaign, Algonquin, Springfield

Indiana (2) – Merrillville, Greenfield

Minnesota (3) – Rogers, Mankato, Woodbury

New York (1) – New Hartford

North Carolina (2) – Raleigh, South Charlotte

Tennessee (1) – Chattanooga

Texas (10) – Houston, Killeen, Laredo, Lubbock, Round Rock, San Antonio, Sugar Land, Texarkana, Waco, West Houston

West Virginia (1) – Charleston

Wisconsin (2) – Eau Claire, Germantown

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Target will offer SAME-DAY delivery after acquiring Shipt Inc.

Published: Wednesday, December 13, 2017 @ 11:31 AM

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Target Corp. announced it will acquire Shipt Inc., an online same-day delivery platform — and that means getting your Target purchases delivered to your door even faster.

Target acquired Shipt for $550 million, and it will enable Target to offer same-day delivery services at approximately half of its stores by early 2018.

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“The acquisition significantly accelerates Target’s digital fulfillment efforts, bringing same-day delivery services to guests at approximately half of Target stores by early 2018. The service will be offered from the majority of Target stores, and in all major markets, before the 2018 holiday season,” the company announced.

Target will initially offer same-day delivery of groceries, essentials, electronics and other products. By the end of 2019, same-day delivery will include all major products at Target.

“By the 2018 holiday season, we will be servicing every major market across the country with same-day delivery, and Shipt’s service-oriented approach aligns well with Target’s commitment to delivering an exceptional shopping experience for our guests,” said John Mulligan, executive vice president and chief operating officer for Target.

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Shipt is a rapidly growing membership-based grocery marketplace and same-day delivery platform. It is currently utilized by Meijer in the Southwest Ohio region. Through Shipt’s app, members are connected to local, reliable shoppers who help facilitate a quality delivery experience that is personalized, efficient and convenient.

Shipt will be a wholly owned Target subsidiary, and will continue to run its business independently.

The transaction is subject to customary closing conditions and is expected to close prior to the end of calendar year 2017. This all-cash acquisition will be immaterial to Target’s near-term financial results.

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5 fast facts that will help make filling out FAFSA a breeze

Published: Wednesday, December 13, 2017 @ 10:32 AM

Student Given $1M In Financial Aid by Mistake

It's that time of year again when parents and college or college-bound students fill out the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid).

The idea of wading through a form – especially one that requires financial information – is definitely not an appealing idea, but the FAFSA could be a tremendous help in getting your student money to attend college.

RELATED: 20 financial aid terms every college student and parent should understand

The following points are what you need to know, as well as common mistakes to avoid when filling out the FAFSA.

Fill it out – you have nothing to lose.

You may think that you don't need to fill out the FAFSA, especially if you believe you might not qualify for need-based aid. But there's no income cut-off point with federal student aid, according to the U.S. Department of Education. In addition, the FAFSA can help you qualify for all kinds of grants, loans and scholarships, including those offered by your state, school or private organizations.

By investing a few minutes of time, you could reap thousands of dollars in potential rewards.

Submit it ASAP.

The sooner you submit your FAFSA, the better, according to consumer adviser Clark Howard. Although the federal deadline isn't until June 30, 2018, you should check with the financial aid administrator at colleges you're interested in to make sure their deadlines aren't earlier.

Submitting earlier will help you plan how you'll pay for college. You'll also have a better chance of getting as much aid or scholarship money as possible since some colleges distribute their available money on a first-come, first-serve basis, Howard says.

Gather the information you'll need.

The FAFSA asks questions about the student as well as his or her parents if the student is a dependent.

You'll need the following information on hand as you fill out the FAFSA:

  • The student's Social Security number
  • The parents' Social Security numbers
  • Driver's license number (if you have one)
  • Alien registration number (if you're not a U.S. citizen)
  • Federal tax information for the student (and his or her spouse, if applicable) and the parents. This can often be imported online, so you may not need your records.
  • Information on the student's and parents' assets, such as money held in bank accounts and real estate holdings (not your primary residence)
  • Records of the student's or parents' untaxed income, such as veterans benefits and interest income

Watch out for common mistakes.

The National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators points out some common mistakes that can delay your form's submission or cause you to not get the aid and scholarships you might qualify for. They include the following:

  • Leaving some fields blank – Instead, put in a "0" or "not applicable."
  • Listing an incorrect Social Security or driver's license number – It pays to recheck these numbers.
  • Failing to use your legal name – Use the name on your Social Security card, not a nickname.
  • Forgetting to list colleges – Even if you're not sure of which college you'll be attending, add any reasonable possibilities to the list of colleges that will receive your information. You're under no obligation to apply to or attend these colleges, and they can't see which other colleges you're interested in.

Keep an eye out for requests for more information.

Your FAFSA may be selected for verification, which means you'll have to provide some additional or supporting information, U.S. News & World Report explains. This process doesn't necessarily mean you've done anything wrong. You may have a discrepancy or mistake on your form, but some FAFSAs are just randomly selected for verification (lucky you!).

These requests will often come to the student's personal email account or university email address, so he or she will have to be diligent about checking it and responding to any requests by the stated deadline.

Related

Companies drop liquor at holiday parties amid sexual harassment saga, study says

Published: Wednesday, December 13, 2017 @ 9:44 AM

What to Do If You're Sexually Harassed at Work

As sexual harassment scandals remain at the forefront of the nation's collective conscious, many companies across the United States aim to cut down on any possibility of such occurrences at holiday parties by removing alcohol from the festivities.

RELATED: Sexual harassment in the workplace: What is it, how to report it and more you should know

Challenger, Gray & Christmas, a Chicago-based consulting firm, conducts an annual survey of American companies and their holiday party plans for employees. This year, the survey noted a dramatic 13 percent drop in companies planning to serve alcohol during their holiday festivities.

