Ohio sheds nearly 6K jobs in April

Published: Friday, May 19, 2017 @ 9:43 AM
Updated: Friday, May 19, 2017 @ 10:05 AM


            Construction continued late last year on Dayton Children’s Hospital’s new eight-story, 260,000 square-foot patient tower, which is scheduled to be completed in June. Ohio construction firms shed 7,400 jobs last month, according to the most recent figures from the state jobs department. LISA POWELL / STAFF
Construction continued late last year on Dayton Children’s Hospital’s new eight-story, 260,000 square-foot patient tower, which is scheduled to be completed in June. Ohio construction firms shed 7,400 jobs last month, according to the most recent figures from the state jobs department. LISA POWELL / STAFF

Ohio’s unemployment rate edged down to 5 percent in April from 5.1 percent in March even as employers statewide eliminated 5,700 jobs over the same period, the Ohio Department of Jobs and Family Services announced Friday.

RELATED: Many Ohioans still struggling despite low unemployment

The biggest job losses were in construction and manufacturing, which last month shed 7,400 and 5,800 jobs, respectively, according to the jobs report. The losses offset gains in professional and business services (+6,100), and leisure and hospitality (+5,000).

Jon Keeling, a spokesman for the state jobs department, attributed the loss of construction jobs to seasonal adjustments “since it seems most construction workers were hired earlier this year.” Since December 2016, construction jobs are up by 8,200, Keeling noted.

The decrease in the manufacturing sector was largely the result of temporary layoffs by Chrysler as they shift production of the Jeep Cherokee out of Toledo to make room for the next generation Jeep Wrangler, Keeling said. Chrysler has indicated all of those jobs will return.

RELATED: Jobless rates jump in every Ohio county

Overall, 288,000 Ohioans were unemployed in April, down 5,000 from 293,000 in March, according to the report, which showed the number of unemployed has increased by 5,000 in the past 12 months from 283,000.

At the same time, Ohio’s labor force — or the number of people working or actively seeking jobs — grew by 21,000, pushing the state’s labor force participation rate to 63.1 percent — slightly above the national rate of 62.9 percent in April.

“Workers enter the labor force when they have confidence in the economy, and Ohio’s labor force has been surging over the past year,” Keeling said, noting Ohio’s labor force has grown by 76,000 over the past 12 months.

The U.S. labor force grew by 12,000 last month as the national unemployment rate fell to 4.4 percent, down from 4.5 percent in March.

Dayton office vacancy rate higher in Ohio but improving

Published: Thursday, August 17, 2017 @ 8:35 AM
Updated: Thursday, August 17, 2017 @ 8:53 AM


            111 W. First St. where Taylor Communications has moved about 700 employees. CORNELIUS FROLIK / STAFF
111 W. First St. where Taylor Communications has moved about 700 employees. CORNELIUS FROLIK / STAFF

Dayton’s overall office vacancy rate may be high compared to other cities, but it is improving, recent property reports show.

The overall vacancy rate was 22.7 percent in the second quarter of 2017, an improvement from 24.8 percent in the second quarter last year, according to a quarterly report from commercial real estate brokers Cushman & Wakefield.

And a report from real estate services firm Colliers International says vacancy in the Dayton office market peaked at 23.1 percent at the end of 2015 — but has since improved for six straight quarters, thanks to steady leasing activity and no new supply of available office space.

“Dayton’s vacancy rate is higher than other Ohio markets, but the story is that a recovery has been underway with a strong gain in occupancy driving the vacancy rate down by 1.5 percentage points since the end of 2015,” said Loren DeFilippo, Ohio research director for Colliers.

Dayton’s office vacancy rates are high compared to other Ohio cities, Cushman & Wakefield’s national report shows.

RELATED: Dayton Freight expansion gets state tax credit to add 51 jobs

Dayton’s overall second quarter vacancy rate of 22.7 percent was higher than Cincinnati’s (21.4 percent), Columbus’ (13.4 percent) and Cleveland’s (11 percent).

Still, the trend in Dayton has been positive. Direct vacancy across the Dayton market has improved for six straight quarters, the Cushman report said.

MORE: Taylor Communications to move hundreds of workers downtown

“The vacancy rate has been steadily declining for the entire Dayton office market,” said Jarrett Hicks associate market director-research for Cushman.

