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Medical staffing company with Dayton presence to hire 150 people

Published: Monday, January 09, 2017 @ 12:54 PM


            Next Medical Staffing will move into new offices by April. STAFF PHOTO
Next Medical Staffing will move into new offices by April. STAFF PHOTO

Health Carousel, a medical staffing company with a presence in the Miami Valley, announced it will hire 150 more people in Ohio.

The Cincinnati-based company has acquired Columbus-based Medical Staffing Options. This is the second acquisition in two years for the company, part of its aggressive plans for growth. Health Carousel plans to hire as many as 150 internal employees in 2017, including 75 sales & recruiting positions, across the Cincinnati, Dayton and Columbus markets.

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“We are thrilled to welcome MSO into the Health Carousel family of brands,” said Health Carousel CEO Bill DeVille. “Their outstanding sales culture and history of success makes this an ideal partnership. This will further our goal of becoming one of the leading healthcare staffing firms in the US.”

In October, Health Carousel also acquired Next Medical Staffing, which has an office at 7810 McEwen Road in Washington Twp. Health Carousel plans to move the Next Medical offices to the five-story Progress Park Tower in Austin Landing. They also received a six-year tax credit from the state.

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The company’s current location is about 15,000 square feet, and its new location will be at least 49,000 to 52,000 square feet.

Ty Nelson, the president of Health Carousel, told the Dayton Daily News back in December, that Next Medical Staffing has about 37 employees on the payroll, and is hiring for 15 more positions. In addition to its Cincinnati headquarters, Health Carousel has affiliate offices in Dayton, Columbus and the Philippines.

For information on open positions, candidates can visit: healthcarousel.com/growth.

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Chipotle food issues: Does your local restaurant have violations?

Published: Friday, July 21, 2017 @ 1:45 PM

Chipotle: 5 Fast Facts

Chipotle’s stock has taken a hit this week following foodborne illness issues at a restaurant in Virginia and a report of rodents scurrying around one of their restaurants in Texas.

Chipotle executives told Business Insider that the chain temporarily closed a restaurant in Sterling, Va., after a small number of customers reported symptoms like vomiting, diarrhea, stomach pain, dehydration and nausea. 

Chipotle said they are aware of the issue, and communicated with local health officials in Virginia. The restaurant was closed for a “thorough sanitization,” the restaurant chain said, and it has now reopened. Chipotle officials said the reported symptoms were consistent with norovirus, a common cause of viral gastroenteritis.

Signs and symptoms of norovirus usually begin within 12 to 48 hours after exposure to the virus, according to the Mayo Clinic. Norovirus can be spread through contaminated food or water or an infected person. The virus can cause diarrhea, throwing up and stomach pain.

RELATED: Chipotle investigating credit card data breach

This isn’t the first time Chipotle has had issues with food-related illnesses. The company was hit by multiple outbreaks of E. coli in 2015, causing hundreds of customers to get sick.

The Dayton Daily News has taken a look at recent inspection reports by the Dayton-Montgomery County Public Health at Chipotle, and found some restaurants had multiple customer complaints at locations nationwide.

Locally complaints of food-borne illnesses or cleanliness go to local health departments, which are responsible for inspecting local restaurants. Hundreds of complaints come in to local health departments every year; in 2016 the Dayton-Montgomery County Public Health Department received complaints involving 5 Chipotle restaurants.

Some local Chipotle complaints were:

1. CENTERVILLE CHIPOTLE - 1051 MIAMISBURG CENTERVILLE ROAD

In late May, health officials with the Dayton-Montgomery County Public Health inspected the restaurant after a customer issued a complaint to the local health department regarding a possible food borne illness. Health officials were told that no employees called off work sick or were sent home sick during the time of the alleged illness, and they were also informed that the facility did not receive any phone calls or other responses regarding ill customers, according to a health inspection report.

The restaurant staff was informed to ensure gloves and utensils are used to handle foods, and officials recommended that food temperatures be monitored multiple times everyday. No further action was required, according to the report.

2. DAYTON CHIPOTLE - 1211 BROWN ST. 

A recent standard inspection by Dayton-Montgomery County Public Health officials found the overall operation of the restaurant was satisfactory, and food code updates were discussed during the inspection. Earlier in the year, the restaurant received a complaint about workers not wearing hair restraints. The issue was discussed with restaurant management and no further action was taken.

3. DAYTON CHIPOTLE - 9208 N. MAIN ST. 

The restaurant received two complaints in 2016, according to Dayton-Montgomery County Public Health inspection reports. A customer was concerned with air vents leaking condensation into food items, and the restaurant explained they were working to repair a hood system to draw humid air out. They agreed to wipe off condensation to protect food items.

RELATED: Chipotle closes restaurant after reports of customer illness

A complaint was also investigated last year about a bug found in a customer’s meal, but the past two months of pest control reports showed no signs of pest activity and no bugs were found during the inspection. No follow-up was needed, according to the report.

