Your iPhone has a hidden feature that will read text out loud to you

Published: Friday, July 14, 2017 @ 1:11 PM

If you’re ever driving, running or in some other situation where you can’t look at your phone long enough to read an article or any other type of text, there’s a hidden feature that will totally change your life.

Hidden iPhone feature reads text to you out loud

Since the radio in my car stopped working — and it’s not worth the money to fix whatever it is that causes the fuze to continue to blow — I’ve had to find other ways to entertain myself on the road.

I have my list of podcasts that I listen to on a regular basis, but sometimes I just want to get caught up on the news of the day. And since I can’t read while I drive, I just use the “Speak Selection” tool on my iPhone that reads the articles to me out loud.

How it works and how to set it up

The feature has been around since iOS 5, but it comes automatically disabled, so most people don’t even realize it’s there. Once you enable it on your iPhone or iPad, the tool can read pretty much any text out loud.

Finding the feature isn’t very intuitive, but it only takes a few taps.

Follow these steps to enable the tool:

  • Settings
  • General
  • Accessibility
  • Speech
  • Turn “Speak Selection” on (it should currently be disabled).

Then any time you want your phone to read something aloud, use two fingers to swipe down at the top of the screen.

Siri will then start reading to you as a menu bar pops up, which allows you to pause and play as you wish. You can then hide the tool bar by tapping the “<” symbol on the top left — and tap it again to open it back up on the screen.

The speed is set to a pretty good pace, but you have the option to make it faster or slower. You can also change the voice — under the “Speech” menu, tap “Voices” to listen to the different options.

More tips & tricks:

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Disney theme park attendance drops as prices rise

Published: Sunday, June 04, 2017 @ 12:12 PM

Sunday marks an increase in prices for single-day tickets to Walt Disney World theme parks during certain times of year—as well as an addition of expiration dates on all tickets.

Could the House of Mouse be faltering?

In a rare reversal of attendance growth, a new report says fewer people came to 13 of 14 Disney theme parks worldwide in 2016 than in the year prior.

That’s according to independent numbers from the Themed Entertainment Association (TEA) and engineering firm Aecom. Disney does not share official attendance data for the majority of its properties.

Here’s a wild guess — maybe Disney’s endless march of increased ticket prices had something to do with the traffic decline!

Read more: How to visit Disney World for free (or close to it)

You can still save money on Disney if you know how!

Back in February, Disney jacked up its peak pricing strategy in a continuing effort to shift the price of a day pass based on demand.

It’s called “seasonal pricing,” and there are three periods: Value, regular and peak.

  • Value period pricing for the Magic Kingdom became $107 for adults and $101 for children — an increase of $2.
  • Regular period pricing became $115 for adults and $109 for children — a $5 increase.
  • Peak pricing, meanwhile, remained steady at $124 for adults and $118 for children.

Meanwhile, the price of an annual pass also increased in February. The Silver Pass is now priced at $419, the Gold Pass at $559 and the Platinum Pass at $679.

The peak pricing strategy seems to be working from a profit standpoint. Disney’s theme park unit enjoyed operating income of $3.3 billion in fiscal 2016. That’s a 9% increase from the year prior.

So don’t shed a tear for the House of Mouse just because guest traffic slowed down last year!

Disney Theme Parks is still the #1 theme park group in the world. According to the TEA report, Disney had twice the annual attendance of its next nearest competitor, the British-based theme parks operator Merlin Entertainments. And it had more than three times the attendance of the #3 competitor, Universal Parks and Resorts.

When you’re planning a Disney trip, you need every possible advantage on your side to save money. So don’t overlook these areas of savings…

Figure out the cheapest places to stay

If you want to stay on the property, try renting a timeshare. MouseOwners.com has resources for both owners and potential renters. MouseSavers.com also features a lot of info on how to save on the experience.

If you’re going to Disney World, you might consider off-site hotels around Orlando like the Four Season Orlando and Hard Rock Hotel. They’re luring more visitors than ever with competitive rates, water parks and complimentary transportation to area theme parks. Off-site may also turn out to be more affordable, especially if the family has a car.

One caveat to staying off-site: You’ll only be able to book FastPasses 30 days out from the start of your trip.

Know about the military discounts

If you’re military, you have earned the right to save on your Disney trip! ShadesofGreen.org is a special program offered for military personnel and families in partnership with Disney. Discounted lodging generally starts at $95 a night. Other discounts on park admission, dining and transportation are available too.

Use the free FastPass+ option

FastPass+ enables guests to reserve a spot in line at favorite rides prior to their trip. Once guests receive their theme park tickets, they can log into My Disney Experience on the Disney website or app and make an itinerary of preferred rides and attractions. This feature allows families guaranteed access and short wait times to some of the hottest attractions. Visitors who master FastPass+ can minimize the wait times and maximize the time they spend playing in the parks.

If you’re staying on a Disney property, you can begin lining up your FastPasses as soon as 60 days out from the start of your trip.