The quarter’s bigger events included Taylor Communications moving hundreds of workers into the 111 building (111 W. First St.) in Dayton’s Central Business District, taking up 132,000 square feet in that building; Dayton Children’s Hospital moving into Building 3 of Dayton’s Tech Town Business Park, taking 22,861 square feet; and law firm Sebaly Shillito & Dyer renewing a lease in the Kettering Tower downtown.

The top sale of the second quarter was identified as Dayton Freight Lines Inc. paying $8.5 million for more than 130,000-square feet at Sand Lake Plaza off Poe Avenue in Vandalia.

New store opens at The Greene in Beavercreek

Published: Thursday, August 17, 2017 @ 8:50 AM

The Greene Town Center seen from the air

A new puzzle shop has opened at The Greene Town Center in Beavercreek.

Puzzle Plus, a family-owned puzzle store, sells jigsaws, brain teasers, puzzle books and games. The store carries games and puzzles for all ages and skill levels. The puzzle store opened in 1995 in Beavercreek, but just moved to a new location at The Greene at 4465 Glengarry Drive. That’s next to Tilly’s and across from the Beech Parking Garage.

“Puzzles Plus is a family-owned retail store selling jigsaw puzzles, games, brain teasers, puzzle books, all-age toys, and children’s toys. We have the best selection of jigsaw puzzles in the Miami Valley and a unique variety of games and toys,” according to its website.

This news organization has reached out to the store for more information.

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UD students a part of patent for energy-saving dishwashers by Hobart

Published: Thursday, August 17, 2017 @ 8:35 AM


            Dana Zechar/STAFF
Dana Zechar/STAFF

Engineering students from the University of Dayton are on the verge of being named on a patent with Hobart, the international food services company based in Troy.

Seven of UD’s Engineering students will be listed on a Hobart non-provisional patent filing for an innovation that assists in trapping heat in industrial dishwashers found in cafeterias and restaurants, according to UD.

The non-provisional patent filing will be published in early 2018 on the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office’s website. After that, the innovation will be inspected over two to three years to determine if it “meets certain standards of inventiveness” for a patent, according to Hobart engineering manager Alexander Anim-Mensah.

»RELATED: Dayton innovators: UD researcher measures success in aviation, energy

As many know, when a dishwasher opens, a plume of hot air escapes. This is what the group of students sought to fix. The students wanted to protect the operator from the blast of heat, improve drying, and reduce energy costs needed to re-heat the dishwasher, according to UD.

The group of students estimate that the invention will improve energy efficiency by at least 5 percent and drying efficiency by at least 25 percent.

“That is huge for an already energy-efficient machine. In an age where energy is getting expensive and standards keep rising, every bit counts. Given the average life of these machines is more than seven years, operators will enjoy the cost-saving benefits from the invention,” Anim-Mensah said.

The team started in 2015 with four students, who started by creating a solid barrier to block the dishwasher’s opening. Three other students joined the project a year later.

»RELATED: 5 patents that show the inventive genius of Daytonians

“This project has helped me apply concepts learned in class. I would tell anyone looking to do something like this to be open to exploring new ideas and concepts. That’s how we’ve been successful,” Prasanna Murlidharan, current UD renewable and clean energy graduate student, said.

This is not the only success of UD’s School of Engineering’s Innovation Center. In the past two decades, UD students have worked on more than 1,000 projects with more than 200 industry partners, according to UD.

Students collaborated with Hobart, as the company has been associated with UD for more than a decade.

“Hobart has been a strong supporter of our Innovation Center and assisting our students with experiential learning opportunities for more than 15 years. The opportunity Hobart has given our students to be part of this patent process is one not many get as an undergraduate,” Becky Blust, Innovation Center director, said.

Hobart is a subsidiary of ITW Food Equipment Group LLC.

For more information, visit here.

New gift shop opens in Beavercreek

Published: Thursday, August 17, 2017 @ 7:58 AM

FILE
FILE

A new gift and flower shop is opening in Beavercreek this month.

May Flower and Gift is celebrating its grand opening and ribbon-cutting ceremony on Aug. 28 at 10 a.m. The store sells a variety of fresh flowers and creative gift ideas for different budgets and styles. The store also offers local and worldwide delivery, and offers daily floral delivery to local funeral homes and hospitals.

The store is located at 1291 N. Fairfield Road.

May Flower and Gift also has a website where customers can go online to order their gifts and flowers. Orders can also be placed at 937-306-8651.

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