4. MIAMISBURG CHIPOTLE - 10671 INNOVATION DRIVE

The restaurant’s latest inspection report showed the operation is satisfactory, but the location had at least four reported complaints in 2016. A customer complained in April 2016 that they became ill after eating at the establishment, and management stated about three employees had been ill around the time of the incident.

The store was shut down and cleaned and food prepared by ill employees was discarded, according to health inspection reports. Multiple inspections were completed by state officials following the incident, and performance was satisfactory.

5. BEAVERCREEK CHIPOTLE - 4472 WALNUT ST. 

The restaurant had at least two reported complaints this year, and an inspection found “critical violations” in January. The person in charge failed to ensure employees of their responsibility to report information about their health as it relates to illnesses that could impact the food being served.

Employees were also found eating and drinking from open cups in the work areas. Guacamole was prepared and not checked for temperature prior to placing in walk-cooler, according to Greene County health inspection reports. New rules were discussed with management, according to the last report filed in January.

Chipotle officials said the restaurant chain has hired a food safety expert, Dr. Jim Marsden, to oversee all aspects of its food safety program. Chipotle has also implemented new food safety protocols in all restaurants. Nearly all Chipotle locations are company-owned.

“We are sorry that individuals reported sickness from one of our locations. The safety and well-being of our customers is always our top priority. Our Sterling, VA, restaurant has reopened for business,” said Steve Ells, Chipotle CEO. “We believe these advancements, among others, have put us at the top of our industry as we continually strive to find new and innovative ways to ensure that our restaurants are safe. We know that maintaining the highest level of safety in all of our restaurants is our responsibility. I made a commitment on behalf of Chipotle to make our restaurants the safest place to eat, and I am confident in the programs and procedures we have implemented.”

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Chipotle food scare highlights issue that impacts thousands annually

Published: Friday, July 21, 2017 @ 8:29 PM


            Local stores impacted by Chipotle data breach created on Tuesday 5/30/2017 at 8:36:24 am by Kara Driscoll Cutline 1editfornewsEngin.18525592_chipotleprobs.jpg A customer carries a Chipotle order at a restaurant in Miami. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Local stores impacted by Chipotle data breach created on Tuesday 5/30/2017 at 8:36:24 am by Kara Driscoll Cutline 1editfornewsEngin.18525592_chipotleprobs.jpg A customer carries a Chipotle order at a restaurant in Miami. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Chipotle is grappling with more cases of foodborne illness, an issue that causes one in six Americans to get sick annually after consuming contaminated foods or beverages.

The company’s stock has taken a hit this week following foodborne illness issues at a restaurant in Virginia and a report of rodents scurrying around at one of their restaurants in Texas. Chipotle executives told Business Insider that the chain temporarily closed the restaurant in Sterling, Va., after a small number of customers reported symptoms like vomiting, diarrhea, stomach pain, dehydration and nausea.

Chipotle officials said the reported symptoms were consistent with norovirus, a common cause of viral gastroenteritis.

» Chipotle food issues: Does your local restaurant have violations?

This isn’t the first time Chipotle has had issues with food-related illnesses. The company was hit by multiple outbreaks of E. coli in 2015, causing dozens of customers to get sick. No deaths were reported related to the outbreaks.

“As a member of the Food Safety Advisory Council at Chipotle, I’ve observed the systems the company has put in place to control norovirus,” said Elisabeth Hagen, former Chief Medical Officer and Undersecretary for Food Safety at the USDA. “They are among the best in the food industry. Despite, these efforts, no company is immune from norovirus risks.”

Every year, 48 million Americans gets sick by consuming contaminated foods or beverages, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CDC officials also estimate norovirus causes 19 to 21 million cases each year in the U.S. It attributes to 570 to 800 deaths yearly, mostly among young children and adults.

The Dayton Daily News examined recent inspection reports by the Dayton-Montgomery County Public Health at Chipotle locations. Hundreds of complaints come in to the local health department every year for various restaurants; in 2017 the Dayton-Montgomery County Public Health Department has received complaints involving at least five Chipotle restaurants.

» RELATED: Chipotle investigating credit card data breach

Some of the incidents included locations like the Centerville Chipotle on 1051 Miamisburg Centerville Road. In late May, officials with the health department inspected the restaurant after a customer issued a complaint to the local health department regarding a possible food borne illness.

Health officials were told that no employees called off work sick or were sent home sick during the time of the alleged illness, and they were also informed that the facility did not receive any phone calls or other responses regarding ill customers, according to a health inspection report.

The restaurant staff was informed to ensure gloves and utensils are used to handle foods, and officials recommended that food temperatures be monitored multiple times everyday. No further action was required, according to the report.

