Dr. Oz just bought this $18 million mansion

Published: Friday, October 02, 2015 @ 11:57 AM
Updated: Sunday, October 04, 2015 @ 3:47 PM


            Louwana, a landmarked oceanfront estate designed by Addison Mizner in 1919, has sold for $18 million, according to courthouse records. Photo courtesy RobertStevens.com
Louwana, a landmarked oceanfront estate designed by Addison Mizner in 1919, has sold for $18 million, according to courthouse records. Photo courtesy RobertStevens.com

Trending on Facebook

More popular and trending stories

Television personality and heart surgeon Dr. Oz and his wife are evidently behind the purchase of Louwana, a landmarked house built in 1919 that changed hands last week via an $18 million deed, according to records filed with the Palm Beach County Clerk’s Office.

A three-year $5 million mortgage on the beachfront house bears the signatures of Mehmet C. Oz, better known simply as Dr. Oz, and his wife, author and television host Lisa Oz, courthouse records show.

>> Read more trending stories 

The 12-bedroom, 12,483-square-foot house has four fireplaces, a guest house, a cabana, a tennis court, a three-car garage and extensive gardens, according to its sales listings. There are also original Mizner details including a “Scheherazade” stairway, cypress ceilings and original blue octagonal tile floors and walls in the upstairs master bathroom. Louwana sits on a 1.2-acre lot with 150 feet of oceanfront, a little more than a half-mile south of the Palm Beach Country Club.

The house has a more informal floor plan, with almost all of the rooms capturing ocean views.

Dr. Oz has been a longtime visitor to Palm Beach, where his wife’s family has vacationed for decades, according to a story published several years ago in Palm Beach Life. Property records show Lisa Oz’s parents, Dr. Gerald and Emily Jane Lemole, own two houses on the island.

“Louwana is in a great location. It’s a charming, beautiful house,” said Cristina Condon, a Sotheby’s International Realty agent who said a confidentiality agreement prevented her from discussing the sale, the seller or the buyer.

Condon initially listed the house in early 2008 at $30 million. In 2013 the property was priced at $22 million. The house had been under contract since last year, said Condon. She didn’t provide a reason for the prolonged closing process.

“Every notable visitor or resident of Palm Beach either stayed or was entertained there over the years,” said historian Augustus Mayhew.

The town granted the house landmark status in 1980.

Trending - Most Read Stories

Far Hills Bob Evans property sold for $2.5M

Published: Friday, December 08, 2017 @ 4:59 PM
Updated: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 @ 4:23 PM

CONTRIBUTED
CONTRIBUTED

The sale of area and Ohio Bob Evans restaurant properties continues.

A New Albany outfit has purchased the property housing the Centerville-area Bob Evans restaurant for $2.5 million.

The 4,992-square-foot building and 1.25-acre site at 7115 Far Hills Ave. was sold to Timothy P. and Paula S. Heather, of New Albany, Ohio, according to Montgomery County property records.

RELATEDStarbucks property near UD has new owner

The new owners give the same address as the Bob Evans headquarters in New Albany.

The local franchise food site was built in 1986.

Bob Evans has been restructuring its business and selling its restaurants quickly. Back in May, a trio of Dayton-area Bob Evans restaurants sold for a total of $5.6 million.

At the time, Bob Evans Farms Inc. had divided its business by keeping its food production side and selling off its restaurant chain to private equity group Golden Gate Capital.

MORE$1M+ endorsed for companies planning to create 121 new jobs

Bob Evans Farms, Inc. said in January it intended to sell off its restaurants to focus on packaged foods.

Golden Gate Capital bought the restaurants for $565 million, and Bob Evans Farms bought Pineland Farms Potato Co. for $115 million.

Trending - Most Read Stories

Downtown Springfield historic site gets $2M for apartment renovations

Published: Tuesday, December 19, 2017 @ 11:24 AM


            The McAdams Building has been selected for the National Register of Historic Places. Bill Lackey/Staff
The McAdams Building has been selected for the National Register of Historic Places. Bill Lackey/Staff

A vacant building in downtown Springfield that was nearly torn down has received $2 million in state historic tax credits that will be used to renovate it for apartments.

The total cost to renovate the Edward Wren Co. Building, more recently known as the McAdams Building, will be more than $15.3 million, according to the Ohio Development Services Agency.

RELATED: Historic Springfield site faced demolition, now may be $17M apartments

The property at 31 E. High St was built in 1921 as a department store and bank in the heart of downtown Springfield, according to its tax credit application. It will be revitalized as 28 market-rate apartments with a ground floor restaurant space, the state agency says.

