Ohio’s unemployment rate holds steady in March at 5.1 percent

Published: Friday, April 21, 2017 @ 10:15 AM


            New York Times
New York Times

Ohio’s unemployment rate was 5.1 percent in March, unchanged from the previous month, the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services reported today.

Ohio’s nonagricultural wage and salary employment decreased 4,100 over the month, from a revised 5,522,800 in February to 5,518,700 in March.

The number of workers unemployed in Ohio in March was 294,000, unchanged from February. The number of unemployed has increased by 9,000 in the past 12 months from 285,000. The March unemployment rate for Ohio increased from 5.0 percent in March 2016.

The U.S. unemployment rate for March was 4.5 percent, 0.2 percentage points lower than in February, and 0.5 percentage points lower than in March 2016.

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Kettering manufacturing property sells for $2.15 million.

Published: Friday, February 23, 2018 @ 4:17 PM

Northwestern Tools Inc.
Northwestern Tools Inc.

The new home of machine tooling company Northwestern Tools in Kettering has sold for $2.15 million, Montgomery County property records show.

The sale was recorded Wednesday, with Davis and Davis Tool identified as the seller and Siva Properties LLC named in records as the buyer.

Brian Thomeczek, chief executive of the family-0wned company, said Friday Northwestern Tools is already in the building.

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Last November, the city of Kettering applied for $100,000 in Montgomery County development funds to assist Northwestern’s $2.7 million move to that building.

Northwestern wanted to move about two miles from 3130 Valleywood Drive to the 6-acre property at 4800 Hempstead Station, and Kettering received $80,000 from the county to help the move.

The county expects the company to create 25 new jobs while retaining 40 current ones as a result of the move.

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Northwestern was founded in 1942 by Gene Thomeczek. Today, the company serves the aerospace, medical and other markets with more than 2,000 products.

Located near Interstate 675, the building offers 9,632 square feet of manufacturing space. Dave Tobeson, senior vice president with Cushman and Wakefield, was the listing broker.

“It’s a beautiful building they went into,” Tobeson said Friday.

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Should you talk about your pay? Career experts weigh in

Published: Friday, February 23, 2018 @ 10:20 AM

Pay transparency helps workers understand their earnings in relation to the salaries of their peers Make sure you're allowed to talk about pay levels Pay is still a touchy subject so be discreet Consider talking outside the office Once you have shared your earnings, don't expect to get the same information in return

Even with nearly every cultural taboo thrown to the wind− from discussing sexual orientation to politics; one last conversational taboo still exist among Americans − how much we get paid.

»RELATED: As of today, the average American woman started working for free

"These days, it's okay to talk about the troubles we're having with our children or even our marriages," noted one blogger from PayScale. "We can talk about race, religion, identity, etc., outside of work. But, do we talk with each other about our salaries? Oh goodness, absolutely not. That's way too personal, and it's a conversation fraught with danger."

But what if this is a mistake? Salary transparency at work can be beneficial right on down the line. First, it could ultimately help right the gender pay gap. (Think about what might have happened if Michelle Williams had learned in conversation early on that she was getting literally millions less than Mark Walhberg for the reshoot of “All the Money in the World”, for example.) 

"Pay transparency helps workers understand their earnings in relation to the salaries of their peers," PayScale noted. "Openly sharing our financial truth with one another, both inside and outside of the office, is one of the best weapons we have against it."

Openly talking about earnings can also support job satisfaction and employee retention. PayScale studies have shown that people most often leave their jobs over pay issues, for example. But 55 percent of the respondents who thought they were being underpaid actually weren't, a factor that would be eliminated if people talked readily about their earnings.

On an individual level, though, there are two strong points of view about whether you should talk about what you earn with co-workers.

In a 2015 Huffington Post article , the answer to "Should you talk about what you earn" was a loud, yes.

"If you want to make sure you're being paid fairly, go ahead and talk to your co-workers about how much you make. Seriously," HuffPost said. 

The article cites the now landmark case of Erica Baker, a former Google engineer, who posted a shared spreadsheet asking co-workers to reveal their salaries. About 5 percent of her co-workers responded, Baker noted in a Tweet.

"People asked for and got equitable pay," she tweeted, "based on the data in the sheet."

But the "go ahead, it's all good" mentality is by no means widespread even three years later. In an early 2018 LinkedIn viewpoint roundup, based on an anonymous spreadsheet of entertainment employee salaries being shared widely that week, biotechnology executive Barrett S. McGrath gave a top-rated answer to the question, "Should you tell your co-workers what you earn?"

His final answer: "No, no, hell no. Never discuss comp with coworkers."

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McGrath based his answer on advice from his first district manager. 

"He told me, 'There is absolutely nothing good that can come from discussing salary and compensation with a co-worker, ever. At best, everyone feels fine because comp about the same. Inevitably, one of the two parties will be compensated less. A person who, just prior to the conversation, felt perfectly fine about their job and comp, now does not."

No matter whether you side with McGrath or Payscale, it's a tricky wicket. 

Other business experts shared these tips to help make the decision, and, if you decide to talk, how to go about it:

Make sure you're allowed to. Supervisors aren't protected under federal law, according to the Huffpost piece, and neither are government employees, though typically their pay levels are publicly available. 

