Kettering could purchase 305 acres at Miami Valley Research Park

Published: Friday, May 19, 2017 @ 5:07 PM


            City of Kettering will purchase 305 acres of the Miami Valley Research Park for $1.5 million. FILE

In a push to attract new businesses to the city, Kettering could soon buy 305 acres of the land in the Miami Valley Research Park.

The city is expected to approve a contract Tuesday to purchase the undeveloped land in the Kettering portion of the giant commercial business park. The non-profit foundation, Miami Valley Research Foundation, that runs the development has been looking to sell off land and buildings.

Gregg Gorsuch, Kettering’s economic development manager, told the Dayton Daily News that if council agrees to the contract, the city would close on the deal in July. He said the deal will cost the city $1.5 million at closing, and could go up to $3 million if certain deed restrictions are lifted. The deal does not include any buildings already standing.

One of those major deed restrictions requires any business that moves into the park to be science or research-oriented. Gorsuch said the purchase would allow Kettering to lure in new businesses and help current businesses expand within city limits — a major economic driver.

» INITIAL REPORT: Kettering to purchase 305 acres of Miami Valley Research Park

“The biggest restriction is the requirement for any business operation going out there having to have a research and development component to it,” he said. “It’s fine, we can do that, but it would open it up to more business opportunities if it was lifted.”

If the restrictions are removed, the city would then be able to utilize its locally controlled zoning codes to work with prospective businesses, said Stacy Wall Schweikhart, city spokeswoman.

The business park spans 1,250 acres in Kettering and Beavercreek and is home to some of the Miami Valley’s largest companies, including Reynolds and Reynolds. In October, the Dayton Daily News reported that the Miami Valley Research Foundation was looking to sell four buildings and more than 700 acres of undeveloped land valued at $30 million.

In the early 1980s, the state granted more than 600 acres of land and $20 million to develop a business park that would focus on research, scientific, academic and related organizations. Later, more land was purchased in Beavercreek to bring the total to 1,250 acres — that land does not have a deed restriction that the original land has, which stipulates what type of company can acquire residence within the park.

» RELATED: Mass casualty exercise planned in Kettering

Land Holding LLC will assume ownership of the four existing buildings from the foundation. The University of Dayton, Wright State University, and Sinclair Community College will continue to lead efforts, in collaboration with regional leaders, to attract innovative new organizations to the complex, according to a statement.

Local college presidents from Sinclair Community College, the University of Dayton and Wright State University are permanent trustees of the foundation, and they now say the park should transition into a new phase — with new ownership of the land, different leadership in the foundation, and a loosening of property deed restrictions.

WSU, Sinclair and UD presidents are permanent Class A trustees, and MVRF board chair Steve Johnson said they don’t see the need for presidents to be required leaders of the foundation. It would require state action to officially take the presidents off the board.

“The Miami Valley Research Foundation Board is pleased with this news, both for what it means for our community and for the future of the Miami Valley Research Park,” Johnson said. “This investment provides an excellent opportunity for economic development for the future of our community and also provides the Research Park with the stability needed to move forward. This is a great day for all parties involved.”

The original purpose was to promote scientific and technology-based work within higher education while creating a tighter knit community of local universities. Johnston told this newspaper in a previous interview that the recession had impacted the economic health of the park, and it was difficult to use the same business model the park was founded under.

As the economy bounces back, the land will open new opportunities for the city, said Kettering Mayor Don Patterson. He said the universities worked graciously with the city to execute the land purchase.

“Reinvestment in the Miami Valley Research Park is essential to the long term growth and stability of our region,” Patterson said. “As a land-locked community, the opportunity to acquire green space appropriate for commercial development is rare and one we couldn’t pass up. We are confident that this is a wise investment for the future of Kettering.”

BY THE NUMBERS

1,250: total acres in the park

$410 million: amount of capital investment in park development

22: total buildings in the park

450: total acres developed in the park

4,000+: workers in the park at various companies

OHIO IMPACT: More Ohio Kmart, Sears stores to close by September

Published: Wednesday, June 28, 2017 @ 9:26 AM

Sears Holdings will close 20 more Sears and Kmart stores in the U.S., on top of the 245 closings already announced early this year — and the latest round of cuts will affect Ohio locations.

The company announced the latest closures to store employees early this week, according to Business Insider. The new list of closures include Sears department stores in in Sarasota, Florida; Roseville, Michigan; Toledo, Ohio; and Overland Park, Kansas, among others, according to the report.

» STORE CLOSINGS: 9 things that happened in retail in June

Three Ohio stores made the list, but none of them were located in Southwest Ohio. In March, the company warned there is “substantial doubt” that the stores can continue to survive, according to an ominous warning filed in a report with the Security and Exchange Commission. The company lost $2.2 billion in sales last year.