Have the right gear

Take ponchos from the dollar store with you for afternoon and evening thundershowers instead of buying overpriced ones at the park. Sure, they won’t have cute characters on them, but they’ll help you keep more of those other kinds of characters — like Washington, Lincoln, Hamilton, Jackson and Franklin — in your wallet!

Have the right reading material

Money expert Clark Howard has long recommended that you get “The Unofficial Guide to Walt Disney World,” not any of the official publications that come from Disney. This manual is updated yearly and tells you all kinds of money and time-saving tips that the parks don’t want you to know.

Go when it’s quiet

Even though the new dynamic demand pricing initiative won’t let you steal a deal, you’ll still want to plan your trip during a quieter time of the year if possible. You can get a sense of expected crowd sizes on sites like TouringPlans.com and WDWPrepSchool.com.

In general, fall is one of the best times for Florida vacations each year. Disney World offers discounts to Florida residents that fill the parks with daytrippers at that time of year. That creates some traffic, but not as much as you would have encountered over the summer. The real time to book, though, is during the first two weeks of December. Almost nobody goes on vacation at that time.

Use an app to plan your time in the park

A lot of families planning trips to the House of Mouse find it easy to coordinate all their planning in one app. TouringPlans is one great option, as is Trello. Give them a try!

Easiest way to schedule your kids’ free time this summer

Other stories you might like from Clark Howard:

Related

34 retailers likely to close or go broke before the end of 2017

Published: Sunday, May 28, 2017 @ 1:03 PM

Via @tvnewzguy / Twitter
Via @tvnewzguy / Twitter

The bloodbath at retail that’s seen more than 3,600 stores closures announced since January isn’t over yet.

We could reach the 10,000 store-closure mark by the end of the year, according to credit consulting service F&D Reports.

Read more: 2017 retail closings — What you need to know

Which retailers are next to fall?

F&D’s research has identified 34 retailers suffering from poor sales and too much overhead that it says will likely announces more store closures en masse or bankruptcy filings before the year is out.

  • Shopko
  • National Stores
  • Forever 21
  • Charming Charlie
  • Fresh Market
  • Bloomin’ Brands
  • Ascena
  • Tailored Brands
  • Rent-A-Center
  • Bravo Brio
  • Trans World
  • Fred’s
  • Rite-Aid
  • Conn’s
  • Tuesday Morning
  • Guitar Center
  • GNC
  • Neiman Marcus
  • Toys R Us
  • Sears Hometown
  • J. Crew
  • Noodles and Co.
  • Lumber Liquidators
  • Charlotte Russe
  • Bon-Ton Stores
  • Tops Markets
  • Claire’s
  • Ruby Tuesday
  • Sears Holdings
  • 99 Cents Only
  • Ignite
  • Perfumania
  • Le Chateau
  • Gymboree

It’s not just Amazon killing the brick-and-mortar stores!

We should note that some of the stores listed here — SearsBloomin’ Brands and Ruby Tuesday, in particular — have announced anywhere from dozens to more than 150 store closures this year already.

Meanwhile, it’s been widely reported that others like Gymboree and J. Crew are facing imminent bankruptcy.

Yet in the midst of all the media coverage, one important point is sometimes overlooked: It’s not just Amazon killing off the brick-and-mortars. It’s also that we’re way “over-stored” in the United States, as money expert Clark Howard would say.

“We have far too many retail locations, shopping centers and branches of different chains,” the consumer champ notes. “But stores that are meeting your needs with low prices will continue to thrive.”

The sad truth for ailing retailers is that we have 24 square feet of retail space for every person in the United States, according to F&D.

By comparison, Canada — the next country on the list with the most retail space — has 16 sq. ft. of retail space per capita.

Australia — the third most heavily retailed country in the world — has only 11 sq. ft. That’s less than half the square footage of retail space per capita that we have!

Read more: Lidl — Aldi’s archrival — announces first store openings

Liquidation sales underway at 138 J.C. Penney locations

Other stories you might like from Clark Howard:

3 Reasons most stock pickers don’t beat the market

Published: Sunday, May 28, 2017 @ 5:48 PM

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 09: Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) the morning after Donald Trump won a major upset in the presidential election on November 9, 2016 in New York City. Global markets originally dropped after Trump began to pull ahead of his rival Hillary Clinton. In morning trading The Dow was down slightly. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
Staff Writer
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 09: Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) the morning after Donald Trump won a major upset in the presidential election on November 9, 2016 in New York City. Global markets originally dropped after Trump began to pull ahead of his rival Hillary Clinton. In morning trading The Dow was down slightly. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)(Staff Writer)

It’s always been tough to be a successful stock picker on Wall Street.

It’s not that mutual fund managers can’t beat the market, but it’s very difficult to do so year in and year out: Large-cap stocks have delivered long-term, annual realized returns of about 7% after inflation during the past 100-plus years. For the 15-year stretch through December 2016, 92% of U.S. large-cap, actively managed equity funds underperformed the S&P 500, according to data collected by S&P Dow Indices.