Just under 49 percent of the 150 companies included in the survey plan on serving alcohol this year, compared to 62 percent in 2016. Last year's percentage was the highest since the consulting firm began the survey a decade ago, while this year's survey is the first to record a dip in companies planning to serve alcohol.

"Employers are currently very wary of creating an environment where inappropriate contact between employees could occur," Andrew Challenger, vice president of the firm, said in a statement included with the findings.

"One way to create a safer environment is to limit the guest list, hold the party during the workday, and avoid serving alcohol," he added.

Challenger believes that companies have taken notice of the news reports regarding sexual harassment.

With high-profile sexual harassment allegations making headlines, from Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein, to Alabama judge and politician Roy Moore, to actor Kevin Spacey and President Donald Trump, among a long list others, workplace sexual harassment has also been thrown into the spotlight.

RELATED: From Weinstein to Lauer: A timeline of 2017's sexual harassment scandals

In a 2015 survey of 2,235 full-time and part-time female employees, Cosmopolitan found that one in three women experienced sexual harassment at work during their lives. While many remain silent about harassment, fearing repercussions, recent media attention and high-profile cases have emboldened many women – and some men – to come forward with their own stories.

As a result, companies across the nation are taking extra precautions in the workplace and during their seasonal gatherings.

"[The company party] should boost morale and let workers know they are valued. It should not put anyone in an uncomfortable situation," Challenger said, explaining that human resources departments definitely don't want the holiday season to be "marred by a disturbing workplace party experience."

Although recent allegations of sexual harassment may increase companies' concerns, steps to avoid uncomfortable and inappropriate situations have been encouraged for years. For instance, the National Federation of Independent Businesses has recommended for several years that companies stop hanging mistletoe at holiday parties, according to TIME.

Some companies have decided against having open bars, offering limited drink tickets to employees instead. Many also specifically ask bar tenders, security guards or designated employees to keep an eye on how much individuals are drinking and monitor their behavior towards others.

While these steps help create a safer environment, employees should also be more aware and monitor their own behavior as well. A recent study conducted by Data marketer Brionna Lewis with auto company Instamotor found that many men aren't really clear on what constitutes sexual harassment.

One in three respondents said they don't think catcalling is sexual harassment, and two in three respondents said they don't think repeated unwanted invitations to dinner, drinks or dates is sexual harassment. At the same time, 45 percent of the men said they've witnessed someone being sexually harassed, with 50 percent of respondents reporting such incidents occurred at work or at a party/bar/nightclub.

RELATED: Woman says she lost work hours after reporting sexual harassment

If you're unclear on what sexual harassment is and/or are wondering how to get help in case you've been harassed, here's a breakdown:

  • The US labor department defines two types of sexual harassment: 1) if an employment decision (such as promotion, assignment or keeping your job) is made based on submission to the sexual harassment, and 2) sexual harassment makes workplace hostile, intimidating, abusive or offensive.
  • Harassment can include (but is not limited to): unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, other verbal or physical harassment of a sexual nature and non-sexual but offensive remarks about a person's sex.
  • Harassment is illegal when: conduct is unwelcome, conduct is based on the victim's protected gender or sexual orientation status, subjectively abusive to an affected person, or severe and pervasive enough to create a work environment that a reasonable person would find hostile.
  • The gender or position of the individual doesn't matter. A harasser can be a man or a woman as well as a CEO, manager, co-worker, client or customer.
  • According to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, the law doesn't prohibit simple teasing, offhand comments or isolated incidents that are "not very serious."
  • But when teasing becomes frequent and severe, creates an adverse or hostile work environment, or results in an adverse employment decision, it then becomes illegal.
  • If you are sexually harassed you should immediately tell the individual the attention is not welcome. You should then inform your manager, employer or HR manager of the situation.
  • For those who find speaking out too difficult, individuals can call the National Sexual Assault Hotline at 1-800-656-HOPE (4673), which includes free services and confidential support.

Related

Dayton developer names new CEO, announces business spin-off

Published: Wednesday, December 13, 2017 @ 8:34 AM
Updated: Wednesday, December 13, 2017 @ 1:36 PM


            Elizabeth Mangan
Elizabeth Mangan

Dayton developer Miller Valentine has announced a new chief executive, the spin-off of its commercial asset and property management businesses and other leadership changes.

Elizabeth Mangan will be the real estate company’s CEO effective Jan. 1.

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Mangan graduated cum laude from West Virginia University and earned a law degree from Georgetown University Law Center. She joined Miller-Valentine in 2008, was named general counsel in 2011 and became a partner in 2014, the firm said in its announcement.

After becoming a member of the company’s executive committee, Mangen was chosen to lead the strategic planning initiative for the company.

“For the past two years, she has been instrumental in defining the path forward for Miller-Valentine,” the firm said in its statement. “Mangan is committed to giving back to the community and currently serves as a board member of Adopt-A-Class, the Good Samaritan Hospital Foundation, and The Aruna Project.”

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Also, the company said senior partners Bill Krul and Mike Green will become co-executive chairmen of Miller Valentine’s board of directors.

“They will oversee the transition of leadership and ownership, the fourth of its kind since the company was formed in 1963,” the firm said. “Miller-Valentine’s commercial asset and property management businesses will be spun off to a newly formed entity, Culmen Real Estate Services.”

Culmen will be led by senior partner Ed Blake, who will be departing Miller-Valentine.

These business units are two of the spin-offs planned by Miller-Valentine as the company focuses on what it calls its “core businesses.”

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“Miller-Valentine Group continues to evolve and these changes in leadership and strategy position the company for future growth and success,” the company’s statement said.