» RELATED: Kmart, Sears stores to close in Ohio

The new list of closures include:

— 8201 S Tamiami Trail, Sarasota, FL

— 1601 N Harlem Ave, Chicago, IL

— 9701 Metcalf Ave, Overland Park, KS

— 5715 Johnston Street, Lafayette, LA

— 4575 La Jolla Village Drive, San Diego

— 126 Shawan Road, Cockeysville, MD

» RELATED: Are Sears and Kmart closing near you? Company issues somber notice

— 17318 Valley Mall Road, Hagerstown, MD

— 32123 Gratiot Avenue, Roseville, MI

— 14250 Buck Hill Road, Burnsville, MN

— 1640 Route 22, Watchung, NJ

— 1425 Central Avenue, Albany, NY

— 4000 Jericho Turnpike, East Northport, NY

— 601-635 Harry L. Drive, Johnson City, NY

— 7875 Johnnycake Ridge Road, Mentor, OH

— 6950 W 130th Street, Middleburg Heights, OH

— 3408 W Central Avenue, Toledo, OH

— 650 Bald Hill Road, Warwick, RI

— 300 Baybrook Mall, Friendswood, TX

— 9570 Southwest Freeway, Houston, TX

— 5200 South 76th Street, Greendale, WI

Dayton airport sees decrease in airport traffic

Published: Wednesday, June 28, 2017 @ 1:31 PM


            FILE

Passenger traffic at the Dayton International Airport decreased by nearly 3,000 passengers last month compared to the same time in 2016.

Approximately 93,244 passengers flew by way of the Dayton airport in May, compared to the more than 96,224 who traveled during the same month in 2016. Approximately 405,659 travelers have flown from the Dayton airport so far this year, compared to the 416,023 passengers who flew in the same time period last year.

It was the last full month of service for Southwest Airlines at the Dayton airport, and 10,189 travelers flew with the air carrier in May. That was about 1,000 less than the same time last year. Southwest halted services in early June, in favor of adding services at the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport.

» Dayton Airport director’s plan to lure passengers: Bigger planes, more flights

Dayton saw an increase in passengers who flew with Allegiant Air, which recently celebrated its one-year anniversary of service at the airport. Approximately 3,853 passengers flew with the low-cost carrier in may, compared to the 2,758 passengers who flew Allegiant in May 2016. Part of that increase can be attributed to new routes added at the Dayton airport, including a new flight to Myrtle Beach that started on May 24.

While Dayton saw an overall slight decrease in passenger volume, some larger airports continue to thrive. More passengers flew out of the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport last month than ever before.

Local traffic was up more than 16 percent year-over-year with 323,049 originating passengers, compared to 278,344 in May 2016, representing 44,705 new travelers coming through CVG’s front door. That’s more than any other month in the airport’s 70-year history.

» RELATED: 5 tips for booking cheap flights

“At CVG, we’re embracing what’s next and planning for a bright future, as we work to continue breaking records by growing both passenger and cargo operations, and lowering airfares,” said Candace McGraw, chief executive officer for CVG. “The new activity and additional landed weight will enable CVG to continue lowering its landing fees, benefiting all carriers while ensuring we remain a great place to do business. CVG is operating its business in a very strategic way, and we’re seeing tremendous results.”

» RELATED: After Southwest departure, what’s next for Dayton airport?

In May, CVG offered nonstop service to 47 domestic and five international destinations, more than any other airport in the Tri-State region. CVG passengers, on average, are paying $170 less per round-trip ticket than they were two years ago.

Raising Cane’s Chicken Fingers: 3 things to know

Published: Wednesday, June 28, 2017 @ 11:08 AM


            FILE

Raising Cane’s Chicken Fingers opens its first Dayton-area location today at 1136 Miamisburg-Centerville Road in Washington Twp.

Raising Cane’s joins an increasingly competitive chicken-restaurant market, with most of the recent growth focused on Dayton’s south suburbs.

CHECK OUT THREE THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT RAISING CANE’S

Record travel expected for July Fourth weekend in Ohio, U.S.

Published: Wednesday, June 28, 2017 @ 9:41 AM

FILE

A record-breaking number of travelers will hit the road in Ohio and across the U.S. for the July Fourth weekend, crowding highways and airports.

More than 44 million Americans and nearly two million Ohio residents will travel for the holiday weekend, according to an analysis by AAA. That’s the highest July Fourth travel volume on records, and represents a nearly 3 percent increase compared to 2016.

The holiday travel period is defined as Friday to Tuesday. This year, approximately 1.9 million Ohio residents plan to celebrate the holiday over the long holiday weekend. More than 1.6 million plan to drive to their destination, an increase of more than 3 percent compared to last year.

» RELATED: New travel, insurance center opens in Beavercreek

“Based on traveler intent, we are on pace for record-setting travel this summer” said AAA spokesperson Cindy Antrican. “Enthusiastic Miami Valley area travelers are joining in the travel frenzy as well”.

The top travel destinations here locally?
  1. Myrtle Beach, South Carolina
  2. Gettysburg, Pennsylvania
  3. Ft Walton Beach/ Destin – Florida Panhandle
  4. Hershey, Pennsylvania
  5. In and around Ohio