Another Chipotle in Beavercreek, located at 4472 Walnut St., had at least two reported complaints this year, and an inspection found “critical violations” in January. The person in charge failed to ensure employees of their responsibility to report information about their health as it relates to illnesses that could impact the food being served.

» RELATED: Chipotle closes restaurant after reports of customer illness

Employees were also found eating and drinking from open cups in the work areas. Guacamole was prepared and not checked for temperature prior to placing in walk-cooler, according to Greene County health inspection reports. New rules were discussed with management, according to the last report filed in January.

Chipotle officials said the restaurant chain has hired a food safety expert, Dr. Jim Marsden, to oversee all aspects of its food safety program. Chipotle has also implemented new food safety protocols in all restaurants. Nearly all Chipotle locations are company-owned.

“We are sorry that individuals reported sickness from one of our locations. The safety and well-being of our customers is always our top priority,” said Steve Ells, Chipotle CEO. “We believe these advancements, among others, have put us at the top of our industry as we continually strive to find new and innovative ways to ensure that our restaurants are safe. We know that maintaining the highest level of safety in all of our restaurants is our responsibility. I made a commitment on behalf of Chipotle to make our restaurants the safest place to eat, and I am confident in the programs and procedures we have implemented.”

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BY THE NUMBERS

• 48 MILLION people get sick from a foodborne illness every year

• 128,000 people are hospitalized due to foodborne illness every year

• 3,000 people die every year from foodborne illnesses

Source: CDC

Bacon cravings push pork prices higher

Published: Friday, July 21, 2017 @ 9:19 AM

FILE
FILE

Your love of bacon is causing pork-belly prices to reach record highs.

As more and more people reach for a pack of bacon at the grocery store, pig farmers are struggling to keep up the demand, according to a report from the Wall Street Journal. Pork-belly, the part of the hog used to make bacon, have risen around 80 percent in 2017.

Americans bought 14 percent more bacon at stores in 2016 compared to 2013, according to data from Nielsen. Bacon has become a staple in breakfast sandwiches, BLTs, lunch sandwiches and other trendy recipes like Cheesy Bacon Popcorn, Bacon Kraut, Bacon-Wrapped Scallops and Bacon Grits.

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Even fast-food chains are adding specialty bacon dishes like Arby’s “triple thick” bacon sandwiches, Wendy’s Bacon Queso Burger and Bacon Queso Fries or Frisch’s Primetime BLT Cheeseburger.

“Everybody and their mother is coming out with a new bacon sandwich,” livestock trader Dan Norcini told the Wall Street Journal.

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Bacon craze causes rise in pork-belly prices

Published: Friday, July 21, 2017 @ 8:29 PM


            Contributed
Contributed

Consumers love of bacon is causing pork-belly prices to reach record highs.

As more people reach for a pack of bacon at the grocery store, pig farmers are struggling to keep up the demand, according to a report from the Wall Street Journal. The price for pork-belly, the part of the hog used to make bacon, has risen around 80 percent in 2017.

Americans bought 14 percent more bacon at stores in 2016 compared to 2013, according to data from Nielsen. The increased interest in bacon means increased business for farmers — the national hog herd rose to a seasonal record of nearly 72 million in early June, but it hasn’t helped them keep up with the demand.

Bacon has become a staple in breakfast sandwiches, BLTs, lunch sandwiches and other trendy recipes like Cheesy Bacon Popcorn, Bacon Kraut, Bacon-Wrapped Scallops and Bacon Grits. Even fast-food chains are adding specialty bacon dishes like Arby’s “triple thick” bacon sandwiches, Wendy’s Bacon Queso Burger and Bacon Queso Fries or Frisch’s Primetime BLT Cheeseburger.

“Everybody and their mother is coming out with a new bacon sandwich,” livestock trader Dan Norcini told the Wall Street Journal.

Prices are at a record high for wholesale pork belly, the largest increase in price since 2013. Lean hog futures at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange hit a 2½-year high in early July, according to the Wall Street Journal. Local stores say bacon prices have increased significantly just recently.

“The bacon is out of sight,” said Dave Hoffer, owner of Zinks Meats & Fine Wines. “Especially in the last couple weeks, we had to raise the prices here because of it. There isn’t really an increase in demand from customers either, it’s staying constant.”

Altin Kalo, an economist at the Steiner Consulting Group, told the Wall Street Journal that high prices have lead butchers and restaurants to actually slice bacon more thinly or introduce alternate menu items. Other anaylsts say the high prices aren’t going to stop restaurants and customers from buying more bacon — it’s a year-long favorite meat.

“I don’t really think cost will affect the demand very much because people who like it and prefer it, the cost won’t deter them as long as it’s not ridiculous,” said John Rodgers, a production employee for Copey’s Butcher Shop in Medway.

Reporter Sarah Cavender contributed to this story.