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Historic farm development moves ahead in Springboro

Published: Wednesday, March 08, 2017 @ 9:20 PM

Springboro planners were kinder to a new plan for development of the Easton farm, but residents weren't.

The builder planning to turn a historic local farm into a community of almost 500 homes, an assisted city living center and retail development got a better response on Wednesday from the Springboro Planning Commission.

But Hills Properties’ latest plan for 86 acres of the Easton Farm got another thumbs-down from residents concerned about traffic, safety and other effects of the proposed development.

RELATED: City sends developer back to drawing board

Chief among the concerns expressed during the meeting was a density of about 12 residences an acre in some parts of the development.

“If you have a density of 12 plus whatever and you make that into a Garden of Eden and you pave the sidewalks with gold, you still have a density of 12,” resident Dale Siefferlen said.

The new plan, released last Friday by the city’s planning department, added a buffer sought by neighbors in adjoining developments as well as roads and trails through the development and leading north and south and east from the development onto existing neighborhood streets or Main Street, Ohio 741 in Springboro.

It also cut the number of homes proposed from 485 to 467 and made small changes in the sizes and density of development proposed. A mix of single and multi-family housing, as well as a commercial development, including a senior-living facility, restaurants and “convenience retail,” are proposed.

During his presentation Wednesday, Mike Copfer of Hills promised to complete a section of the city’s bike trail network through the development, including benches and other amenities.

Copfer also said he looked to planning staff to tell him what uses would and wouldn’t work in the planned unit development.

RELATED: Springboro rejected Easton Farm development plan in 2008 

Before the meeting, Becky Hall, an Easton who plans to continue living on the farm after the development, said she was in favor of the development only because her sister, who owns the other half of the farm, wanted to sell it to Hills.

During the meeting, Hall questioned how long it would take the city to approve the plan.

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If the commission recommends approval at its April 26 meeting, the city council would approve it no sooner than June 15, City Manager Chris Thompson said.

Before considering approval, commissioners and staff told Copfer he needed “at least one more work session” to submit a list of approved uses, develop the road system and finalize other details of the development.

Far Hills Bob Evans property sold for $2.5M

Published: Friday, December 08, 2017 @ 4:59 PM
Updated: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 @ 4:23 PM

CONTRIBUTED
CONTRIBUTED

The sale of area and Ohio Bob Evans restaurant properties continues.

A New Albany outfit has purchased the property housing the Centerville-area Bob Evans restaurant for $2.5 million.

The 4,992-square-foot building and 1.25-acre site at 7115 Far Hills Ave. was sold to Timothy P. and Paula S. Heather, of New Albany, Ohio, according to Montgomery County property records.

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The new owners give the same address as the Bob Evans headquarters in New Albany.

The local franchise food site was built in 1986.

Bob Evans has been restructuring its business and selling its restaurants quickly. Back in May, a trio of Dayton-area Bob Evans restaurants sold for a total of $5.6 million.

At the time, Bob Evans Farms Inc. had divided its business by keeping its food production side and selling off its restaurant chain to private equity group Golden Gate Capital.

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Bob Evans Farms, Inc. said in January it intended to sell off its restaurants to focus on packaged foods.

Golden Gate Capital bought the restaurants for $565 million, and Bob Evans Farms bought Pineland Farms Potato Co. for $115 million.

Downtown Springfield historic site gets $2M for apartment renovations

Published: Tuesday, December 19, 2017 @ 11:24 AM


            The McAdams Building has been selected for the National Register of Historic Places. Bill Lackey/Staff
The McAdams Building has been selected for the National Register of Historic Places. Bill Lackey/Staff

A vacant building in downtown Springfield that was nearly torn down has received $2 million in state historic tax credits that will be used to renovate it for apartments.

The total cost to renovate the Edward Wren Co. Building, more recently known as the McAdams Building, will be more than $15.3 million, according to the Ohio Development Services Agency.

RELATED: Historic Springfield site faced demolition, now may be $17M apartments

The property at 31 E. High St was built in 1921 as a department store and bank in the heart of downtown Springfield, according to its tax credit application. It will be revitalized as 28 market-rate apartments with a ground floor restaurant space, the state agency says.