The project is one of 22 historic sites in 11 communities to share more than $28.3 million in Ohio Historic Preservation Tax Credits.

Trending - Most Read Stories

Springboro residents appeal proposed rezoning of neighboring land

Published: Friday, December 08, 2017 @ 12:00 AM

Heatherwoode residents protest proposed 7-lot residential rezoning

Residents of a local golf-course community appealed to the Springboro City Council on Thursday to reconsider the proposed rezoning of neighboring land for residential development.

The residents of the 212-home Heatherwoode community spoke during a public hearing on rezoning of 2.3 acres at 1360 S. Main St., just north of the entrance to the community, featuring the city-owned golf course.

RELATED: Residents opposing rezoning

The property owners, the Daniel Family Trust, are seeking rezoning to allow the development of a 7-lot subdivision at a density, following the dedication of 0.22 acres of right-of-way along South Main Street, of 3.29 units per acre.

MORE: Springboro sets aside $2 million for golf course

Streets on each side of the proposed development have seven homes backing onto the property “no more and no less than we request,” said Rebecca Geiger, representative for the property owners.

Two councilmembers, Carol Moore and Becky Iverson, live in the development but did not comment.

MORE: Minister, incumbent’s wife square off in Ward 2 election

The Heatherwoode Homeowners Association presented more than 100 signatures on petitions presented to the council at the public hearing.

Residents are concerned about the effect on their property values, and traffic and safety at rush hours and when school lets out across Ohio 741, Main Street in Springboro, at the junior high school.

Joe Westendorf, a Heatherwoode resident, said another road would have to be built for the development because the property owners declined to join the Heatherwoode community and be accessed by existing roads in the community.

“They had an opportunity,” he said. “So now we’re going to have one more road.”

Follow Lawrence Budd on Twitter

Association President Shawn Hunter said he discovered the proposed rezoning late last month when driving to the Christmas In Springboro festival.

“We really exist to preserve the community. Part of that is preserving the property values,” Hunter said.

City Manager Chris Pozzuto said it was uncertain how the development would affect property values.

“I can say generally, however, that historically, through many developments around the town, property values in Springboro have always increased over time,” he said before the meeting.

Residents are also concerned about the effect on tree lines and creeks shared by the developments.

Mayor John Agenbroad, who lives on South Main across the street from Heatherwoode, recused himself from the issue and left the meeting during the public hearing.

“I am one of the property members affected. I will not be involved whatsoever,” Agenbroad said during a work session before Thursday’s public hearing.

Vice Mayor Jim Chmiel said the council wasn’t going to vote on the rezoning until the Jan. 4 meeting.

Trending - Most Read Stories

Annexation vote expected Tuesday on 200 acres in Warren County

Published: Monday, November 27, 2017 @ 12:19 PM


            Warren County commissioners are expected to vote on Tuesday on annexation by South Lebanon of more than 200 acres, including the former Peters Cartridge Factory.
Warren County commissioners are expected to vote on Tuesday on annexation by South Lebanon of more than 200 acres, including the former Peters Cartridge Factory.

The Warren County Board of Commissioners is expected to vote on Tuesday on the proposed annexation of more than 220 acres, including the former Peters Cartridge Factory, by the Village of South Lebanon.

The annexation would enable the developer Bloomfield/Schon to avoid property taxes on improvements made through the $25 million redevelopment project to the Kings Local Schools.

RELATED: History of old ammunition factory

The area to be annexed by South Lebanon covers more than 222.7 acres, running from the existing village limits south down the riverfront bike path to US 22 and Ohio 3 and up the hill from the Peters Cartridge redevelopment site to a 67-acre farm.

RELATED: What to know about Peters Cartridge Factory redevelopment

Plans for more than $34 million in construction along the Little Miami River, including a new $9.5 million bridge, hinge on approval of annexation of the 14-acre Peters Cartridge Factory property and the other land by South Lebanon.

Developer Bloomfield/Schon is planning to convert the historic complex, where ammunition was made for almost a century, into 128 loft apartments, office space and a restaurant.

The development site is along the east bank of the Little Miami River. It fronts on a stretch of the multi-use trail along the east bank of the river. It was the site of a U.S. EPA cleanup.

The commissioners are expected to consider the annexation at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday during their regular meeting at the county administration building, 406 Justice Dr. in Lebanon.

Trending - Most Read Stories