Be discreet. Pay is still a pretty touchy subject, Huffpost noted, adding, "Don't corner your colleague in the bathroom and demand to see his pay stub." 

Choose your words. HP advised something like, "Hey, I want to make sure I'm being paid fairly. Would you mind telling me how much you make?" Also assure your colleague you'll keep his name out of any salary negotiations you initiate.

Consider talking outside the office. Talk over a cocktail or coffee.

Speak for yourself. "Once you have shared your earnings, don't necessarily expect to get the same information in return," PayScale advised. "Although being open about pay might be good for us, it's a personal choice. Don't share what you earn because you want someone to return the favor. Leave that decision to them."

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BB&T recovering after 'technical issue' left customers without access to accounts, cash

Published: Friday, February 23, 2018 @ 9:52 AM
Updated: Friday, February 23, 2018 @ 11:40 AM

BB&T Outage Leaves Customers Without Access to Their Accounts, Cash

Millions of BB&T customers were locked out of their accounts Thursday night and Friday morning due to an outage that bank officials said was caused by a "technical issue."

The interruption of services was first reported Thursday night and appeared to last until just before noon Friday.

>> Read more trending news

“At this time, many of our services are unavailable, including digital banking, Phone24, and ATM. Thank you for your patience as we work diligently to restore your services. We will continue to provide updates here and on http://BBT.com,” officials with the Winston-Salem-based bank wrote Thursday night on Twitter.

WSOCTV tried Friday morning to access a BB&T ATM in uptown Charlotte, but the message “Sorry, this ATM is temporarily offline," was displayed on the screen.

The company's website said many of its other banking services were down as well, including digital banking and Phone24, meaning customers couldn’t pay bills or check their accounts.

The issue appeared to be resolved before noon Friday.

“As our systems being to recover, our ATMs and automated Phone24 service are now available,” BB&T officials said in a statement around 11 a.m. Friday.

During the outage, bank customers were still able to use debit, credit and prepaid cards at places like the grocery store or gas station.

A bank spokesperson told WSOCTV, "We understand this is causing a major inconvenience for clients and our teams are continuing to work diligently to restore those services. We will work with clients who have incurred fees or experienced other challenges and continue to provide updates through our website and social media. At this time, we have no reason to believe this issue is related to cybersecurity."

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Dayton web curating company gets Silicon Valley shoutout

Published: Friday, February 23, 2018 @ 10:32 AM

Arielle Jordan at work. CONTRIBUTED
Arielle Jordan at work. CONTRIBUTED

If you have worthwhile content, a sizable social media following and the vision to monetize all of that, then Arielle Jordan would like a word with you.

Jordan, of Miamisburg, is the creator of Curafied, a new Internet platform that enables users to place what they believe is expert, valuable content behind a paywall for publication in a user-friendly, ad-free environment.

Users on Curafied — the company name can be seen as a variation on “curated” as in “curated content” — receive subscription funds for access to their content.

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“They’ll receive a dollar per subscriber per month,” Jordan said in a phone interview Friday. “It’s free for them to sign up to use our platform.”

Curafied aims for seamless transactions for users, handling payments and offering an array of features, such as the uploading of PDFs and charts.

“It’s behind a paywall,” she said. “It’s a way for people to directly monetize their content.”

Curafied can be a home for expert instruction in, say, auto maintenance or martial arts, arts and crafts or history. The content can range from posts to photos to videos.

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“It’s less than a cup of coffee for all of this information,” Jordan said.

Posting mechanics are similar to Facebook, but ad-free. It’s also meant to be a friendly environment for customers, too.

“When you’re connected with an expert whose content you enjoy, but you don’t want to see on Facebook all those ads and trolls and all kinds of other junk mixed in … it would be nice if these people had their own place to go,” Jordan said.

Curafied has enjoyed local support from the Entrepreneurs Center in Dayton and the area start-up support system. She was part of a series of workshops the center held last summer on how to obtain ESP (Entrepreneurial Signature Program) funding.

RELATEDDayton’s ‘Tech Start up of the Year’ launches new app partnership

She has also worked with the software wizards at Webster Station-based Mile Two on getting alpha and beta versions of Curafied up and running.

That support helped her take her business idea from “being an idea on a napkin” to “an actual, legitimate” business.

Jeff Graley, Mile Two president, likes how Jordan has turned an idea into "action." 

“Her idea has as much upside as anything we have going on in Dayton region right now in the startup space," he said. 

She calls her company “100-percent Dayton made and funded.” She has lived in Springfield and Butler County’s West Chester Twp. but now she calls Montgomery County home.

But lately Jordan has gotten an important national nod from the Women’s Startup Lab, a Menlo Park, Calif.-based tech accelerator that focuses on women-run businesses.

“Silicon Valley has a lot of heavy players, particularly in digital and social media,” Jordan said. “For them to want to accept me into that environment is really cool.”

While she doesn’t immediately know what acceptance into that accelerator will mean for Curafied, she is confident she and Curafied will remain Dayton-based.

”I don’t plan on moving,” she said.

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