Real estate firms merge to form Coldwell Banker Lingle

Published: Thursday, November 02, 2017 @ 10:19 PM

Managing Partner Ron Sweeney stands outside Coldwell Banker Heritage's new office on Yankee Street in September 2017. The firm has now merged with Richmond, Indiana-based Lingle Real Estate Inc. to become Coldwell Banker Lingle.
KAITLIN SCHROEDER / STAFF
Managing Partner Ron Sweeney stands outside Coldwell Banker Heritage's new office on Yankee Street in September 2017. The firm has now merged with Richmond, Indiana-based Lingle Real Estate Inc. to become Coldwell Banker Lingle.(KAITLIN SCHROEDER / STAFF)

Coldwell Banker Heritage based in Dayton merged with Lingle Real Estate Inc. in Richmond, Indiana.

The merger creates Coldwell Banker Lingle.

Paul Lingle, son of Bill Lingle, who started the company n 1959, will continue to manage the sales and operations of Coldwell Banker Lingle, according to a release sent Thursday night.

This is the 50th anniversary year for Coldwell Banker Heritage. 

Both real estate firms have been top in their market for decades.

Coldwell Banker Lingle will be supported by Coldwell Banker Heritage’s marketing and technology resources, and Coldwell Banker will gain a presence in Wayne County and eastern Indiana where Lingle Real Estate has long been the most trusted name, the release stated.

Far Hills Bob Evans property sold for $2.5M

Published: Friday, December 08, 2017 @ 4:59 PM
Updated: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 @ 4:23 PM

CONTRIBUTED
CONTRIBUTED

The sale of area and Ohio Bob Evans restaurant properties continues.

A New Albany outfit has purchased the property housing the Centerville-area Bob Evans restaurant for $2.5 million.

The 4,992-square-foot building and 1.25-acre site at 7115 Far Hills Ave. was sold to Timothy P. and Paula S. Heather, of New Albany, Ohio, according to Montgomery County property records.

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The new owners give the same address as the Bob Evans headquarters in New Albany.

The local franchise food site was built in 1986.

Bob Evans has been restructuring its business and selling its restaurants quickly. Back in May, a trio of Dayton-area Bob Evans restaurants sold for a total of $5.6 million.

At the time, Bob Evans Farms Inc. had divided its business by keeping its food production side and selling off its restaurant chain to private equity group Golden Gate Capital.

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Bob Evans Farms, Inc. said in January it intended to sell off its restaurants to focus on packaged foods.

Golden Gate Capital bought the restaurants for $565 million, and Bob Evans Farms bought Pineland Farms Potato Co. for $115 million.

Downtown Springfield historic site gets $2M for apartment renovations

Published: Tuesday, December 19, 2017 @ 11:24 AM


            The McAdams Building has been selected for the National Register of Historic Places. Bill Lackey/Staff
The McAdams Building has been selected for the National Register of Historic Places. Bill Lackey/Staff

A vacant building in downtown Springfield that was nearly torn down has received $2 million in state historic tax credits that will be used to renovate it for apartments.

The total cost to renovate the Edward Wren Co. Building, more recently known as the McAdams Building, will be more than $15.3 million, according to the Ohio Development Services Agency.

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The property at 31 E. High St was built in 1921 as a department store and bank in the heart of downtown Springfield, according to its tax credit application. It will be revitalized as 28 market-rate apartments with a ground floor restaurant space, the state agency says.

The project is one of 22 historic sites in 11 communities to share more than $28.3 million in Ohio Historic Preservation Tax Credits.

Annexation vote expected Tuesday on 200 acres in Warren County

Published: Monday, November 27, 2017 @ 12:19 PM


            Warren County commissioners are expected to vote on Tuesday on annexation by South Lebanon of more than 200 acres, including the former Peters Cartridge Factory.
Warren County commissioners are expected to vote on Tuesday on annexation by South Lebanon of more than 200 acres, including the former Peters Cartridge Factory.

The Warren County Board of Commissioners is expected to vote on Tuesday on the proposed annexation of more than 220 acres, including the former Peters Cartridge Factory, by the Village of South Lebanon.

The annexation would enable the developer Bloomfield/Schon to avoid property taxes on improvements made through the $25 million redevelopment project to the Kings Local Schools.

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The area to be annexed by South Lebanon covers more than 222.7 acres, running from the existing village limits south down the riverfront bike path to US 22 and Ohio 3 and up the hill from the Peters Cartridge redevelopment site to a 67-acre farm.

RELATED: What to know about Peters Cartridge Factory redevelopment

Plans for more than $34 million in construction along the Little Miami River, including a new $9.5 million bridge, hinge on approval of annexation of the 14-acre Peters Cartridge Factory property and the other land by South Lebanon.

Developer Bloomfield/Schon is planning to convert the historic complex, where ammunition was made for almost a century, into 128 loft apartments, office space and a restaurant.

The development site is along the east bank of the Little Miami River. It fronts on a stretch of the multi-use trail along the east bank of the river. It was the site of a U.S. EPA cleanup.

The commissioners are expected to consider the annexation at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday during their regular meeting at the county administration building, 406 Justice Dr. in Lebanon.

House hunters, here are 5 secrets to getting the best home loan

Published: Thursday, October 19, 2017 @ 5:01 PM

Getting a home mortgage loan is one of the most important financial commitments most people will ever make, since the terms of your loan can affect your finances in a big way for years to come.

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Start shopping for a loan before you actually begin looking at homes, since this lets you know where you stand and gives you greater negotiating power with sellers.

The following are five important things you should know before and during the home loan shopping process:

Know your credit score

Your credit score has a great effect on how easily you'll be able to get a home loan as well as on the interest rate you'll pay, according to Realtor.com. Your score takes into account your credit history, current debt and other factors. Lenders use it to determine your credit-worthiness.

Check your credit report before you start the process of applying for a home loan. This way, you can correct any errors – which do occur sometimes. If your score is particularly low, you may want to delay applying for a loan until you can improve it.

Research, and research some more.

Your Realtor may recommend a mortgage lender, and it doesn't hurt to use this as a starting point. However, if you fail to shop around, it could cost you a substantial amount of money over the years.

Consumer Reports recommends casting a wide net when you're shopping for a home loan. Try large national banks, regional banks, credit unions, online banks and mortgage brokers, but be sure to compare them within a few days of each other since rates can fluctuate.

Make sure you’re making an accurate comparison on loan quotes.

When you're getting quotes from several lenders, you'll need to make sure you're making an apples-to-apples comparison, according to CBS News. The loan terms should be the same, and so should the loan type (variable or fixed-rate, for example).

"Points" are also an important consideration. These upfront fees reduce the interest rate on your loan, and you should get each potential lender to give you a rate with and without points so you can make an accurate comparison.

Ever heard of PMI? You might need to get to know it.

If you're not making a down payment of at least 20 percent, your lender will usually require PMI, or private mortgage insurance. Although you're the one paying for the insurance, it doesn't protect your interests. Instead, it protects your lender in case you default on your loan.

Forbes recommends saving up for a 20 percent down payment if you can, since PMI adds to your monthly costs. 

Prepare yourself for closing costs.

Be aware of the closing costs you'll pay as part of your loan, Investopedia recommends. You'll be stuck with some of them, but others can sometimes be negotiated. These include application fees, underwriting fees, mortgage rate lock fees and loan processing fees.

As a starting point, Bankrate lists the average closing costs by state, so you can have an indication of how reasonable your potential lender's fees are.