Even during April, the 25th best month of performance in the past 26 years for such large-cap managers, only 63% of mutual funds beat their respective benchmarks, according to Bank of America Merrill Lynch.

And the pressure on stock pickers is mounting because of exchange-traded funds, which feature lower trading costs and returns that are often competitive with or better than those of professionally managed funds.

» The Best Strategies for Investing

Debating investing in individual equities or actively managed funds versus passive vehicles, such as ETFs? Here’s why it’s so difficult to pick a winner.

The fee hurdle

Before ETFs became so popular, mutual fund managers faced a simpler task: Pick stocks that performed better than the overall market, ideally better than the stocks their competitors picked. But with more investment choices comes more pressure. Active managers must now outperform by enough to make up for their funds’ higher costs relative to ETFs.

That additional burden can be significant. Equity mutual funds charged an average of 1.28% in annual administrative expenses — or what’s called an expense ratio — in 2016, compared with the 0.52% charged by the average equity ETF, according to data from the Investment Company Institute.

To match investors’ expectations from ETF returns, some portfolio managers create funds that mimic an index without completely duplicating it — what’s known as closet indexing. That can result in bloated or overly diversified portfolios that get dragged down by less-than-stellar picks. In addition, mutual fund managers often impose high redemption fees to discourage short-term trading, typically defined as holding shares for less than a year.

But costs alone don’t explain why stock pickers face such a challenge. Dynamics within the market also are partly to blame.

» 5 Ways to Put a Windfall to Good Use

Market correlation

When unrelated assets move in lock-step — what’s known as correlation — it’s that much harder for stock pickers to find the ones that will go up even more than the average.

The past seven years have been tough in this regard. Among the 11 sectors of the S&P 500, the average correlation to the broader index ranged from 70% to 95% between 2009 and 2016, before dipping to as low as 57% in February and March, according to figures compiled by Convergex, a U.S. brokerage firm.

This has provided “some oxygen for active managers to outperform,” wrote Nicholas Colas, chief market strategist at Convergex, in an April report. Even Goldman Sachs has proclaimed the current market conditions —  notably rising return dispersion — as a potential boon to skillful stock pickers.

» How to Spend (or Invest) Your Tax Return

The problem is, if analysts are right, these dynamics are likely temporary, which puts the longer-term fate of stock picking at peril. And remember, in addition to beating the market, active managers must also provide better returns than a comparable ETF to make up for their higher fees.

‘An inherent disadvantage’

One theory got some buzz earlier this year: The odds are stacked in favor of indexes, and it’s not a fair fight for stock pickers.

Returns for a particular index are heavily skewed to a few of its biggest winners, so a portfolio manager generally must invest in these stocks just to keep up with the index’s performance. Picking a subset of stocks increases the odds those picks will underperform versus the index, according to a 2015 paper written by J.B. Heaton, Nick Polson and Jan Hendrik Witte, with a February update by Hendrik Bessembinder of Arizona State University.

“Active managers do not start out on an even playing field with passive investing. Rather, active managers must overcome an inherent disadvantage,” the authors concluded. And Bessembinder notes that compounding only increases that disadvantage over time.

What’s an investor to do?

There are many advantages of index-based funds and ETFs for individual investors. But that doesn’t mean you should dump all of your individual equities or actively managed funds and convert to just any passive vehicle. Not all index funds and ETFs are created alike. There are even some actively managed ETFs which come with higher fees.

Still, the explosion of these assets has given investors more options. If you’re dissatisfied with the longer-term performance of your mutual funds, consider making the switch. Do your homework first, paying attention to fees, commissions and the assets included in the ETFs you’re considering.

If you think you can beat the odds stacked against professional stock pickers, tread with caution. Don’t invest with money you’ll need for short-term expenses or put your entire retirement nest egg at stake.

Anna-Louise Jackson is a staff writer at NerdWallet, a personal finance website. Email: ajackson@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @aljax7.

Forgotten lottery ticket worth $24 million found days before deadline

Published: Thursday, May 25, 2017 @ 3:11 PM

A lottery player’s luck almost ran out this week after a ticket worth more than $24 million was nearly forgotten in their home.

An anonymous individual with a Lotto ticket came forward to claim the winnings two days before their ticket was set to expire.

News coverage of the unclaimed Lottery prize escalated in the days leading up the deadline, causing the individual to check their house, where they discovered the winning ticket in a pile of other old tickets, the New York Lottery said.

The individual went to a lottery office in Lower Manhattan on Tuesday. The ticket was set to expire Thursday.

>> Read more trending news

Lottery rules allow winners to claim their prize up to a year after a drawing.

“We are thrilled that this lucky winner was able to locate this life-changing ticket,” said Gweneth Dean, director of the Commission’s Division of the Lottery. “We look forward to introducing this multimillionaire who came forward in the nick of time.”

The New York Lottery said they will reveal the identity of the winner after a security background check review.

The winning numbers were 05-12-13-22-25-35 and the bonus number was 51.