The project is one of 22 historic sites in 11 communities to share more than $28.3 million in Ohio Historic Preservation Tax Credits.

Springboro residents appeal proposed rezoning of neighboring land

Published: Friday, December 08, 2017 @ 12:00 AM

Heatherwoode residents protest proposed 7-lot residential rezoning

Residents of a local golf-course community appealed to the Springboro City Council on Thursday to reconsider the proposed rezoning of neighboring land for residential development.

The residents of the 212-home Heatherwoode community spoke during a public hearing on rezoning of 2.3 acres at 1360 S. Main St., just north of the entrance to the community, featuring the city-owned golf course.

RELATED: Residents opposing rezoning

The property owners, the Daniel Family Trust, are seeking rezoning to allow the development of a 7-lot subdivision at a density, following the dedication of 0.22 acres of right-of-way along South Main Street, of 3.29 units per acre.

MORE: Springboro sets aside $2 million for golf course

Streets on each side of the proposed development have seven homes backing onto the property “no more and no less than we request,” said Rebecca Geiger, representative for the property owners.

Two councilmembers, Carol Moore and Becky Iverson, live in the development but did not comment.

MORE: Minister, incumbent’s wife square off in Ward 2 election

The Heatherwoode Homeowners Association presented more than 100 signatures on petitions presented to the council at the public hearing.

Residents are concerned about the effect on their property values, and traffic and safety at rush hours and when school lets out across Ohio 741, Main Street in Springboro, at the junior high school.

Joe Westendorf, a Heatherwoode resident, said another road would have to be built for the development because the property owners declined to join the Heatherwoode community and be accessed by existing roads in the community.

“They had an opportunity,” he said. “So now we’re going to have one more road.”

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Association President Shawn Hunter said he discovered the proposed rezoning late last month when driving to the Christmas In Springboro festival.

“We really exist to preserve the community. Part of that is preserving the property values,” Hunter said.

City Manager Chris Pozzuto said it was uncertain how the development would affect property values.

“I can say generally, however, that historically, through many developments around the town, property values in Springboro have always increased over time,” he said before the meeting.

Residents are also concerned about the effect on tree lines and creeks shared by the developments.

Mayor John Agenbroad, who lives on South Main across the street from Heatherwoode, recused himself from the issue and left the meeting during the public hearing.

“I am one of the property members affected. I will not be involved whatsoever,” Agenbroad said during a work session before Thursday’s public hearing.

Vice Mayor Jim Chmiel said the council wasn’t going to vote on the rezoning until the Jan. 4 meeting.

Annexation vote expected Tuesday on 200 acres in Warren County

Published: Monday, November 27, 2017 @ 12:19 PM


            Warren County commissioners are expected to vote on Tuesday on annexation by South Lebanon of more than 200 acres, including the former Peters Cartridge Factory.
Warren County commissioners are expected to vote on Tuesday on annexation by South Lebanon of more than 200 acres, including the former Peters Cartridge Factory.

The Warren County Board of Commissioners is expected to vote on Tuesday on the proposed annexation of more than 220 acres, including the former Peters Cartridge Factory, by the Village of South Lebanon.

The annexation would enable the developer Bloomfield/Schon to avoid property taxes on improvements made through the $25 million redevelopment project to the Kings Local Schools.

RELATED: History of old ammunition factory

The area to be annexed by South Lebanon covers more than 222.7 acres, running from the existing village limits south down the riverfront bike path to US 22 and Ohio 3 and up the hill from the Peters Cartridge redevelopment site to a 67-acre farm.

RELATED: What to know about Peters Cartridge Factory redevelopment

Plans for more than $34 million in construction along the Little Miami River, including a new $9.5 million bridge, hinge on approval of annexation of the 14-acre Peters Cartridge Factory property and the other land by South Lebanon.

Developer Bloomfield/Schon is planning to convert the historic complex, where ammunition was made for almost a century, into 128 loft apartments, office space and a restaurant.

The development site is along the east bank of the Little Miami River. It fronts on a stretch of the multi-use trail along the east bank of the river. It was the site of a U.S. EPA cleanup.

The commissioners are expected to consider the annexation at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday during their regular meeting at the county administration building, 406 Justice Dr. in Lebanon.